1. (Part 2 of 3 writing modules) In this module I discuss how to make your language clear, concrete, and compelling.

    Recorded on 9 November 2010

    This video is part of an online lecture series coordinated by APECS, US NSF ARCSS Thermokarst Project, and the University of Canterbury to help early career polar researchers navigate their careers. For more information on the full series, visit apecs.is/webinars.

    Presenter: Dr. Josh Schimel, Chair, Environmental Studies Program & Professor, Dept. Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University of California Santa Barbara, USA

    Dr. Joshua Schimel’s research lies at the intersection of microbial and ecosystem ecology. His work focuses on how the environment controls the composition of microbial communities in soil and how, in turn, those microbes regulate whole ecosystem processes such as greenhouse gas emissions, nutrient cycling, and plant productivity. A major thrust of Dr. Schimel’s work has been in the Arctic, where there are large pools of decomposable carbon in the soils and the climate is warming rapidly. His work is focused on understanding how climate change will alter the release of carbon dioxide, methane, and nutrients from Arctic peat soils and how that will alter the composition and size of plant communities across the landscape. One important aspect of this work has been investigating winter processes, since soil biology does not shut down during the long Arctic winter, and these processes are important in Arctic biogeochemistry. Other aspects of Dr. Schimel’s research are focused on California ecosystems, trying to understand how the stress of the long summer drought regulates soil microbes, and how the replacement of native plants with invasive Mediterranean annual grasses has altered biogeochemical cycles, such as the availability of nutrients in the soils.

    Dr. Schimel has been active in U.S. science planning, particularly in the Arctic. He is currently Chair of the Arctic System Science Steering Committee and is a former Chair of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Office of Polar Programs Advisory Committee. Dr. Schimel also has served on the NSF Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education, working on developing plans for future interdisciplinary environmental initiatives. At the University of California, Santa Barbara, Dr. Schimel is chair of the Environmental Studies Program and has served as chair of the University Council of Graduate Student Affairs.

    # vimeo.com/17433480 Uploaded 781 Plays 0 Comments
  2. (Part 3 of 3 writing modules) In this module I discuss how to put the pieces together so that 
your writing draws the reader along, making points and relationships clear and powerful. How to use the language to make the story work.

    Recorded on 16 November 2010

    This video is part of an online lecture series coordinated by APECS, US NSF ARCSS Thermokarst Project, and the University of Canterbury to help early career polar researchers navigate their careers. For more information on the full series, visit apecs.is/webinars.

    Presenter: Dr. Josh Schimel, Chair, Environmental Studies Program & Professor, Dept. Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University of California Santa Barbara, USA

    Dr. Joshua Schimel’s research lies at the intersection of microbial and ecosystem ecology. His work focuses on how the environment controls the composition of microbial communities in soil and how, in turn, those microbes regulate whole ecosystem processes such as greenhouse gas emissions, nutrient cycling, and plant productivity. A major thrust of Dr. Schimel’s work has been in the Arctic, where there are large pools of decomposable carbon in the soils and the climate is warming rapidly. His work is focused on understanding how climate change will alter the release of carbon dioxide, methane, and nutrients from Arctic peat soils and how that will alter the composition and size of plant communities across the landscape. One important aspect of this work has been investigating winter processes, since soil biology does not shut down during the long Arctic winter, and these processes are important in Arctic biogeochemistry. Other aspects of Dr. Schimel’s research are focused on California ecosystems, trying to understand how the stress of the long summer drought regulates soil microbes, and how the replacement of native plants with invasive Mediterranean annual grasses has altered biogeochemical cycles, such as the availability of nutrients in the soils.

    Dr. Schimel has been active in U.S. science planning, particularly in the Arctic. He is currently Chair of the Arctic System Science Steering Committee and is a former Chair of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Office of Polar Programs Advisory Committee. Dr. Schimel also has served on the NSF Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education, working on developing plans for future interdisciplinary environmental initiatives. At the University of California, Santa Barbara, Dr. Schimel is chair of the Environmental Studies Program and has served as chair of the University Council of Graduate Student Affairs.

    # vimeo.com/17433887 Uploaded 523 Plays 0 Comments
  3. The Art of the Poster Session was presented by Kristin Timm, ARCUS, and Jenny Baeseman, Director of APECS. As many people are preparing for AGU and other conferences coming up, there is likely a lot of work being done to fit as much information on to that poster presentation as possible... this webinar will provide some simple tips on making a good poster and how to attract the most visitors.

    For a pdf version of these slides, including a list of resources is available here: apecs.is/images/stories/files/postersessions_12072010_notes.pdf

    Recorded on 7 December 2010

    This video is part of an online lecture series coordinated by APECS, US NSF ARCSS Thermokarst Project, and the University of Canterbury to help early career polar researchers navigate their careers. For more information on the full series, visit apecs.is/webinars.

    Presenters:

    Kristin Timm is a Project Manager at the Arctic Research Consortium of the US (ARCUS) and works on a project called PolarTREC, which matches teachers with researchers for research experiences in the polar regions (polartrec.com). With a background in education, community development, and natural resources management, her interests lie in science communication, teacher/researcher collaborations, and global climate change education. She recently finished my bachelor's degree at the University of Alaska Fairbanks in Rural Development with an emphasis in Land, Resource, and Environmental Management. She am planning on beginning a master's degree soon to further my studies in climate change education and teacher researcher collaborations. When not working or at school she enjoy backcountry skiing and snowmachining, floating rivers, cooking, making art, and traveling with her husband, Jake, and their two dogs.

    Jenny Baeseman is the Founding Director of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists based in Tromsø, Norway. Her training includes a B.S. in Water Chemistry from the University of WI - Stevens Point, M.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Minnesota, a Ph.D. also in Civil Engineering with an environmental emphasis from the University of Colorado, and postdoctoral training in geosciences at Princeton University. During her training, she has spent 3 summer seasons in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica and has a deep appreciation and interest in the Polar Regions. After being an Assistant Professor in Microbial Ecology, she decided to leave academia to take APECS to the next level. This journey took her to the International Arctic Research Center (IARC) at the University of Alaska – Fairbanks, where she currently holds an affiliate assistant research professorship and now to the University of Tromsø, the home of the APECS International Office.

    One of Jenny's personal goals is to make sure everyone she meets knows that polar bears don't eat penguins - as they live in different polar regions.

    # vimeo.com/17646765 Uploaded 967 Plays 0 Comments
  4. In this seminar Dr. Kofinas addresses considerations when working within Northern communities—such as going through the proper channels to obtain permission to work in the communities, identifying and coordinating with local interests, ways to ensure involvement of the local community in the research, how to reciprocate knowledge back to the community, and how to ensure personal safety for researchers working in remote communities.

    Recorded on 23 November 2010

    This video is part of an online lecture series coordinated by APECS, US NSF ARCSS Thermokarst Project, and the University of Canterbury to help early career polar researchers navigate their careers. For more information on the full series, visit apecs.is/webinars.

    Gary Kofinas, Associate Professor of Resource Policy and Management at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, with a joint appointment in the School of Natural Resources & Agricultural Science and the Institute of Arctic Biology. Gary’s research has focused on community resilience and sustainability, addressing questions of adaptive co-management of wildlife, community-based ecological monitoring, and participatory modeling and scenario analysis in planning. He has served as Coordinator and Director/PI of University of Alaska-Fairbank’s Resilience and Adaptation Program (an NSF IGERT), which offers PhD- and masters-level education and training in sustainability science. He is co-editor of Principles of Ecosystem Services: Resilience-Based Resource Management (Springer-Verlag Press 2009). Gary received his PhD from the University of British Columbia in Interdisciplinary Studies/Resource Management Science.

    # vimeo.com/18310492 Uploaded 153 Plays 0 Comments
  5. In this webinar, Torre Jorgenson (Senior Scientist at ABR Environmental Research and Services) and Alice Orlich (Graduate student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks International Arctic Research Center) share with participants tips on working in extreme Arctic conditions and insight regarding what types of things to consider when planning and coordinating fieldwork logistics in polar regions. Since every country has their own particular requirements, this webinar focuses mainly on overall guidance on field work.

    Recorded 26 October 2010.

    This video is part of an online lecture series coordinated by APECS, US NSF ARCSS Thermokarst Project, and the University of Canterbury to help early career polar researchers navigate their careers. For more information on the full series, visit apecs.is/webinars.

    Presented by Torre Jorgenson, Senior Scientist, Alaska Biological Research, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA

    Torre Jorgenson leads ABR’s Ecological Land Survey Program and has directed and participated in more than 100 Alaska studies involving vegetation classification and mapping, permafrost and geomorphology, restoration, bioremediation, climate change, and wetland science. His most recent research has focused on the development of ecological land classifications of military lands and national parks throughout Alaska, which have employed analysis of satellite imagery, true-color and infrared photography, ground-truthing, and GIS spatial analysis to develop maps suitable for land-use assessments. Torre also has been involved in assessing effects of global warming on sea-level rise and ecological changes on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, coastal erosion along the Beaufort Sea coast, permafrost degradation in central and northern Alaska, and monitoring landscape change through repeat photography in southwestern Alaska.

    # vimeo.com/18279756 Uploaded 259 Plays 0 Comments

APECS Career Development Webinars

APECS Webinars Plus

The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) is currently working with mentors and partners to develop a webinar series for our members in order to assist them with their career development goals. Whether you want to learn how to better communicate…


+ More

The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) is currently working with mentors and partners to develop a webinar series for our members in order to assist them with their career development goals. Whether you want to learn how to better communicate with the media, write a proposal, get into grad school, or get a job, this is the channel for you!

Learn about upcoming live sessions at apecs.is/webinars

Browse This Channel

Shout Box

Heads up: the shoutbox will be retiring soon. It’s tired of working, and can’t wait to relax. You can still send a message to the channel owner, though!

Channels are a simple, beautiful way to showcase and watch videos. Browse more Channels.