1. AsWoodTurns.com

    Part of my childhood was spend on a fruit farm. We grew a lot of apples - mostly red ones.

    For this project, I decided to turn an apple. Too bad it is from maple wood. One tool that makes it easier is a screw chuck provided by Bert Desilse of Alberta, Canada. It is a metal piece that it held in place by standard chuck jaws. It contains a replaceable square drive screw that is held in place by a square drive bit. A very nice design.

    For color, I used alcohol based red, green, and yellow dyes applied with cue tips and a Richeson atomizer. I sanded back much of the dye to blend it together and allow a mottled final color. When completed, I sprayed it with rattle can lacquer.

    Enjoy!

    Blog: AsWoodTurns.com
    FB: Facebook.com/AsWoodTurns
    Music: Traumerei by Shumann performed by Becky Schlappi. Used with permission.

    # vimeo.com/276325241 Uploaded 5 Plays 0 Comments
  2. AsWoodTurns.com

    This project is inspired by a wall display at a hotel. The display looked like a field of flowers. My thought upon seeing the display - What can I do that is similar?

    Here it is, a maple bowl with a wavy rim that makes a strong resemblance to a flower.

    The major change is to leave a very thick rim that I could carve into a random wave.

    My maple bowl is about seven inches diameter and about two inches thick.

    Enjoy!

    Blog: AsWoodTurns.com
    FB: Facebook.com/AsWoodTurns
    Music: Traumerei by Shumann performed by Becky Schlappi. Used with permission.

    # vimeo.com/274618738 Uploaded 8 Plays 0 Comments
  3. AsWoodTurns.com

    This project video is a second pencil cup to answer this month's club challenge. After I turned the first one, I felt a pencil cup would be perfect for a Celtic knot.

    The process I follow does not restrict my knots to four loops. The process enables as many loops as could be desired. Eight loops is as easy as four except for the additional cutting and gluing.

    After turning my wood down to a uniform cylinder, I measured the diameter. At my computer I drew a circle of the same diameter. Since I had decided on three loops, I drew a triangle to enclose the circle. I printed the diagram, glued it to scrap hardboard. After cutting out the triangles, I screwed them to the ends of my cylinder and applied a little hot melt glue to stop spinning.

    After outlining my cylinder with triangles on my table saw sled, I hot melt glued blocks so that I could place it again with each turn.

    After that the process gets repetitive. For each kerf, I hot melt glued a reinforcing board to the top of the cylinder in case the cut goes completely through the cylinder or enough to allow the cylinder to flex. Then make the cut, and glue in the accent strip. I used 5 minute epoxy for gap filling and setting time properties. With the glue hard, I cut away the excess accent wood and the reinforcing board.

    With the knot complete, the rest is normal turning adding a top and a base.

    Enjoy!

    Blog: AsWoodTurns.com
    FB: Facebook.com/AsWoodTurns
    Music: Traumerei by Shumann performed by Becky Schlappi. Used with permission.

    # vimeo.com/273819914 Uploaded 7 Plays 0 Comments
  4. AsWoodTurns.com

    This project video is a pencil cup to answer this month's club challenge. While I could grab a chunk of solid wood, I want to do a segmented work. This time a stave segmentation.

    My raw material is twelve pen blanks for the staves and some scrap walnut for a bottom and rim. My pencel cup is about five inches tall and almost three inches in diameter, finished with lacquer.

    Each stave is cut to a trapezoid shape with 75 degree angles on each side. 75 is the complement of 15 degrees. 15 times 2 because it is cut on both sides, 12 staves is a complete circle.

    I'm looking for a better stave cutting sled for my table saw. Please offer your suggestions. I used a Wixey digital angle finder to set my saw blade.

    Enjoy!

    Blog: AsWoodTurns.com
    FB: Facebook.com/AsWoodTurns
    Music: Traumerei by Shumann performed by Becky Schlappi. Used with permission.

    # vimeo.com/272755864 Uploaded 1 Play 0 Comments
  5. AsWoodTurns.com

    My last video started with turning a perfect sphere then moving on to make it more artsy. However, I received many questions about how to turn a sphere. So, in this video, I'm slowing down and graphically illustrating the sphere turning process.

    Three measures are critical:
    1. Diameter - as measured on the work piece.
    2. Octagon corners - 0.293 x the diameter
    3. Octagon sides - 0.414 x the diameter.

    Between the octagon method and simple cup center faceplates, anyone can easily master woodturning perfect spheres either as an end woodturning project or as a component to a more complex project.

    After viewing this video go back one week to the previous video.

    Enjoy!

    Blog: AsWoodTurns.com
    FB: Facebook.com/AsWoodTurns

    # vimeo.com/271936307 Uploaded 17 Plays 0 Comments

As Wood Turns

Alan Stratton Plus

For me, Woodturning is a creative outlet, a great diversion from everyday work. I love to see beauty emerge from a piece of wood. I want to share this experience with others. Don't wait until you're perfect to begin

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