1. Urban Abstract was created by Jopsu Ramu and Timo Ramu (ex. Huhtala) - creative team and founders of Musuta Ltd. Jopsu Ramu is a young female designer and Creative Director of Musuta Ltd. Timo Ramu is her creative partner and manager of Musuta Ltd.

    This digital art piece was commissioned by TV Nelonen / channel 4 Finland and it was shown as the November break bumpers on one of the biggest commercial TV channels in Finland: TV Nelonen.

    Urban Abstract has been highly awarded, it has won bronze / in book award in D&Ad awards in London, Bronze in European Design awards in Rotterdam and most recently it won a Gold Lion from design category in Cannes Lions.

    Urban Abstract -piece was born in Tokyo during 2009. It consists of 40 X five second clips or it can be viewed as a one 200 second journey.

    The website urban-abstract.com works as a part of the piece and creates an extra dimension for the clips shown on TV.

    URBAN ABSTRACT - About the concept:

    Urban Abstract is a journey across urban space that unfolds in forty, 5 second parts. The journey, in one, two and three dimensions, is a bit like abstract surfing in which the original destination is only reached after a number of seemingly random yet linked detours occur. Points , lines, planes and other abstract elements create a journey through an Urban Abstract.
    The space between things is as important as intended space, perhaps creating a fourth dimension. Meaningful shapes and purposes occur in this dimension's reality as well. The concept of negative space has meaning here.
    Nature plays a part as well. To be able to understand and differentiate what is urban one has understand what is nature.
    The style of the shorts is fluid and, though seemingly random, stream into a cohesive whole. Perhaps watching them in a different order would be more like seeing the same journey from another point of view. The sound world is also very important -- movement in space is sensed even if watching the shorts with eyes closed. Sounds overlap, fade, come and go.
    Architectural, abstract, someway minimalist and abstract with a touch of humanity.
    This feeling is reached through mixing techniques such as vectors , hand drawn lines and painting.
    Urban Abstract was realized in Tokyo by a team of artists, designers and animators from Finland and Japan. Urban Abstract was created by Jopsu Ramu from Musuta Ltd, a concept, art & design -studio based in Tokyo and Helsinki.

    About the creators:

    Jopsu Ramu (born 1982). She is a young Finnish designer and an art director who runs her own business Musuta Ltd. Ramu creates art, graphic design, space & design.

    Timo Ramu (ex. Huhtala) manager and creative partner of Musuta Ltd.

    Musuta Ltd.
    Musuta Ltd. is a Finnish creative studio operating in and between Helsinki & Tokyo. Musuta is a multidisciplinary design studio that makes art, space, design, graphics, concepts & branding.
    Musuta produces Ramu's personal art work as well as creates commercial work for different clients including: Iittala, Hartwall, Pepsi Co., Kawada Group, TV Nelonen etc.
    - musuta.com

    TV Nelonen
    Channel Four Finland – Nelonen Nationwide commercial tv-channel Offers second-highest reach and is the third-largest advertising medium in Finland
    nelonen.fi

    If you embed or publish the Urban Abstract -video on blogs etc. please keep in mind to mention and credit the creators. The video should not be altered or edited in any way without permission from the creators.

    Credits:
    Creative Director Jopsu Ramu MUSUTA
    Art Director Jopsu Ramu MUSUTA
    Design&Storyboard Jopsu Ramu MUSUTA
    Opening scene artwork Shun Kawakami artless Inc.
    Calligraphy Gen Miyamura
    Sound Chikao Maruyama
    Producer Timo Ramu (ex. Huhtala) MUSUTA
    Animation&Production: Mitsutomo Maeda & Masaru Ikeda EDP graphic works
    Project management Tokyo Masaji Kinoshita / shirofuchi Inc.
    Executive Producer MUSUTA Ltd.
    Special thanks Taisuke Koyama, Brian Kaszonyi
    Created by MUSUTA Ltd. - Jopsu Ramu & Timo Ramu (ex. Huhtala)

    # vimeo.com/7681282 Uploaded 367K Plays 87 Comments
  2. Still shocked and excited from last night, it's an honor for us to show you this absolutely MINDBLOWING TITLES made for OFFF by PostPanic.

    Thank you so much to PostPanic, and specially to Mischa Rozema, Ania Markham and Si Scott, simply epic!!!

    Written by Mischa Rozema and British graphic designer, Si Scott, the opening titles reflect their dark thoughts on a possible future. Directed by Mischa and shot on location in Prague, the film guides the viewer through a grim scenario embedded with the names of artists appearing at this year’s OFFF festival. The live action was brought back to Amsterdam for post, primarily carried out by PostPanic’s in-house team of artists but also with the additional help of freelancers and partner companies that we have enjoyed strong creative relationships with over the years. It’s really fair to say that this was a labour of love by a passionate crew of people.

    Says Ania Markham, Executive Producer at PostPanic:
    “The images created by the crew of people working on the titles has been unbelievable, with nationalities represented including Dutch, Czech, English, American, Polish, German, Swedish and Belgian. It’s been a great opportunity for all of us to work together on a non-commercial project we’re passionate about and we’re so proud of the combined effort and final result.”

    DIRECTORS NOTES (Mischa Rozema)

    This project started out as a collaboration between myself and Si Scott. Right from the start, we decided that it should be the darkest thing we could make. I think it just felt natural to the both of us; if we had to nail the future, it would not be a nice place.

    This idea evolved into a clash of times. Inspired by an idea from the late Arthur C. Clarke. He wrote about different historical civilizations meeting in a single point in time. So what happens when civilizations meet? The 'weaker' one gets eaten by the 'stronger'. You only have to look at history to see the destructive power of civilizations.

    So the main underlying idea is: what would happen if the future lands on our doorstep today? Let's take mankind, add perhaps 100 years and then let them show up on our doorstep today. The future would pretty much devour the present. Probably in a matter of, let's say, 7 days… So that's what we're looking at. But every ending also means a new beginning, hence Year Zero.

    There's all kinds of hidden messages in there. Like the virus eating away at reality, buildings and people, even at the viewers brain. It's behaving off course much like a computer virus. And the network of wires represents the future of social networking. I just made it physical and let it 'catch' the city and it's people like a net. All these ideas just serve as inspiration for us to create a future that worked for this concept. They're not meant to be deciphered by the audience. It's still meant to be just a title sequence and not an actual movie.

    Now what makes a good title sequence? Personally, I think it's something that gets you in the mood, warms you up for what you're about to experience, be it a film, tv series or in our case, the OFFF festival. We decided to treat the OFFF festival as a feature film experience. So all we had to do was get the viewer into the right state of mind. Without, of course, being too narrative led. The best title sequences out there are nothing but a random collection of images/scenes that don't tell a lot if you watch them on their own. But edit them together and a new context is created. A context that matters, a feeling that gets the viewer ready for the main event, in our case, the festival.

    To get started, the next thing we did was make a collection of ideas that would scare me and Si. So, anything drawn from our youth, right through to stuff that's inspired us over the years as well as seemingly random compositions that trigger the imagination of the viewer. For example, when we show you the aesthetics of a car explosion, it's carefully constructed. Why a car and not something else? Because an exploding car brings extra content to an otherwise simple aesthetic display of violence. A car doesn't explode by itself so instantly the brain tries to formulate the background behind it. It adds an either political or criminal edge to the violence. To me it felt appropriate because of the sense of protest and rebellion the shot has. And maybe the biggest question; was there someone in the car and if so, who was it? For me, every idea should provoke these kind of questions; from a girl in a prom dress holding a rocket launcher to a riot cop standing in the kitchen. All scenes have a pre and post story to them. In no time you're actually trying to connect these seemingly random scenes and boom; you've just created your own strange context. You now have a feeling, a taste and lots of questions probably. Questions that normally would be answered by watching the actual movie. But since there's no actual movie here we'll leave stranded with, hopefully, an uncomfortable feeling and lots of questions - some might feel unsatisfied and wondering why. Just like a nightmare.

    We also wanted the actual titles to be different this time. Most of the time festival titles are driven by the idea on how to show titles. A mechanism that displays titles in a creative way. We actually thought to bring the festival theme to the foreground and have the titles play a part in it. Incorporate them so they become the actual fiber/texture of the piece itself. Practically I still think it's nice that the viewer has to actively look for the names and not get too comfortable. Even if it means to see it a couple of times which surely is the best we can aim for as a free project ; )

    How about the shoot? Well, prior to Prague we created more than 50 ideas I could play with. This was always the intention. Go out shooting with a tiny crew, acting like we're still in art school and be open for anything that might happen. That's why we shot everything on 2 Canon 5D's (that and having no budget off course). This was a really nice change for me. Normally I prepare commercial shoots to the very last detail and there's a lot more people involved. Savage helped us out big time in Prague. We also had some bad news. Due to his back problems Si Scott had to abandon the project and couldn't join the shoot.

    When we came back from Prague I started editing straight away and soon came to the conclusion we had about 60 vfx shots to work on and no budget and increasingly less time. Remember that this project was a side dish for PostPanic, we had to work on commissioned jobs also. But everybody involved soon fell in love with the project, including STORM Postproduction who are our neighbors (luckily for us).

    In the mean time we received the title list. It had about 70 names on it! That's when I found out that the dynamics I wanted to use would probably not work. Just too many names that would make the piece too long to just show random images. So in the plane towards Prague I thought of bringing in a tiny bit of narrative. Which turned out to be the beginning of the sequence (1st act). I wrote in a lead character that would relate to the viewer.

    The idea was to trick the audience into thinking they're watching some kind of documentary. We basically follow a guy going home. Bit by bit his environment gets stranger and more uncomfortable to watch. Is he living in a war zone? Slowly the background takes over and the piece changes into an urban nightmare. And like a nightmare, the story/edit doesn't always make sense but makes you feel really uncomfortable. I also wanted the viewer to experience the nightmare. That's where the dark matter comes in. Dark matter is what I call the macro shot bits. Flashes that derail your train of thought like there's something eating away at your brain as you try to make sense of the nightmare. I wanted the viewer to go nuts, alongside with the cast. Erase the line between nightmare and reality. The end result is something you won't come across easily on your tv. And is also just another fun way to do titles.

    The sound design and music made by Hecq added a lot to the feel and scale of the film. It clearly divides the 3 acts (1st act: up to execution, 2nd from execution, 3rd final shot) and makes completely different ideas and scenes feel coherent. It also emphasizes the dynamics of the film and brings the much needed pace at the end. It's been great working with Ben. We've been surfing the same wave length throughout the project.

    Finally I want to thank everyone involved for making these titles possible. For creating something out of nothing. For showing so much love for something as dark as this.

    CREDITS

    Directed by Mischa Rozema
    Story by Mischa Rozema & Si Scott
    Production Company: PostPanic
    Executive Producers: Jules Tervoort, Ania Markham
    DoP: Jiri Malek, Mischa Rozema
    Music & Sound Design: Hecq
    Senior Producer: Annejes van Liempd
    Production Assistant: Jacinta Ramaker
    Production Designer: Roland Mylanus
    Editor: Mischa Rozema

    Prague Cast:
    Main Hero: Vladan Bláha
    Grafitti Guy: Tom Malar
    Main Hero Sister: Katerina Galova

    Post-Production: PostPanic
    CG Supervisor: Ivor Goldberg
    VFX Supervisor: Chris Staves
    3D Artists: Jeroen Aerts, Matthijs Joor, Jurriën Boogert, Marnix Reckman, Adam Janeczek
    2D Artist: Erwin van den IJssel
    3D Interns: Cara To, Xander Clerckx
    2D Interns: Mathijs Luijten, Per Westholm
    Compositing: Chris Staves, Ivor Goldberg, Adam Janeczek, Matthijs Joor
    Graphic Designs: Si Scott
    Additional Graffiti Elements: Florian Stumpe
    Matte Painting: Wieger Poutsma
    Additional 3D and Compositing: Storm PostProduction

    Production (Prague) by Savage:
    Executive Producer: Klara Kralickova, Pavla Burgetova Callegari
    Producer: Michaela Berkova
    Production Assistant: Vojta Ruzicka
    Prop master: Jan Fiala
    Location Scout & Management: Petr Bastar, Adam Fuchs
    Location: CREVISTON, a.s.
    Tattoos made by: Wowa tattoo prague

    # vimeo.com/24982650 Uploaded
  3. vjsuave.com

    Making of: vimeo.com/33231516

    ygormarotta.com
    podoboo.com.ar
    facebook.com/vjsuave

    Director: vjsuave
    Art Direction: vjsuave
    Character Design: Dante Zaballa, vjsuave
    Character Animation: Dante Zaballa
    Animation: vjsuave
    Music: Juan Tortarolo
    Edition: Guillermo Coube, vjsuave
    Camera: Rafael Garcia
    Camera assistant: Joao Maia
    Mapping: vjsuave
    Locations: Rafael Garcia, vjsuave
    Producer: Juliana Borges
    Camera car: Neto Valesi

    Supported by MTV

    # vimeo.com/33471526 Uploaded 151K Plays 72 Comments
  4. sweatshoppe.org
    brunolevy.com
    blakeshaw.net

    New media art duo SWEATSHOPPE aka Blake Shaw and Bruno Levy are back from Europe with a new video that showcases their live interactive video wheatpaste in Berlin, Bristol, Belgrade, London and Paris. Over a two week period the duo pasted their videos in over 10 spots including the Berlin Wall, Les Invalides, Cordy House and even constructed a 5 meter telescopic electronic paint roller to create a two-story tall video painting in Bristol.

    Video painting is a technology the duo developed that allows them to create the illusion that they are painting videos onto walls with electronic paint rollers they built. It works through custom software that they wrote that tracks the position of the paint rollers and projects video wherever they choose to paint, allowing them to explore the relationship between video, mark making and architecture and create live video collages in real time.

    Music: Artist Eskmo "Cloudlight" from the album Eskmo Ninja Tune (2010)
    Copyright 2010
    buy track: itunes.apple.com/ca/album/cloudlight/id416299279?i=41629928

    # vimeo.com/39765217 Uploaded 258K Plays 82 Comments
  5. Filmed and cut by Charles le Brigand
    All shots are video, no stills.

    Under Manhattan’s Upper West side, runs the “Freedom” Tunnel. Built in the 30’s by Robert Moses, the passage boasts legendary graffiti murals and piles of debris remaining of the past homeless city era. After using it for only a couple of years, Amtrak discontinued the line and left a massive cavern which later became a shelter for street people. Progressively, the tunnel turned into a veritable underground metropolis where thousands of homeless were living in organized communities underneath the city’s skin.

    The tunnel also became a prime spot for graffiti artists. Chris Pape, aka Freedom, was one of the pioneers and his work inspired the name of the tunnel. “Freedom” painted immense murals utilizing the unique lighting provided by the ventilation ducts, turning the tunnel into an extraordinary underground art gallery. Some of his most notable paintings survived for decades and are still conspicuous today (“Venus de Milo”, the “Coca-Cola Mural”, Dali’s “Melting Clock”,a self-portrait featuring a male torso with a spray-can head, etc.).

    In 1991, Amtrak decided to reopen the tunnel. The shanty towns were cleared out by the police and homeless were evicted. Although deserted, the tunnel is now an active train line and a stunning experience for urban explorers.

    It is a bizarre blend of dark and light, silence and rumble, solitude and multitude. As you penetrate the tunnel and walk along the tracks, the sunbeams perforating the ceiling and highlighting the railway gives the place a post-nuclear feel. Voices from children playing above in Riverside Park sound like lost souls and trains whistling and roaring through the ruins of the shanty towns send chills down your spine.

    This is one of the most uncommon and fascinating journeys I’ve ever taken.

    Video and words by Charles le Brigand
    For information please visit http://charleslebrigand.com/ or http://ldbk.eu/carlito
    or email me here: charleslebrigand@gmail.com
    All rights reserved. Une production de Brigand © 2010

    Music: "Ascendance" by Zenzile
    zenzile.com

    More Images here:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephanemissier/sets/72157624396820178/

    # vimeo.com/13039385 Uploaded 46.1K Plays 19 Comments

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Randy Levy

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