1. Doc in a Box is based on a real life experience that I had at a doctor’s office. Doc in a Box seeks to reveal traumatic experiences via the mechanisms of humor and puppets. Everything that is said in the video is a real life account of what happened to me during this visit. Doc in a Box is an attempt to reclaim psychological space as someone whom is trans. In a fit of rage Doc in a Box was created during the month of July 2015.

    Our Mission Statement
    We are excited to bring the Doc in a Box experience to you. Here at Doc in a Box we pride on treating “everyone” in our community as well as the transgender population. In other words we offer full-spectrum care. We have a zero tolerance policy for any kind of discrimination. ABSOLUTELY! We want to know everything about you! We want to get you hooked up with a therapist so you can continue your journey! We are here for you! Stop by and see us today.

    # vimeo.com/133288299 Uploaded 549 Views 0 Comments
  2. 2012 / 2013
    "It was not intended to drive people crazy, but to save people from being driven crazy, and it worked." ~ Charlotte Perkins Gilman

    Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s short story, The Yellow Wallpaper published in January 1892 in The New England Magazine, begins to deconstruct the effects of attitudes towards women's physical and mental health in the 19th century. The Yellow Wallpaper is a story about a woman locked in a room by her husband and doctors depicts the effects of solitary confinement; she eventually descends into a state of psychosis. The lack of stimulation caused by utter isolation due to the fact that she was forbidden from working or leaving her bedroom, leads her to become obsessed by the pattern and color of the wallpaper in her bedroom, "I lie here on this great immovable bed - it is nailed down, I believe - and follow that pattern about by the hour" (9 Gilman).

    Gilman's protagonist comes to suspect that another woman was once confined in the same room against her will. Believing that she must try to free the woman in the wallpaper; the narrator begins to strip the remaining paper off the wall. “I pulled and she shook, I shook and she pulled” She exclaims, "I've got out at last," and her husband faints as she continues to circle the room, stepping over his inert body each time she passes. The moment of push/pull between the narrator and the women behind the paper could be seen as the struggle between the impossibility/future possibilities of a queer desire. She has been positioned as a character, whose credibility has been seriously compromised, because of her downward spiral into madness; However, The Yellow Wallpaper can be seen as having a Degree of triumph, and points to the possibility of queer existence. “The term “queer” and some of its cognates resonate very strongly in Gilman’s short story. The Video adaptation of The Yellow Wallpaper has a queer slant, as with shifting identities, the meaning and metaphor are never completely resolved and can never be fixed. The Video asks for a queer reconsideration of Gilman's short story.

    # vimeo.com/54568981 Uploaded 1,399 Views 0 Comments
  3. The act of looking backward is a ghostly, impossible, and an unreachable act. Never is an extremely short but rigorous performance. I force myself through the neon green, fuzzy, fleece and constricting tube that acts as Pan's shadow. The audience acts as witness for things that are found unnamable, unknowable and impossible. Growing up as a queer child presents a difficulty when you have no way of explaining why you do not see yourself reflected back in the world around you. Pan does not have a shadow and possesses no way of looking backward. Never attempts to make present the absence or lack of shadow. By crawling through the tube I embody Pan's shadow or reflection as a form of bringing out what was already queer. *Photo documentation: Hayley Morgenstern and Cynthia Post Hunt. NEVER has been performed at the following places: Mudlark Theatre, New Orleans, Louisiana and Inverse Performance Art Festival, Northwest Arkansas.

    # vimeo.com/298761367 Uploaded 72 Views 0 Comments
  4. Performing Process, Love School Performance Festival, Mudlark Theatre, New Orleans, Louisiana

    The act of looking backward is a ghostly, impossible, and an unreachable act. Never is an extremely short but rigorous performance. I force myself through the neon green, fuzzy, fleece and constricting tube that acts as Pan's shadow. The audience acts as witness for things that are found unnamable, unknowable and impossible. Growing up as a queer child presents a difficulty when you have no way of explaining why you do not see yourself reflected back in the world around you. Pan does not have a shadow and possesses no way of looking backward. Never attempts to make present the absence or lack of shadow. By crawling through the tube I embody Pan's shadow or reflection as a form of bringing out what was already queer.

    # vimeo.com/246691325 Uploaded 123 Views 0 Comments
  5. Creating Surgery was a way for me to attempt to come to terms with the disappointment, and the failure to be seen as trans and the slowness of change in regards to how others use language to speak or "not speak" about my existence. Michael Fried in his essay, “Art and Objecthood” (1967) mandates that "Theatrical art is, in his words, corrupt, perverted, incurable, infectious, and degenerate." The previous words are synonymous with the language that has been used to speak about my existence as a trans person and trans people. They refuse our physical existence, because they are uncomfortable with our genitalia or what might be under our clothes. I am seeking to validate the potential idea of queering theatricality, in life as well as my artistic practice.

    “No one has ever written, painted, sculpted, modeled, built, or invented except literally to get out of hell.” ~ Artaud

    Point number five from the Non-Trans/Cisgender Privilege Checklist

    5.) Strangers and acquaintances do not ask what my genitals look like or what medical procedures I have had.

    Surgery, is an ongoing collaborative video project. Artists / videos appearing left to right: Sarah Hill, Creighton Baxter, Bug Davidson, and more to come.

    # vimeo.com/54336317 Uploaded 987 Views 0 Comments

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