1. Nine months into the Spanish Civil War, on 26 April 1937, the Basque town of Gernika was the target of a large aerial bombing campaign carried out on behalf of Generals Emilio Mola and Francisco Franco by the German and Italian air forces. Over 75% of the town's built structures were entirely destroyed in the attack. In this video CRIC researchers Dr Dacia Viejo-Rose and Fiachra McDonagh explain how that attack quickly became imbued with symbolic meaning that turned it into a 'memory event'. They discuss the censorship that existed in Spain during the Franco period that prevented public commemorations of the event, how the anniversaries were marked by the Basque government in exile, and how from 1976 memory of the event began to be marked in Gernika.

    This video introduces some of the ideas explored in a forthcoming book chapter by Dr Dacia Viejo-Rose and Fiachra McDonagh entitled: "Memorial Markers: Commemorating the bombing of Gernika"**
    With thanks to:
    The Gernika Gogoratuz Peace Research Centre and Gernikazarra Historia Taldea
    For further information on CRIC Spain case studies: Mourning and Memory, go to:
    http://www.cric.arch.cam.ac.uk/index.php?id=8
    For CRIC's youtube film, "Reconstructing Spain":
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iyt55Od7YUE&context=C351edc3ADOEgsToPDskKb...

    For CRIC's VIMEO CHANNEL, including a presentation on the continuing reconstruction of Dresden and the city's troubled anniversary events :vimeo.com/33733958

    Credits:
    Animation: Prosper Unger-Hamilton
    © Film CRIC research project.
    The CRIC Research project is funded by the European Commission within the Seventh Framework Programme

    # vimeo.com/35792002 Uploaded 489 Plays 0 Comments
  2. Using archival research including city records, maps , newspapers, photographs and television coverage Matthias Neutzner analyses the emergence of Dresden as an international site of memory after its wartime destruction and the creation of the city's memorial landscape amid intense political manipulation from 1945 until the present day. No where else in Germany has a city had such a difficult and continuous culture of remembrance. Mass rallies were arranged during the GDR era and recently thousands of Neo-Nazis , far left and civic counter groups have demonstrated in Dresden on the 13th February bombing anniversary.

    The CRIC Research Project is funded by the European Commission within the Seventh Framework Programme.

    # vimeo.com/33733958 Uploaded 1,057 Plays 0 Comments
  3. 'The Cemetery of France'
    The title of this film cites the words used by French President Michel Lebrun in 1932 to describe the battlefield of Verdun, site in 1916 of one of the most brutal battles of the Great War.
    The CRIC Research Project has studied the post-war reconstruction of the battlefield and in this film, researcher Dr Paola Filippucci discusses some of the findings of the project.
    As she explains, partly because of the extent of destruction the battlefield was declared off-limits for ordinary settlement and turned into a forest, containing only burials, memorial monuments and vestiges of the battlefield.
    The post-war history of the battlefield landscape shows that since its reconstruction in the 1920s, the forest has matured and developed significant biodiversity, with many rare plant and animal species thriving in some of the man-made wartime vestiges (shell-holes, forts and dugouts).
    This creates today a new type of heritage value on the battlefield, and as we move towards the centenary of the Great War in 2014, it gives rise to new debates about how to protect and valorise this landscape so as to harmonise historical and natural heritage.
    This case study shows that reconstruction after conflict is a very long-term process, that leaves a material legacy that continues to change and to interrogate later generations after the disappearance of direct survivors.

    The CRIC Research Project, directed from the McDonald Institute at the University of Cambridge, is funded by the European Commission within the Seventh Framework Programme.
    For more information on CRIC's case studies in France go to:
    http://www.cric.arch.cam.ac.uk/index.php?id=44

    For CRIC' DRESDEN'S MEMORIAL LANDSCAPE AND PROBLEMATIC YEARLY REMEMBRANCE DEMONSTRATIONS:vimeo.com/33733958

    CREDITS:
    With thanks to CRIC research colleague Professor Jean-Paul Amat
    Filmed at Jesus College, University of Cambridge.
    Animation: Prosper Unger-Hamilton
    Producer: Lindy Fleming

    # vimeo.com/35604889 Uploaded 712 Plays 0 Comments
  4. When the Spanish Civil War ended, on the 1^st of April 1939, a General Directorate for Devastated Regions and Reparations was set up to administer the reconstruction of the country. Soon a law was created by which those towns most severely damaged during the war were 'adopted' by the regime. Gernika was amongst the first towns to be adopted. In this short video, CRIC project researcher Dr Dacia Viejo-Rose briefly describes how the reconstruction of Gernika was taken up, focusing on the town's main square, its Foru Plaza, she traces the history of its rebuilding and how a changing political context affected the meaning of the square. As the centre of the town and locus for buildings housing key administrative and political functions the square's story is particularly revealing of how the reconstruction was imbued with ideological significance.

    This video introduces some of the ideas explored in a forthcoming book chapter entitled: " Something Old, Something New: The Materiality of Tradition and Power in the Post-civil War Reconstruction of Gernika's Foru Plaza".

    With thanks to:
    The Gernika Gogoratuz Peace Research Centre and Gernikazarra Historia Taldea

    For further information on CRIC Spain case studies: Mourning and Memory, go to:
    http://www.cric.arch.cam.ac.uk/index.php?id=8

    For other CRIC films including "Reconstructing Spain" go to :http://www.youtube.com/user/CRICResearchProject

    For CRIC's Dresden research presentation go to:
    vimeo.com/33733958
    Credits:
    Animation: Prosper Unger-Hamilton
    Filmed at Jesus College, University of Cambridge.
    The CRIC Research Project is funded by the European Commission within the Seventh Framework Programme.

    # vimeo.com/35602477 Uploaded 486 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Do memorials matter? If so in what way?

    This film shows some of the wide ranging and strongly held public views in Cambridge on memorials and anniversary events; which are relevant, valued and used.

    With preparations for the 2014 anniversary well underway, CRIC Director Dr Marie Louise Stig Sorensen, from the University of Cambridge said it was a particularly relevant time to hear from the public.
    More than three hundred people got involved over a fortnight, discussing and posting their opinions in memory boxes placed around Cambridge. A cross section of ages was targeted, with college students providing some of the more unexpected reactions . At the final public workshop, the boxes were opened, answers unwrapped and the research process discussed.
    The CRIC project has examined the reconstruction of societies after war through case studies in Europe at symbolic sites such as Srebrenica, Dresden, Verdun and Gernika. The role of memorials and anniversary events is seen as central to understanding how memories of conflict are kept alive and influence recovery from loss and trauma. CRIC research has documented the impact when this heritage is manipulated to serve changing ideological and political needs.
    Dr Sorensen says "the way war is interpreted in public influences our understanding of that conflict. It is important to recognise that memorial practices have a number of outcomes. Instead of releasing societies from a legacy of violence, they can cement divisions, thereby fueling further conflict "
    CRIC researchers gave presentations with examples of the selective versions of history memorials can transmit, the long term destructive effects when memorials "take sides" after conflict and the continuing upheaval caused to one city (Dresden) in the struggle over conflicting interpretations of the its wartime suffering.
    For more information on this , one of the most "problematic" remembrance cultures in Europe today see CRIC's Dresden youtube film. For examples of the changing interpretations of disputed heritage see, the Isted Lion and Bosnia youtube films.
    The CRIC research project is directed from the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge and funded from the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme.

    Camera and editing: Simon Keating, Bitesize films
    Animation: Prosper Unger-Hamilton
    Copyright: CRIC research project

    # vimeo.com/33753608 Uploaded 465 Plays 0 Comments

CRIC Research Project

CRIC Research

CRIC is a European research project directed from the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge studying the impact of the destruction and reconstruction of cultural heritage on societies after war. CRIC ( Cultural…


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CRIC is a European research project directed from the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge studying the impact of the destruction and reconstruction of cultural heritage on societies after war. CRIC ( Cultural Heritage and the Reconstruction of Identities after Conflict) has case studies in Spain, Bosnia, France, Germany and Cyprus. This four-year project is funded by the European Commission within the Seventh Framework Programme.
For further videos also go to the CRIC Research Project youtube channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/CRICResearchProject

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