1. Diné (Navajo) weavers developed complex multicolor textiles in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This exuberant style — often called “Transitional” or “Germantown” weaving — was the focus of a recent exhibition appropriately titled Color Riot or Nidaashch’ąą’ Deesdǫǫh in Diné.

    The exhibition explored weavers' creative agency and the social contexts of this active textile practice in the past and present. It was developed by the Heard Museum in Phoenix and was on display at the Montclair Art Museum in 2021.

    Through a virtual tour moderated by Laura Allen, weaver Velma Kee Craig, one of the three Diné curators of the original exhibition, will speak closely to the stunning textiles selected and the exhibition's themes. Larissa Nez (Diné), a contributing curator for the Montclair installation, will share additional community and artistic perspectives on weaving.

    Speakers
    Velma Kee Craig, assistant curator, Heard Museum

    Larissa Nez, M.A. student, Brown University

    Laura J. Allen, curator of Native American art, Montclair Art Museum (moderator)

    About Rug and Textile Appreciation Mornings
    Collectors and experts discuss textile topics and display examples from their personal holdings. This series is named in honor of late Textile Museum trustee emeritus, Harold M. Keshishian. Browse upcoming programs.

    The views and opinions expressed by program speakers do not necessarily reflect the policies or positions of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, or its partners.

    # vimeo.com/700562582 Uploaded 118 Views 0 Comments
  2. Feltmaking has existed for millennia in the cities and villages of what is now the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of northwest China — homeland of the Muslim, Turkic-speaking Uyghurs. Archeological discoveries give a sense of this ancient art, which continued to flourish in the oases that dot the southern rim of the Taklamakan desert.

    In this virtual talk researcher Christine Martens examines the felt processes and compares Uyghur felt with the traditions of the Turkmen, Kyrgyz and Turks, including gender roles in felt making.

    Martens also examines how Uyghur cultural history and the “everyday” exist within the spiritual landscape of southern Xinjiang. She explores the participation in shrine visitation and the use of the “risala,” a treatise or guidebook governing the moral, spiritual and ethical behavior of artisans, to shed light on little-known aspects of Uyghur sacred history and accompanying rituals.

    About Christine Martens
    Christine Martens is an artist and independent researcher documenting and writing about textile traditions of Central Asia. She has conducted fieldwork in Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Mongolia and Northwest China as a Fulbright Scholar, IREX fellow and Asian Cultural Council grantee.

    About Rug and Textile Appreciation Mornings
    Collectors and experts discuss textile topics and display examples from their personal holdings. This series is named in honor of late Textile Museum trustee emeritus, Harold M. Keshishian.

    The views and opinions expressed by program speakers do not necessarily reflect the policies or positions of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, or its partners.

    # vimeo.com/684382493 Uploaded 95 Views 0 Comments
  3. Robert Mann discusses key questions around the restoration of rugs and carpets.

    Rugs lead tough lives, and the wear and tear of daily use can take its toll. A textile collector's long-sought weaving often arrives in less than perfect condition. Household rugs may eventually need care beyond cleaning to repair frayed ends, edges and holes.

    Rug restoration employs a range of sewing and weaving techniques that can be used to stabilize and conserve damaged structure or, if necessary, completely re-weave and replace missing fabric. The best repairs match materials, weave structure and color undetectably, restoring both value and function to a rug. This virtual discussion will explore questions about whether a rug ought to be repaired, and what techniques can be employed.

    About Robert Mann
    In 1978 Robert Mann began a career in the rug business as an apprentice to an Iranian rug restorer named Hamid Sharifzadeh. In 1982 Mann opened a cleaning and restoration facility in Denver, Colorado. Today Robert Mann Rugs specializes in the care of handwoven area rugs, Southwestern textiles and other related weavings. It offers a range of services: cleaning, repairs, restoration, mounting, appraisal and expert consultation.

    About Rug and Textile Appreciation Mornings
    Collectors and experts discuss textile topics and display examples from their personal holdings. This series is named in honor of late Textile Museum trustee emeritus, Harold M. Keshishian.

    The views and opinions expressed by program speakers do not necessarily reflect the policies or positions of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, or its partners.

    # vimeo.com/673250087 Uploaded 263 Views 0 Comments
  4. In this virtual trek along the Silk Road, collector Roger Pratt will show images and discuss examples of a variety of hats from his personal holdings. These include Turkmen hats, Turkmen Tekke hats, Central Asian non-Turkmen hats, Persian conical Dervish hats, Central Asian longtail hats, inscribed religious hats and Ottoman Syrian Aleppo hats. The hats were first displayed in 2018 at the International Conference on Oriental Carpets XIV in Washington, D.C.

    For additional historical and cultural context, the program will be punctuated with readings of poetry and prose from the region. Participants are invited to submit hats from their personal collections for a show and tell following the talk.

    About Rug and Textile Appreciation Mornings
    Collectors and experts discuss textile topics and display examples from their personal holdings. This series is named in honor of late Textile Museum trustee emeritus, Harold M. Keshishian.

    The views and opinions expressed by program speakers do not necessarily reflect the policies or positions of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, or its partners.

    # vimeo.com/656744485 Uploaded 214 Views 0 Comments
  5. In this virtual talk, historian and author Lauren MacKay threads the magnificent intersection of East and West into the broader Tudor narrative, with vivid visual representations of Oriental material culture, which flowed between the Islamic world and the Tudor’s “Sceptred Isle.”

    For the Tudors, the Islamic world of the 16th century was an endless source of fascination and delight, swathed in fine silks, bursting with spices and draped in luxurious and vibrant tapestries and carpets. Henry VIII’s chief minister, Cardinal Wolsey, began the Tudor love affair with Orientalism, and soon English society coveted Ottoman and Persian culture: Its art, dress, textiles and carpets became highly sought–after symbols of wealth and power.

    Royal inventories overflowed with Ottoman and Persian carpets traded to England, and there are detailed accounts of Henry VIII’s opulent and costly Turkish themed banquets. It was the ambition of royalty and of any wealthy noble family — indeed of Henry himself — to be portrayed at least once in their lives in a portrait featuring an Oriental textile or carpet. Henry’s daughter, Elizabeth I, excommunicated and exiled from the rest of Europe, would further the relationship between England and its Eastern counterparts by making the unprecedented move of reaching out to both the Ottoman and Persian Empires, wearing contemporary English court gowns made of their silks, and commanding their respect, earning the title “Sultana Isabel”.

    This program is a partnership with the Textile Museum Associates of Southern California.

    About Lauren Mackay:
    Lauren Mackay is a historian of early modern Europe whose areas of research encompass medieval and early modern politics, renaissance and reformation, early modern literature and culture. Dr. Mackay is author of three books, and lectures for venues including the Tower of London, Windsor Castle, The National Archives and The Portrait Gallery in London. She is a regular contributor to BBC History Magazine and All About History Magazine. Dr. Mackay received a master’s in history from the University of New England and a doctorate from the University of Newcastle, Australia. She is also a fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

    About Rug and Textile Appreciation Morning:
    Collectors and experts discuss textile topics and display examples from their personal holdings. This series is named in honor of late Textile Museum trustee emeritus, Harold M. Keshishian.

    The views and opinions expressed by program speakers do not necessarily reflect the policies or positions of the George Washington Museum and The Textile Museum, or its partners.

    # vimeo.com/646572374 Uploaded 242 Views 0 Comments

Rug and Textile Appreciation Mornings

GW Museum and Textile Museum PRO

Collectors and researchers discuss textile topics and display examples from their personal holdings. Participants are invited to submit related pieces to share during the program. This series is organized in memory of Textile Museum Trustee Harold M.…


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Collectors and researchers discuss textile topics and display examples from their personal holdings. Participants are invited to submit related pieces to share during the program. This series is organized in memory of Textile Museum Trustee Harold M. Keshishian.

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