1. You are lying on a blanket on a clear summer night and gazing at the dark starry sky. You are trying to spot the big dipper, Andromeda, or maybe Orion. However you are noticing strange bright patches aligned in a band across the night sky and realize they are not stars: it is our home town, our own galaxy, the milky way. That’s how all star-gazing experiences, hobbies, but also the history of astronomy began: from naked eye observations thousands of years ago, to the finest and biggest telescopes today, capable of unravelling the most intriguing secrets of the universe. As the hobby or science grows and evolves, we always want to go deeper and zoom in. You are now seeing not only our galaxy, but billions of them!



    With the first opus of the short film series ‘Galaxies’, I wanted to experiment and take the astro-timelapse technique to the next level. There are a lot of sumptuous short films and very technical time-lapses featuring the milky way, but I found very little variation in this field. Most of the time they show a wide-angle view of the milky way, albeit majestic, rising or setting against various foregrounds. This is the reason why I wanted to rethink the whole process, find different angles, get more detail. Why not zoom in? Why not consider other deep-sky objects like other galaxies? Why not show our very space home address and neighborhood in a very different way?

    

I started thinking about making time-lapse of deep-sky objects about three years ago when I bought my tracker. I would experiment and track the Andromeda galaxy moving in front of rocks, monuments, trees, behind northern lights. I extended the limits of wide-field astro-timelapse (10-35mm) to a more middle (50-85mm) and narrow-field (> 85mm). It gives a lot of new options and reveals the true beauty and detail of our galactic core fore example. 


    The main canvas of the project is based on our galaxy and their neighbors (Andromeda, the Magellanic clouds..), but also a lot more deep-sky objects like nebulas, star clusters etc… Amateurs and professionals will certainly recognize a multitude of them like the North-American nebula, the Orion nebula, the Rosette nebula, the Carina nebula, the dark horse nebula, the Andromeda galaxy in different situations like photobombed by northern lights or moving behind the tree canopy, the majestic milky way core either rising or in very fine detail moving fleeting gently across the nigh sky… You will still find some wide-angle milky way scenes, because you just cannot pass on them!

    My two favorite parts of the project (and the most technically difficult) were shooting the Andromeda galaxy in the aurorae for one, and shooting a scene of the Orion constellation along with its nebulae, including nature and the zodiacal lights for the other. The former was hard to realize because of my location at the time of shoot (Denmark) since we don’t get aurorae too often. I needed to find a calm night (no wind for tracking), with an aurora storm but not too bright either (so one can still see the detail in the galaxy). It also needs to be at that time year when Andromeda passes low on the horizon, coinciding with the space where northern lights would appear. It was the most technical time-lapse I have ever done so far, but the most rewarding! The latter was also difficult, but paid off incredibly well. My goal was to get the red of the emission nebulae in the region of Orion that would still be visible in single pictures of the time-lapse, since you cannot stack and bring out detail! I astro-modified my Canon 6D to get the shot, and included the beautiful zodiacal lights towards the west, and even got a surprise visitor (grey heron) if you can spot it!

    
I shot a various locations to get a variety of shots: Denmark (northern light, Andromeda, some milky way), Malawi (Milky way core and nebulas), France (star trails), Tenerife (Milky way core and wide-field), Vermont (wide field milky way) and Slovenia (milky way). Since I basically started this project a few years back when I began with astrophotography, some scenes still contain annoying flickering or weren’t as sharp as the ones I get now, but all in all I am truly amazed by the result and I really hope you can appreciate this new view on astro time-lapse. I should mention that this kind of technique demands a lot of work on thinking, preparing, executing and post-processing, and it took me about two years to achieve it.



    Material: 
Canon 6D (Baader modded), Sony a7rII, Sony a7s
    Multiple lenses ranging from 10mm to 500mm
    iOptron Skyguider tracker
Pre-processed in Lr and post-processed in Final Cut Pro X


    You can find more information about the film at adphotography-online.com. Thank you for watching and I hope you enjoyed the marvels of galaxies as much as I did. Don’t hesitate to like, comment, share and of course follow me for more 4K videos!

    # vimeo.com/215085008 Uploaded 19.9K Plays 12 Comments
  2. This film was shot over 11 nights in March on La Palma, Canary Islands.

    La Palma is often called ‘Europes’ Hawaii’ as it has all the ingredients for a perfect night sky cocktail; altitude, dry air and a lack of light pollution. These elements when combined make for a stunning night sky. Because of it’s clean air and clear skies many of the worlds top observatories have facilities on top of the island.

    The main goal of this film was to capture the Milky Way rising from the horizon at a low angle across the sky. There are two main factors that affect the position of the Milky Way; latitude and time of year.

    Latitude is your distance either North or South from the Earth’s equator. In the Northern Hemisphere the closer you are to the equator the higher the central core of the Milky Way will rise into the sky. La Palma is positioned at 28˚ North, which is a good latitude to photograph the central core of the Milky Way.

    Time of year affects the angle in which the Milky Ways appears in the sky. The general consensus is that the Milky Way season starts in March and ends in October. In March the angle in which the Milky Way rises in the Northern Hemisphere is at its’ most acute. As Spring turns into Summer the Milky Ways angle increases tilting until it is upright through the months of June to August, then falls away back on itself slightly through September to November until the core disappears from view through the Winter months.

    To achieve the correct angle I had to visit as early as possible in the season and with the new Moon phase of March being the week of the 6th the plan was set. You would think that with La Palma being at a latitude that is on par with Northern Africa the conditions would be favourable any time of the year, but with altitude and the trade winds blowing in, this was not the case.

    I was hiking with a heavy pack back at altitude through very high winds, it was possibly the toughest conditions I have ever encountered in my time shooting astrophotography. But funnily enough it was not the wind, altitude or the cold that was the hardest part, the real test was having the endurance to wait out in these conditions for the Milky Way to rise which happens in March at around 3am. It is safe to say that after 11 consecutive nights of hiking from dusk and shooting until dawn I was a little broken, but adventure only truly starts when you are faced with challenges, when you overcome them, you remember these moments with far more clarity over anything else.

    To view more of my work please visit:
    nicholasbuer.com

    Follow me:
    instagram.com/nicholasbuer
    facebook.com/nicholasbuerphotography

    All Footage Copyright © 2016 Nicholas Buer
    All Rights Reserved

    # vimeo.com/189546757 Uploaded 114K Plays 44 Comments
  3. The local people call it the ‘blue time’ - the period in winter when the sun doesn’t rise above the horizon in northern areas of Scandinavia. Jeff Allen visits northern Norway every year, in both winter and summer, to break out of the world of credit cards and double glazing that society has become and explore the breath-taking wilderness and coastline by sea kayak with longtime friend Bjørn Eines. In more recent years, he has taken up dog sledding under the experienced wing of Tore Albrigtsen and now guides expeditions to the region to let others witness the beauty of his favourite place on earth.

    Official Selection 4th International Motion Festival Cyprus 2017

    Directed, filmed and edited by Greg Dennis
    Supported by Sideways - sideways.tv
    Original Score composed by Chris Davey - chrisdaveyfilm.com
    Voice of Jeff Allen - expeditionpaddler.com
    With Thanks to Bjørn Eines and Tore Albrigtsen

    # vimeo.com/178498990 Uploaded 87.9K Plays 25 Comments
  4. I have recently returned from two trips to the Nordland region of Norway, specifically Lofoten. This time of the year is influenced by the Midnight Sun or Midnattsol. The days don't end with the sun never disappearing below the horizon. I always wondered what it would be like to fly around and film these mountains when I first visited this place and on this trip I finally got the opportunity to do so.

    Along with fellow drone pilot Alan Mathieson from Outback Drones I have put together a short compilation of some of the scenes we were able to capture using the incredible DJI Phantom 4. This is the fourth generation Phantom I have owned and the advances from my very first Phantom 1 are staggering. Terrain avoidance, return to home, point of interest, no fly zones, and other features make this the easiest and safest drone yet. It is also the easiest drone to travel with. It's small form factor and light weight make it a dream to carry onto a plane and the batteries are small enough in power output to not alarm security offices at airports all over the world.

    Lofoten is incredible. A beautiful landscape made on a hollywood set. Surely it cant be real? The conditions we encountered made flying a dream. Light winds and low cloud everywhere. A scale to a suitable vantage point and we were in the box seat.

    This is just a taste of some of the most incredible footage I have ever shot with a drone and the reason for posting this clip purely with drone footage. My very first all drone video in fact. And whats even cooler is I'm posting this clip on the fourth anniversary of getting my very first drone.

    Thanks to good friend Alan Mathieson from Outback Drones for shooting this piece with me and keeping all our flight ops controlled and safe. It's a pleasure to operate with a professional drone operator.

    Also special mention to my music score partner in crime Jo Quail who as always allowed me to use her incredible music in another one of my projects of passion.

    I'm hooked on flying drones after this trip and cant wait to get back in February next year to fly these amazing alps totally covered in snow.

    Enjoy.

    Alan Mathieson "Outback Drones" outbackdrones.com.au
    Jo Quail Extract from "Between Two Waves" from the album "Five Incantations" Buy the album here joquail.bandcamp.com/album/five-incantations

    # vimeo.com/178300706 Uploaded 158K Plays 81 Comments
  5. Located at the corner of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, Yellowstone, America's first National Park, sits on one of the most powerful supervolcanoes on the planet. Yellowstone Caldera last erupted approximately 64 million years ago, sending pyroclastic flows across hundreds of miles in diameter, and covering most of North America with a thick layer of ash. Carried by weather, ash and other particles covered the globe, causing a year-long blackout, and resulting in a devastating nuclear winter.

    Today, Yellowstone provides the visitors a spectacle of geothermal features and prismatic colors as pressure underneath builds to eventual geyser explosions across the basin. This breathtaking volcanic ritual serves as reminder that some of the most beautiful parts of nature and often the most dangerous.

    Dedicated to Colin Nathaniel Scott who died at Yellowstone just days after this video was made.

    This video was filmed as part of SKYGLOW (skyglowproject.com), an ongoing crowdfunded quest to explore the effects and dangers of urban light pollution in contrast with some of the most incredible dark sky areas in North America. This project is being produced in collaboration with International Dark-Sky Association (darksky.org), a non-profit fighting for the preservation of night skies around the globe.

    The film was shot on Canon 5DSR & 5DIII cameras & lenses sponsored by Canon USA, aided by Alpine Labs' Michron, powered by Paul C. Buff Vagabond Mini. LRTimelapse was used to process some of the shots.

    High resolution stills can be found here: dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/24210546/JPEG/SKYGLOW-HADES%20EXHALES-STILLS.zip

    Credits:
    Producer/Editor/Shooter: Harun Mehmedinovic
    Producer: Emina Becirovic
    Music: Mark Petrie

    Special Thanks:
    Gavin Heffernan and Travelers Insurance
    Semezdin & Sanja Mehmedinovic
    Matt Walker & Pierangelo Pirak
    Aaron McNally & Canon USA
    Kevin Noble & Paul C. Buff Inc.
    Greg Horvath & Alpine Labs
    International Dark-Sky Association
    Northern Arizona University
    States Of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho

    Locations:
    Yellowstone National Park, WY/MT/ID

    *****You can support SKYGLOW by visiting WWW.SKYGLOWPROJECT.COM. All your support goes to creation of more videos and images.*****

    Follow/Contact:
    Facebook facebook.com/skyglowproject
    Instagram: instagram.com/skyglowproject
    Email: info@skyglowproject.com

    We appreciate all your shares, comments and likes, thanks for checking out this video!

    This video is COPYRIGHT 2016 Harun Mehmedinovic / SKYGLOWPROJECT.COM. Any use beyond embedding this video in it's unaltered form and properly credited to SKYGLOW PROJECT/SKYGLOWPROJECT.COM on another website requires permission from the creator. Any use of the entirety or portion(s) of this video to drive advertising traffic, sales or any other profit-driven venture on a third party website without express permission from the content creator will result in prosecution to the full extent of the law.

    # vimeo.com/179772650 Uploaded 74.8K Plays 11 Comments

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Jesús Tramullas

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    "Timelapsing" the superstorm in Brisbane CBD, Australia, more than 25.000 lighting strikes in one day! Just have some of them hehe!

    by Telling Life

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