1. Every frame in this video is a photograph taken by astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS).
    I created this timelapse on a long weekend after discovering the image library online. I used Photoshop and Sony Vegas to edit and compile the footage.
    The music is a track from one of my favorite sci-fi movies, Sunshine. I thought the music and imagery would fit well together.

    *** Thank you all for likes,comments, shares and support this video has received. I'm truly glad so many have enjoyed it.***

    You can view my other work and see my other projects here:
    facebook.com/kn8photo
    knatephoto.com

    Music by John Murphy - Sunshine (Adagio In D Minor)
    Performed by the City Of Prague Philharmonic
    amazon.com/dp/B003YYX1YG/?tag=you09f-20

    Image Courtesy of the Image Science & Analysis Laboratory,
    NASA Johnson Space Center, The Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth
    eol.jsc.nasa.gov

    # vimeo.com/45878034 Uploaded 4.8M Plays 534 Comments
  2. Please note: ISS Tronized is now part of a spectacular ISS Documentary: "ISS Image Frontier - making the invisible visible" - with Dr. Don Pettit / NASA Astronaut! vimeo.com/61083440!
    --- Do you remember 1982's "TRON" movie? The plot: A computer programmer (epic: Jeff Bridges) is digitized inside the software world of a mainframe computer, where he interacts with various programs in his attempt to get back out. I loved the light cycle races and strange solar wind ships...

    Back in the real word the ISS is in a way one of these solar ships, constantly rotating around us. A tiny white spot, as it can be seen racing over the sky from time to time, when illuminated by the sunset (and sunrise ;).

    This Video was achived by "stacking" image sequences provided by NASA from the Crew at International Space Station (see also fragileoasis.org/blog/2012/3/on-the-trails-of-stars/). These "stacks" create the Star Trails, but furthermore make interesting patterns visible. For example lightning corridors within clouds, but they also show occasional satellite tracks (or Iridium Flashes) as well as meteors - patterns that interrupt the main Star Trails, and thus are immediately visible.

    The many oversaturated hot pixels in some of the scenes are the inevitable result of ultrahigh ISO settings the Nikon D3s in ISS-use are pushed to for keeping exposure times short by all means (owed to the dramatic speed the ISS travels). As there are no dark frames or RAW data currently available, hot pixels are not easy to remove.

    After the initial stacking, all images have been sequenced with Apple Motion and the Video cut and edited with Final Cut Pro X. Stacking done with StarStaX, get it here: markus-enzweiler.de/software/software.html

    This Video would also not have been possible without that great minimal soundtrack "Eileen" by Lee Rosevere (members.shaw.ca/happypuppyrecords/index.html) that totally nailed the mood, as well as a short clip of "Window #3" by Two Bicycles (freemusicarchive.org/music/Two_Bicycles/Beko_Crash_Symbols_1/07_Window_3). VIMEO MUSIC STORE ROCKS!

    All sequences and images courtesy "The Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth", Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center, eol.jsc.nasa.gov/Videos/CrewEarthObservationsVideos/
    Closing sequence © Christoph Malin / ESO.org / filmed at Cerro Paranal.

    Thanks a lot to my favourite bad Astronomer, Phil Plait at BadAstronomy for first posting the film (blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2012/10/16/my-god-its-full-of-star-trails/) and many many thanks to Vimeo for the Staff Pick!

    A truckload of thanks go out to NASA astronaut Don Pettit (petapixel.com/2012/06/25/astronaut-don-pettit-floating-with-his-huge-camera-collection-on-the-iss/) and his colleagues for taking these images, and making films like this one reality!

    Finally, please also be aware of the growing issue of light pollution (plightwithlight.org/index.php?id=49&L=1) one can see in many of these scenes! Support IDA (darksky.org) on their challenge to preserve the night sky for us and our children, on reducing energy waste! And don't forget, it is your tax money that lights up the sky!

    Oh, and visit my friends at the UNESCO Project TWAN (twanight.org) for some of the coolest nightsky images and videos on our planet! One people, one sky!

    Always believe in your dreams and make it possible!

    All the best,
    Christoph Malin
    christophmalin.com

    PS: At about 1:42 you see Comet "Lovejoy" rising...

    PS2: Be sure to check out my other Movies:

    "Astronomer's Paradise", vimeo.com/36972668 - featured on National Geographic
    "The Island - Teaser", vimeo.com/27539860 - featured on NG
    "Urban Mountain Sky", vimeo.com/40969904 - featured on Discovery Channel
    "Black Hole Sun", vimeo.com/24149087, featured on NG

    facebook.com/christoph.malin
    twitter.com/#!/christophmalin
    twanight.org/cmalin

    # vimeo.com/51499009 Uploaded
  3. This film follows the ancient cycle of sunset, to night, to sunrise. A continuous loop of perpetual movement that has been unbroken since the dawn of time, and the only true constant in our lives.

    I shot this film over 12 days around the San Pedro de Atacama region of Northern Chile. San Pedro is an oasis town in the Atacama and sits at an altitude of 2600m. The town is a great base to explore the fascinating landscapes that surround it, and everything just goes up and up.

    The Atacama is well-known for what are arguably the cleanest, darkest skies on Earth. The dry air adds an extra transparency and this coupled with the altitude creates a night sky like no other. I visited at a time when Venus was situated quite close to the centre of the Milky Way; an astronomical event that only takes place every 8 years or so. I also timed my visit with the Autumn equinox which is a good time of year to capture Zodiacal light; the celestial phenomenon caused by sunlight scattering interplanetary space dust in the Zodiacal cloud. It stretches across the ecliptic and glows for a short while after sunset like a UFO beam and I was lucky enough to witness this every night I stepped out into the dark.

    In my opinion an adventure is not complete unless there are challenges, and this trip was no different. My luggage was lost for the first 6 days I was there so for half of my trip I had no tripods and no motion control equipment. I shot many time-lapses in this film with my cameras on buckets weighted down with rocks! it was far from ideal but I was determined not to miss an opportunity to capture this wonderful sky. I battled through with little food and less sleep, language barriers and I even broke down in the middle of nowhere at one point, but at least the sunset was nice that evening! I found the Atacama to be a very harsh landscape; the dry air makes your skin crack and split, the winds pummel you with every gust and the altitude slows you down and affects your ability to hike with heavy equipment. By the end of this trip me, my kit and my car had taken a real battering but it was all worth it, I wouldn't have had it any other way.

    Music composed by Shudan, please support this amazing artist by clicking here:
    http://facebook.com/shudanmusic

    All footage is available in resolutions up to 4k. If you would like to licence any of my clips or talk about a project you have in mind please contact me at:
    contact@nicholasbuer.com

    You can connect/follow me on all the usual social media sites:
    http://facebook.com/nicholasbuerphotography
    http://twitter.com/nicholasbuer
    http://gplus.to/nicholasbuer
    http://flickr.com/nicholasbuer
    http://instagram.com/nicholasbuer

    To see more work please visit http://www.nicholasbuer.com

    For motion control I used the Stage One Dolly System by Dynamic Perception:
    http://www.dynamicperception.com

    © Nicholas Buer 2014

    # vimeo.com/83436955 Uploaded 922K Plays 144 Comments
  4. Over 100,000 asteroids and their colors, as seen by a single remarkable survey telescope.

    This animation shows the orbital motions of over 100,000 of the asteroids observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), with colors illustrating the compositional diversity measured by the SDSS five-color camera. The relative sizes of each asteroid are also illustrated.

    All main-belt asteroids and Trojan asteroids with orbits known to high precision are shown. The animation is rendered with a timestep of 3 days.

    The compositional gradient of the asteroid belt is clearly visible, with green Vesta-family members in the inner belt fading through the blue C-class asteroids in the outer belt, and the deep red Trojan swarms beyond that.

    Occasional diagonal slashes that appear in the animation are the SDSS survey beams; these appear because the animation is rendered at near the survey epoch.

    The average orbital distances of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, and Jupiter are illustrated with rings.

    Colors represented with the same scheme as Parker et al. (2008):
    adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/bib_query?arXiv:0807.3762

    Concept and rendering by Alex H. Parker: alexharrisonparker.com/

    Funding for the creation and distribution of the SDSS Archive has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Participating Institutions, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Japanese Monbukagakusho, and the Max Planck Society. The SDSS Web site is sdss.org/.

    The SDSS is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) for the Participating Institutions. The Participating Institutions are The University of Chicago, Fermilab, the Institute for Advanced Study, the Japan Participation Group, The Johns Hopkins University, the Korean Scientist Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), the Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics (MPA), New Mexico State University, University of Pittsburgh, University of Portsmouth, Princeton University, the United States Naval Observatory, and the University of Washington.

    Music: Tamxr by LJ Kruzer (ljkruzer.co.uk/)

    # vimeo.com/87092212 Uploaded 96.5K Plays 9 Comments

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