1. in this video Fent Deweese discusses race relations during the time of the integration of his high school and in his life and compares them to those of today. 04/05/04.

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  2. After Carolyn Matthews learned about the murders of the civil rights workers and its association with the civil rights movement she began to notice how non-peaceful situations were. She began to question why black and white youth didn’t attend each other’s sporting events and other things. Matthews also speaks on the effects the murders had on her family and other people of the town. 06/22/06.

    # vimeo.com/27598116 Uploaded 42 Plays 0 Comments
  3. Helen discusses how she is leaving her life story behind for her kids to pass down. Also she shares what it was like to go to school during the segregated era and reiterates why education is so important. 06/19/04.

    # vimeo.com/27597799 Uploaded 10 Plays 0 Comments
  4. Nettie Ann Cox remembers how the atmosphere in Neshoba County changed after the bodies of the murdered civil rights workers were found. 04/05/04.

    # vimeo.com/27597417 Uploaded 103 Plays 0 Comments

Booker T. Washington School

Winter Institute PRO

The first school for black children in the city of Philadelphia was held in the Black Masonic Lodge just off Wilson Street. Mr. and Mrs. Ed Stephens organized the school with Mrs. Stephens being one of the first teachers. The school's name was Neshoba…


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The first school for black children in the city of Philadelphia was held in the Black Masonic Lodge just off Wilson Street. Mr. and Mrs. Ed Stephens organized the school with Mrs. Stephens being one of the first teachers. The school's name was Neshoba County School. The next location for the black school was on the east side of the railroad track, just off Rea Street, where the feed mill is now located. The three-room structure, which was built in the late 1920s, was financed by the Rosenwald Foundation. In 1917, Julius Rosenwald created the Rosenwald Foundation to help build schools for African-Americans in the decades before the end of segregation. He encouraged blacks and whites to work together to build the schools. His foundation helped to build more than 5,300 structures across the rural South, with the second highest number in Mississippi. Of the almost 600 structures in the state, only eleven remain. Small additions to this school were made, including a home economics class and an industrial shop. The name of the school was changed in 1939 to Neshoba County Training School. A new building was ready for occupancy for the 1948-1949 term. Mr. Watts was principal and the school's name was changed to Booker T. Washington. In the early 1950s a band program was established and named the Booker T. Washington Hornets. At this same time, an organized athletic program was begun. Due to integration, the school closed in 1970 and was vacant for several years. Today, it houses the Philadelphia Head Start, and the gym is used for parks and recreation activities.

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