1. ARTISTS
    Abdelhai Bennani (tenor saxophone); Itaru Oki (trumpet, bugle, flutes, Indian flute, yokobue); Alan Silva (contrabass); Makoto Sato (drums)

    Abdou Bennani had already noticed in 1998 when the CD release "Childhood" in margin. Follower of a pure and serene that emphasizes listening and fluidity, it is to remind us of the essential role of poetry and the creative act in improvised music. A breath of well-being ...
    orn in Fez (Morocco) in 1950, Abdelhai Bennani is initiated in childhood to traditional rhythms simple to participate in the festivities. About ten, eleven, he discovered Western music on radio and jazz discs. But it is a few years later, through the discs of Jimi Hendrix, he meets a popular music using improvisation as expression system. After spending his tray, he went to Marseille to study biology. At the end of his studies, he realized that music is essential for him to communicate. Also, at the age of thirty, he decided to devote himself to the saxophone and moved to Paris. From 1983 to 1985, he attended the IACP (Institut Art Culture Perception) and got acquainted with its founder, Alan Silva . But, very attached to his culture where the mode of transmission is oral principlement, he rejects the written score and struggling to find musicians to play with.

    This is solo he recorded his first album Ensounded (1996, on the label margin of Gerard Terronès, distributed by Improjazz ). From 1996 to 1998, he toured with Camel Zekri guitarist and drummer Makoto Sato Africasia in the trio. He directed a project that is close to his heart, by recording the first album of Abdelhaï Bennani Quartet "Childhood" ( Margin / Improjazz , 1998) with his fellow traveler Alan Silva (bass), Makoto Sato (drums) and Itaru Oki ( trumpet).

    In recent months, Abdelhaï Bennani turns within the In The Tradition Quartet with Alan Silva (synth, piano), Johannes Bauer (trombone) and Roger Turner (drums, percussion).
    Category:jazzosphere.pagesperso-orange.fr/Galerie/Bennani/galerie%20Bennani.htm

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  2. ARTISTS
    Abdelhai Bennani (tenor saxophone); Itaru Oki (trumpet, bugle, flutes, Indian flute, yokobue); Alan Silva (contrabass); Makoto Sato (drums)

    Abdou Bennani had already noticed in 1998 when the CD release "Childhood" in margin. Follower of a pure and serene that emphasizes listening and fluidity, it is to remind us of the essential role of poetry and the creative act in improvised music. A breath of well-being ...
    orn in Fez (Morocco) in 1950, Abdelhai Bennani is initiated in childhood to traditional rhythms simple to participate in the festivities. About ten, eleven, he discovered Western music on radio and jazz discs. But it is a few years later, through the discs of Jimi Hendrix, he meets a popular music using improvisation as expression system. After spending his tray, he went to Marseille to study biology. At the end of his studies, he realized that music is essential for him to communicate. Also, at the age of thirty, he decided to devote himself to the saxophone and moved to Paris. From 1983 to 1985, he attended the IACP (Institut Art Culture Perception) and got acquainted with its founder, Alan Silva . But, very attached to his culture where the mode of transmission is oral principlement, he rejects the written score and struggling to find musicians to play with.

    This is solo he recorded his first album Ensounded (1996, on the label margin of Gerard Terronès, distributed by Improjazz ). From 1996 to 1998, he toured with Camel Zekri guitarist and drummer Makoto Sato Africasia in the trio. He directed a project that is close to his heart, by recording the first album of Abdelhaï Bennani Quartet "Childhood" ( Margin / Improjazz , 1998) with his fellow traveler Alan Silva (bass), Makoto Sato (drums) and Itaru Oki ( trumpet).

    In recent months, Abdelhaï Bennani turns within the In The Tradition Quartet with Alan Silva (synth, piano), Johannes Bauer (trombone) and Roger Turner (drums, percussion). jazzosphere.pagesperso-orange.fr/Galerie/Bennani/galerie%20Bennani.htm

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  3. Abdelhai Bennani (tenor saxophone); Itaru Oki (trumpet, bugle, flutes, Indian flute, yokobue); Alan Silva (contrabass); Makoto Sato (drums)

    Abdou Bennani had already noticed in 1998 when the CD release "Childhood" in margin. Follower of a pure and serene that emphasizes listening and fluidity, it is to remind us of the essential role of poetry and the creative act in improvised music. A breath of well-being ...
    orn in Fez (Morocco) in 1950, Abdelhai Bennani is initiated in childhood to traditional rhythms simple to participate in the festivities. About ten, eleven, he discovered Western music on radio and jazz discs. But it is a few years later, through the discs of Jimi Hendrix, he meets a popular music using improvisation as expression system. After spending his tray, he went to Marseille to study biology. At the end of his studies, he realized that music is essential for him to communicate. Also, at the age of thirty, he decided to devote himself to the saxophone and moved to Paris. From 1983 to 1985, he attended the IACP (Institut Art Culture Perception) and got acquainted with its founder, Alan Silva . But, very attached to his culture where the mode of transmission is oral principlement, he rejects the written score and struggling to find musicians to play with.

    This is solo he recorded his first album Ensounded (1996, on the label margin of Gerard Terronès, distributed by Improjazz ). From 1996 to 1998, he toured with Camel Zekri guitarist and drummer Makoto Sato Africasia in the trio. He directed a project that is close to his heart, by recording the first album of Abdelhaï Bennani Quartet "Childhood" ( Margin / Improjazz , 1998) with his fellow traveler Alan Silva (bass), Makoto Sato (drums) and Itaru Oki ( trumpet).

    In recent months, Abdelhaï Bennani turns within the In The Tradition Quartet with Alan Silva (synth, piano), Johannes Bauer (trombone) and Roger Turner (drums, percussion).
    Category:jazzosphere.pagesperso-orange.fr/Galerie/Bennani/galerie%20Benna­ni.htm

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  4. By DEREK TAYLOR, Published: February 1, 2000
    Calendar dates and the inceptions of musical styles don't always mix. When was the actual birth of bebop? When was the definitive beginning of fusion? Specific dates are not readily applicable to these historic milestones mainly because musical revolutions rarely transpire in strictly linear progressions. In the absence of absolute dates recordings are often assigned the distinction of denoting when styles surfaced. The work of the Free Form Improvisation Ensemble (FFIE) gathered on this disc is widely regarded among those that have actually heard it as the first instances of a completely spontaneous composition. Ornette Coleman is often cited as one of the earliest pioneers of free improvisation in jazz, but even his late 50s experiments contained elements of preconceived structure. By comparison the FFIE's entire rubric revolved around converging together without any kind of premeditated consensus as to where their music would take them.
    Whether the FFIE is indeed the first free form composing ensemble is debatable. Definitive firsts in music are always tenuous and subject to revision. What matters most about the FFIE is not whether they were the first group to delve into a particular approach to music, but the music they created itself. Fortunately for those of us who weren't around to experience the dozen or so performances that comprised their career as a unit this disc provides an excellent snapshot of both their sound and vision. Silva and Greene are perhaps the most recognizable names in the group, but the self-professed purpose of the ensemble is collective communication over individual voicing and each man serves as an isonomic cog in the organic machine.
    The recording clarity of "Eat Eat" suggests a studio environment. Unfolding across nearly half an hour length the piece is a beautiful encapsulation of the FFIE's esthetic. The players roam across a startling array of spontaneously devised rhythmic and harmonic structures merging modern classical structures with jazz-based improvisation. The effect is so smoothly rendered that the piece's lengthy duration dissipates rapidly without any feeling that the players are being too verbose in their creations. The final three tracks were garnered from a live concert performance at Judson Hall- a venue renowned for hosting performances by many of the guiding lights in free jazz during the 60s. The clarity of sound is again stunning considering the recordings' origins and vintage. "Composition 1" works off an enlivening series of duets first between Winter and Silva and later between Silva and Greene. Greene's piano harp is featured prominently and gives the music a dark, metallic edge in tandem with Silva's mercurial bow. On "Composition 2" Friedman's ravenous, wailing alto conjures a more jazz-grounded mood atop crashing drums and agitated piano. Sharp jagged tonalities are the opening focus on the ominous "Composition 3." Alto and then flute act as catalyzing agents across a transfiguring undercurrent of dense rhythms generated by Greene, Silva and Walker.
    As a document preserving this nearly forgotten group this disc succeeds immeasurably. Hints are made in the extensive liner notes of over forty hours of recordings made by the FFIE during the same time span as those presented here. If we're lucky portions of these tapes will be unearthed soon and made available providing listeners with an even more complete picture of the important work these five men were forging.
    Track Listing: Eat Eat/ Free Form Composition 1/ Free Form Composition 2/ Free Form Composition 3.
    Recorded: April 3, 1964 NYC and December 30, 1964, Judson Hall, NYC.
    Cadence Jazz Records are available directly from North Country Distributors (cadencebuilding.com)
    Personnel: Burton Greene- piano, piano harp; Gary William Friedman- alto saxophone; Jon Winter- flutes; Alan Silva- bass; Clarence Walker- drums.
    Record Label: CJR | Style: Modern Jazz
    /allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=5009
    cadencejazzrecords.com/albums/?album=786497335220
    Category:
    Music
    Tags:
    Improvisation Free Classical Flute Piano Musical Ensemble Duo
    License:
    Standard YouTube License

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  5. By DEREK TAYLOR, Published: February 1, 2000
    Calendar dates and the inceptions of musical styles don't always mix. When was the actual birth of bebop? When was the definitive beginning of fusion? Specific dates are not readily applicable to these historic milestones mainly because musical revolutions rarely transpire in strictly linear progressions. In the absence of absolute dates recordings are often assigned the distinction of denoting when styles surfaced. The work of the Free Form Improvisation Ensemble (FFIE) gathered on this disc is widely regarded among those that have actually heard it as the first instances of a completely spontaneous composition. Ornette Coleman is often cited as one of the earliest pioneers of free improvisation in jazz, but even his late 50s experiments contained elements of preconceived structure. By comparison the FFIE's entire rubric revolved around converging together without any kind of premeditated consensus as to where their music would take them.
    Whether the FFIE is indeed the first free form composing ensemble is debatable. Definitive firsts in music are always tenuous and subject to revision. What matters most about the FFIE is not whether they were the first group to delve into a particular approach to music, but the music they created itself. Fortunately for those of us who weren't around to experience the dozen or so performances that comprised their career as a unit this disc provides an excellent snapshot of both their sound and vision. Silva and Greene are perhaps the most recognizable names in the group, but the self-professed purpose of the ensemble is collective communication over individual voicing and each man serves as an isonomic cog in the organic machine.
    The recording clarity of "Eat Eat" suggests a studio environment. Unfolding across nearly half an hour length the piece is a beautiful encapsulation of the FFIE's esthetic. The players roam across a startling array of spontaneously devised rhythmic and harmonic structures merging modern classical structures with jazz-based improvisation. The effect is so smoothly rendered that the piece's lengthy duration dissipates rapidly without any feeling that the players are being too verbose in their creations. The final three tracks were garnered from a live concert performance at Judson Hall- a venue renowned for hosting performances by many of the guiding lights in free jazz during the 60s. The clarity of sound is again stunning considering the recordings' origins and vintage. "Composition 1" works off an enlivening series of duets first between Winter and Silva and later between Silva and Greene. Greene's piano harp is featured prominently and gives the music a dark, metallic edge in tandem with Silva's mercurial bow. On "Composition 2" Friedman's ravenous, wailing alto conjures a more jazz-grounded mood atop crashing drums and agitated piano. Sharp jagged tonalities are the opening focus on the ominous "Composition 3." Alto and then flute act as catalyzing agents across a transfiguring undercurrent of dense rhythms generated by Greene, Silva and Walker.
    As a document preserving this nearly forgotten group this disc succeeds immeasurably. Hints are made in the extensive liner notes of over forty hours of recordings made by the FFIE during the same time span as those presented here. If we're lucky portions of these tapes will be unearthed soon and made available providing listeners with an even more complete picture of the important work these five men were forging.
    Track Listing: Eat Eat/ Free Form Composition 1/ Free Form Composition 2/ Free Form Composition 3.
    Recorded: April 3, 1964 NYC and December 30, 1964, Judson Hall, NYC.
    Cadence Jazz Records are available directly from North Country Distributors (cadencebuilding.com)
    Personnel: Burton Greene- piano, piano harp; Gary William Friedman- alto saxophone; Jon Winter- flutes; Alan Silva- bass; Clarence Walker- drums.
    Record Label: CJR | Style: Modern Jazz
    /allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=5009
    cadencejazzrecords.com/albums/?album=786497335220
    Category:
    Music
    Tags:
    Improvisation Free Classical Flute Piano Musical Ensemble Duo
    License:
    Standard YouTube License

    Uploaded 42 Plays 0 Comments

F.R.E.EjazzART Vid

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World Fusion ART is a way of composing, improvising, and performing that brings ART and musics together rather than segregating them. It is a way of making ART music which holds that all ART musics are created equal, coexisting in a beautiful brotherhoood/sisterhood…


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World Fusion ART is a way of composing, improvising, and performing that brings ART and musics together rather than segregating them. It is a way of making ART music which holds that all ART musics are created equal, coexisting in a beautiful brotherhoood/sisterhood of musics that complement and fructify each other. It is a global concept which allows the world's musics-written, improvised, handed-down, traditional, experimental-to come together, to learn, from one another, to reflect human diversity and pluralism. It is the music of rapprochement, of entente_not of competition and confrontation. And it is the logical outcome of the American melting pot: E pluribus unum. Gunther Schuller
You can hear world fusion music at our rad

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