1. Golan Levin discusses the Augmented Hand Series (2014, by Golan Levin, Chris Sugrue, and Kyle McDonald) at the Chemnitz Museum of Industry, Germany, November 2017, as part of the exhibition "GESTEN - GESTERN, HEUTE, ÜBERMORGEN", organized by Ars Electronica. web.saechsisches-industriemuseum.com/chemnitz/sonderausstellungen/gesten-gestern-heute-uebermorgen.html

    # vimeo.com/253497395 Uploaded 141 Plays 0 Comments
  2. The "Augmented Hand Series" (by Golan Levin, Chris Sugrue, and Kyle McDonald, 2014) is a real-time, interactive software system that presents playful, dreamlike, and uncanny transformations of its visitors' hands. This video documents interactions with the system by attendees of the Thrival Festival in Pittsburgh, October 2017.

    The installation consists of a kiosk into which the participant inserts their hand, and a touchscreen which 'reveals' their hand—reimagined and defamiliarized by various structural and dynamic alterations. The kiosk is accompanied by a large rear-projection which duplicates the smaller touchscreen.

    The Augmented Hand Series was commissioned by the Cinekid Festival with support from the Mondriaan Fund. Developed at the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry at Carnegie Mellon University with additional support from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and the Frank-Ratchye Fund for Art @ the Frontier. Concept and software development: Golan Levin, Chris Sugrue, Kyle McDonald. Software assistance: Bryce Summers, Zachary Rispoli, Dan Wilcox, Erica Lazrus. Conceived 2004; developed 2013-2014. Developed in openFrameworks.

    Videography: Hugh Huntington 'Smokey' Dyar IV
    Music: (CC) Mandy Mozart featuring Jiin Ko

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  3. Scrapple (2005: Golan Levin) is an audiovisual installation and/or performance in which everyday objects placed on a table are interpreted as sound-producing marks in an “active score.” The Scrapple system scans a table surface as if it were a kind of music notation, producing music in real-time from any objects lying there. The installation makes use of a variety of playful forms; in particular, long flexible curves allow for the creation of variable melodies, while an assemblage of cloth shapes, small objects and wind-up toys yields ever-changing rhythms. Video projections on the Scrapple table transform the surface into a simple augmented reality, in which the objects placed by users are elaborated through luminous and explanatory graphics. The 3-meter long table produces a 4-second audio loop, allowing participants to experiment freely with tangible, interactive audiovisual composition. In the Scrapple installation, "the table is the score".

    Scrapple was developed in openFrameworks, and was created with support from the artist residency program of the Ars Electronica Futurelab. More information is available at flong.com/projects/scrapple/.

    # vimeo.com/227633208 Uploaded 76 Plays 0 Comments
  4. Scrapple (2005: Golan Levin) is an audiovisual installation in which everyday objects placed on a table are interpreted as sound-producing marks in an “active score.” The Scrapple system scans a table surface as if it were a kind of music notation, producing music in real-time from any objects lying there. The installation makes use of a variety of playful forms; in particular, long flexible curves allow for the creation of variable melodies, while an assemblage of cloth shapes, small objects and wind-up toys yields ever-changing rhythms. Video projections on the Scrapple table transform the surface into a simple augmented reality, in which the objects placed by users are elaborated through luminous and explanatory graphics. The 3-meter long table produces a 4-second audio loop, allowing participants to experiment freely with tangible, interactive audiovisual composition. In the Scrapple installation, the table is the score.

    # vimeo.com/2379890 Uploaded 8,045 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Footfalls (2006, by Golan Levin and Zachary Lieberman) is an interactive audiovisual installation in which the stomping of the visitors' feet creates cascades of bouncy virtual forms.

    Stomping sounds produced by the visitors' feet are detected by microphones under the floor. These signals govern the number of virtual objects that fall from a six-meter high projection. The harder the visitors stomp, the more items are dislodged from above. Using their silhouettes, visitors can also "catch" and "throw" these projected objects around.

    Footfalls was commissioned in July 2006 by the NTT InterCommunicationsCenter (ICC), Tokyo. The documentation shown here is from a presentation of the project at Centre Beaulieu, Nantes, France, in May 2008. Footfalls was developed in openFrameworks by Tmema (Golan Levin and Zachary Lieberman).
    flong.com/projects/footfalls/

    # vimeo.com/227568299 Uploaded 349 Plays 0 Comments

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