1. A talk by Judy Hussie-Taylor.

    July,1962 marked the first performances of a radically diverse group of artists under the umbrella of Judson Dance Theater. During the four most active years of Judson Dance Theater (1962-1966) hundreds of choreographers, visual artists, poets, musicians and filmmakers experimented with new modes of performance composition and in so doing changed the course of art and dance history. In 2012 Judy Hussie-Taylor, executive and artistic director of Danspace Project at St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery, invited many of the original Judson Dance Theater artists as well as a new generation of artists to consider the impact of Judson on their work today. Hussie-Taylor will talk about organizing PLATFORM 2012: Judson NOW which included live presentations by Steve Paxton, Lucinda Childs, Deborah Hay, David Gordon, Yvonne Rainer, Simone Forti, Meredith Monk and Carolee Schneemann, among many other contemporary artists.

    About Judy Hussie-Taylor, Executive and Artistic Director Danspace Project

    Ms. Hussie-Taylor is the former Director of the nationally acclaimed Colorado Dance Festival (CDF), she has also served as Artistic Director for Performance Programs at the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art and Deputy Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art/Denver. From 2000 – 2004 she taught in the Department of Art & Art History at the University of Colorado-Boulder and served as faculty, committee member and interim director of the Department’s Visiting Artist Program. Through her work at CDF, she co-developed two multi-year National Endowment for the Arts projects including “Let’s Dance: The Americas” and participated in the National Performance Network and the National Dance Project. From 2005 - 07 she served as a consultant and on the faculty for the National Dance Project’s Regional Dance Development Initiative (Pacific Northwest and San Francisco Bay Area Dance Labs). Since taking the helm at Danspace Project she has developed a critically-acclaimed series, featured in The Sunday New York Times (Arts & Leisure Section, April 11, 2010), entitled the PLATFORMS which features artist curators and new contexts for dance presenting. As part of this program she has developed a series of catalogues published by Danspace Project. She has recently been a participant at the UC Berkeley Arts Research Center’s Making Time symposium (April, 2012); was invited to give a special series of three lectures on performance curation at the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage (spring, 2012); and was the curator of PLATFORM 2012: Judson Now celebrating the 50th anniversary of Judson Dance Theater. From 2010 – 2013 she participated in public presentations at APAP, Dance USA, and NYS Dance Force convenings as well as collaborated with the Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Media and Performance Art to develop ancillary programming for the dance series Some sweet day curated by Ralph Lemon at MoMA. She is currently program advisor for and on the faculty of the new Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance, a program of Center for the Arts, Wesleyan University. In 2013 she was featured as one of New York’s “Movers and Shapers” by the New York Times (Arts & Leisure, September 20, 2013) and was conferred with a Chevalier de L’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Government.

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  2. Acclaimed documentary photographer Susan Meiselas, celebrated Iranian-born video artist and filmmaker Shirin Neshat ,and internationally exhibited artist Lisa Ross discuss the connections between art and global human rights issues, their work, and the tole of artistic identity as a voice in the arena of social justice. Carey Lovelace, Co-Commissioner of the United States Pavilion for the 2013 Venice Biennale, moderates.

    Susan Meiselas joined Magnum Photos in 1976, and was instrumental in establishing the Magnum Foundation, an organization that supports, trains and mentors the next generation of documentary photographers. As a freelance photographer, she is best known for her coverage of the insurrection in Nicaragua and her documentation of human rights issues in Latin America.

    Shirin Neshat lives and works in New York City, where she married the Korean art curator Kyong Park; the two jointly ran the New York exhibition and performance space the Storefront for Art and Architecture. Neshat returned to Iran in 1990, eleven years after the Islamic Revolution. That trip led to her first body of work, the photographic series Women of Allah, consisting of conceptual narratives on the subject of female warriors during the Revolution. Neshat works in photography, video, film, and performance, often addressing the theme of the alienation of women in repressed Muslim societies.

    Lisa Ross is a photographer, video artist and educator living in New York City. Ross spent ten years traveling to the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous region as she explored the pilgrimage sites in and around the Taklamakan Desert. In 2013, her creative work culminated in an exhibition at The Rubin Museum of Art in New York and a book publication, both titled, Living Shrines of Uyghur China. The book is published by The Monacelli Press and distributed internationally by Random House.

    Carey Lovelace, curator, critic, journalist, and playwright, served as Co-Commissioner of the United States Pavilion for the 2013 Venice Biennale and was a 2010 Andrew and Marilyn Heiskell Fellow at the American Academy in Rome. Former Co-President of the International Association of Art Critics, U.S. Chapter, Lovelace has written for Art in America, Artforum, The New York Times, and the Performing Arts Journal, among many publications, and catalogue essays for institutions including The Drawing Center, the Grey Art Gallery, and The Bronx Museum of the Arts.

    Presented in conjunction with The Armory Show.

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  3. The Watermill Center hosted, in conjunction with the Peconic Teacher Center, a lecture by Norman Brosterman, noted author of the award-winning book, Inventing Kindergarten on Saturday, February 4 at 5:00 pm. With images drawn from his extensive collection of antique kindergarten material, including a great deal of design work made by 19th century women teachers, Norman Brosterman spoke on kindergarten’s remarkable history and how it gave women a far greater role in the educational establishment. He also discussed how the use of Froebel blocks - geometric toys designed in Germany in the 1830's by Friedrich Froebel, the inventor of Kindergarten – influenced the development of abstract art and modern architecture by introducing the likes of Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, Vassily Kandinsky, Piet Mondrian, and Georges Braque to the viability of geometric abstraction.

    # vimeo.com/36617127 Uploaded
  4. The Watermill Center hosted, in conjunction with the Peconic Teacher Center, a lecture by Norman Brosterman, noted author of the award-winning book, Inventing Kindergarten on Saturday, February 4 at 5:00 pm. With images drawn from his extensive collection of antique kindergarten material, including a great deal of design work made by 19th century women teachers, Norman Brosterman spoke on kindergarten’s remarkable history and how it gave women a far greater role in the educational establishment. He also discussed how the use of Froebel blocks - geometric toys designed in Germany in the 1830's by Friedrich Froebel, the inventor of Kindergarten – influenced the development of abstract art and modern architecture by introducing the likes of Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, Vassily Kandinsky, Piet Mondrian, and Georges Braque to the viability of geometric abstraction.

    # vimeo.com/36878256 Uploaded

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