1. As a part of our online interview series for The Textile Museum Journal, contributing scholar Silvia Forni joins German-Ghanaian artist Zohra Opoku to discuss Opoku's textile works and poetic approach to image making.

    Dr. Forni examines Opoku’s art and shares insights from her conversations with the artist herself on the key series produced by Opoku in the last decade. Dr. Forni explores how the materiality of the textiles worn by the artist or chosen as her canvas provide insights into Opoku’s poetics and her exploration of the cultural, social and political narrative of contemporary Ghana.

    About The Textile Museum Journal
    Our peer-reviewed journal is the leading publication for the exchange of textile scholarship in North America. Published each fall, it features research on the cultural, technical, historical and aesthetic significance of textiles from all around the world. Learn more about the journal

    About Silvia Forni
    Dr. Forni is senior curator of Art & Culture: Global Africa, and deputy head of the Department of Art and Culture at the Royal Ontario Museum. She has curated several partial gallery reinstallations and exhibitions and is the author of numerous essays and book chapters. Dr. Forni co-created the “Of Africa” project. She is also associate professor of anthropology at the University of Toronto and sessional lecturer at the Ontario College of Art and Design University.

    About Zohra Opoku
    Zohra Opoku’s artwork examines the politics of personal identity formation through historical, cultural and socio-economic influences, particularly in the context of contemporary Ghana. She integrates family heirlooms and her own self-image into her visual observations of Ghana’s cultural memory. Her practice centers around textiles and traditional Ghanaian dress codes, which have been an inherent part of the country’s identity and industry.

    About the Series
    In this virtual series, authors who contributed to volume 48 of The Textile Museum Journal discuss new research on African textiles with guest editor Sarah Fee.

    The views and opinions expressed by program speakers do not necessarily reflect the policies or positions of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, or its partners.

    # vimeo.com/687508079 Uploaded 53 Views 0 Comments
  2. As a part of our online interview series for The Textile Museum Journal, contributing scholar Jean Borgatti and artist and art historian Peju Layiwola discuss Dr. Layiwola’s recent body of work, Indigo Reimagined.

    Dr. Layiwola draws from her skill as artist as well as a scholar to explore the process of indigo dyed cloth within the Yoruba tradition. Dr. Borgatti and Dr. Layiwola will discuss how Dr. Layiwola moved as artist from metal work and historical (Benin Kingdom-focused) installations to textiles as inspiration for the major series of works featured in her exhibition Indigo Reimagined.

    About The Textile Museum Journal
    Our peer-reviewed journal is the leading publication for the exchange of textile scholarship in North America. Published each fall, it features research on the cultural, technical, historical and aesthetic significance of textiles from all around the world.

    About Jean Borgatti
    Dr. Borgatti was a professor of art history at the University of Benin and has faculty status at Clark University and Boston University. She is the consulting curator of African, Oceanic and Native American art at the Fitchburg Art Museum. She also has multiple journal publications and received the 2014 Arts Council of the African Studies Association lifetime achievement award.

    About Peju Layiwola
    Dr. Layiwola is a visual artist and a professor of art history at the University of Lagos. She is founder of the Women and Youth Art Foundation, an organization committed to empowering women, girls and youth through the arts. She has received many prestigious awards and is author of many publications.

    About the Series
    In this virtual series, authors who contributed to volume 48 of The Textile Museum Journal discuss new research on African textiles with guest editor Sarah Fee.

    The views and opinions expressed by program speakers do not necessarily reflect the policies or positions of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, or its partners.

    # vimeo.com/687199309 Uploaded 119 Views 0 Comments
  3. As a part of our online interview series for The Textile Museum Journal, contributing scholar Elisha P. Renne discusses her research collaboration with the late Abdulkarim Umar DanAsabe on a selection of royal garments worn by the Emir of Kano, Muhammadu Sanusi II.

    Dr. Renne examines the royal garments alongside discussions with palace officials, embroiderers and tailors. By analyzing photographs of burnouses, robes and turbans worn by Sarkin Muhammadu Sanusi II and earlier emirs, she learned how these garments illustrate their public nature and how they have contributed to the continuing political authority of traditional rulers in northern Nigeria.

    About The Textile Museum Journal
    Our peer-reviewed journal is the leading publication for the exchange of textile scholarship in North America. Published each fall, it features research on the cultural, technical, historical and aesthetic significance of textiles from all around the world.

    About Elisha P. Renne
    Dr. Renne is professor emerita in the departments of anthropology and of Afroamerican and African Studies at University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. Her interests include African ethnology and infectious disease, religion and the anthropology of textiles, and reproductive health and gender relations. She is the author and editor of multiple publications and has contributed to many academic journals.

    About the Series
    In this virtual series, authors who contributed to volume 48 of The Textile Museum Journal discuss new research on African textiles with guest editor Sarah Fee. Browse all interview

    The views and opinions expressed by program speakers do not necessarily reflect the policies or positions of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, or its partners.

    # vimeo.com/681476100 Uploaded 67 Views 0 Comments
  4. As a part of our online interview series for The Textile Museum Journal, contributing scholar Cecile Fromont will discuss Kongo textiles, which are celebrated as masterpieces of exquisite workmanship but garner limited attention in scholarship.

    Dr. Fromont analyzes the state of research about Kongo textiles, brings to the fore the recent discoveries that illuminate some aspects of it, and reflects on the causes and consequences of the historiographic lacunae that surround them. In her interview, she discusses the paradox posed by Kongo textiles and how getting to know Early Modern western Central African textiles builds connections between the fields of African art history, global studies of the early modern period and textile analysis.

    About The Textile Museum Journal
    Our peer-reviewed journal is the leading publication for the exchange of textile scholarship in North America. Published each fall, it features research on the cultural, technical, historical and aesthetic significance of textiles from all around the world.

    About Cécile Fromont
    Dr. Fromont is associate professor in the History of Art Department at Yale University, the author of The Art of Conversion: Christian Visual Culture in the Kingdon of Kongo and an editor and contributor to Afro-Catholic Festivals in the Americas: Performance, Representation, and the Making of Black Atlantic Tradition.

    About the Series
    In this virtual series, authors who contributed to volume 48 of The Textile Museum Journal discuss new research on African textiles with guest editor Sarah Fee.

    The views and opinions expressed by program speakers do not necessarily reflect the policies or positions of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, or its partners.

    # vimeo.com/680523397 Uploaded 101 Views 0 Comments
  5. As a part of our online interview series for The Textile Museum Journal, contributing scholar Myriem Naji discusses her study of the “akhnif,” a woven-to-shape semi-circular garment worn in southern Morocco until the 1950s.

    Dr. Naji combines the insights gained from the ethnographic fieldwork among the Ayt Waghrda mountain dwellers of the Sirwa, the commissioning of an akhnif and the study of historical objects in European and Moroccan museums. In this interview, she will examine how this garment is closely related to others in North Africa and how her research contributes to the understanding of the wider history of the Mediterranean traditions of weaving cloths to shape.

    About The Textile Museum Journal
    Our peer-reviewed journal is the leading publication for the exchange of textile scholarship in North America. Published each fall, it features research on the cultural, technical, historical and aesthetic significance of textiles from all around the world. Learn more about the journal

    About Myriem Naji
    Dr. Naji is an honorary research fellow at the Department of Anthropology, University College London, where she earned a doctorate in 2008. In 2011, she curated the exhibition Weaving the Threads of Livelihood: The Aesthetic and Embodied Knowledge of Sirwa Weavers at the Brunei Gallery, SOAS University of London.

    About the Series
    In this virtual series, authors who contributed to volume 48 of The Textile Museum Journal discuss new research on African textiles with guest editor Sarah Fee.

    The views and opinions expressed by program speakers do not necessarily reflect the policies or positions of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, or its partners.

    # vimeo.com/675956827 Uploaded 95 Views 0 Comments

Textile Museum Journal Interviews

GW Museum and Textile Museum

Listen to authors who contributed to The Textile Museum Journal discuss the importance of understanding the historical and cultural context of textiles.

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