1. Jessie Divens Nicholas talks about the legacy of men involved in the Civil Rights Movement such as C.C. Bryant. She talks about those who do not learn about the Movement are being cheated. Nicholas talks about her personal experience with integration.
    07/27/04

    # vimeo.com/36111841 Uploaded 28 Plays 0 Comments
  2. Rembert sums her involvement with the civil rights movement as a young person. She talks about how she and her father would type up fliers and other documents for CC Bryant and Bob Moses.
    07/27/04

    # vimeo.com/36109855 Uploaded 46 Plays 0 Comments
  3. Chesser was elected as chair of the committee to improve Amite County education. C.C. Bryant was a mentor to her during this time, and she organized a protest asking parents to leave their children at home if they were enrolled in the Amite County schools. 06/21/06.

    # vimeo.com/26982414 Uploaded 8 Plays 0 Comments
  4. Dr. Susan Glisson presents an award to C.C. Bryant, and C.C. Bryant gives an acceptance speech.

    "The Legacy of Slavery" was presented at the University of Mississippi on 10/25/05.

    The full text of the lecture can be found here: winterinstitute.org/pages/legacy.htm

    # vimeo.com/28112194 Uploaded 9 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Judith Barlow's documentary "The Troublemaker" about her grandfather, C.C. Bryant.

    "The Legacy of Slavery" was presented at the University of Mississippi on 10/25/05.

    The full text of the lecture can be found here: winterinstitute.org/pages/legacy.htm

    # vimeo.com/28111781 Uploaded 33 Plays 0 Comments

C.C. Bryant

Winter Institute PRO

NAACP stalwart C.C. Bryant and his wife, Emogene, have lived in the same home for more than fifty years. Bryant's barbershop, which was adjacent to the home, was a center for information about the struggle for black equality. There, patrons could read…


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NAACP stalwart C.C. Bryant and his wife, Emogene, have lived in the same home for more than fifty years. Bryant's barbershop, which was adjacent to the home, was a center for information about the struggle for black equality. There, patrons could read books about Africa, talk about voter registration or police brutality in the early days of the Movement, and read Black Press magazines and newspapers. Movement workers often went to the shop for haircuts as well as to meet local people.

When NAACP Field Secretary Medgar Evers visited McComb, he stayed in Bryant's home, as did SNCC Field Secretary and Freedom Summer organizer Bob Moses. The barbershop was destroyed in a bombing in April 1964, and the house was bombed in June of that year.

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