1. Serving our country for 19 years has solidified my unwavering belief in selfless service. In addition, it has provided me insight between military and civilian cultural divides. I am continually reminded of our civic duty to care for those who have selflessly sacrificed for our country. Recently diagnosed with a recurrent medical condition, I have confronted the associated stigma of serving my nation within an altered capacity. I frequently traveled to Walter Reed Army Medical Hospital. During one of these visits, I witnessed a soldier struggling to adjust his camouflaged backpack. This individual battled silently, without assistance, but instead with stares as he exited the medical hospital. This young soldier was a dual amputee, facing a military discharge, and forced to re-learn life without legs. This soldier inspired me to launch The Frontlines website. 
    There is strength in numbers and together we can mitigate the long-term costs of providing medical and disability care for our veterans by inspiring selfless service, mentoring and community participation. In the military we can all remember that Non Commissioned Officer (NCO) or senior leader taking the personal time to mentor us and show us what “right looks like”. Through this combination of leadership and mentorship we are able to also grow, rise up the ranks, and have productive military careers. However, where is that leadership or mentorship when a man or woman on active duty transitions to veteran status? How do they answer the question of "What's Next?" as they transition to new productive lives? Too often the transition is disjointed because of a non- cohesive message, organizational self-interest, a region with which a veteran returns to, and an overall lack of mentorship. The Frontlines seeks to bridge the divide between military and civilian cultures through social networking and providing resources that help answer the "What's Next?" Filtering all of these resources through one network is why The Frontlines is so necessary. Without it how can we ever hope to provide a seamless transition from active duty to veteran status? There are plenty of stories of veteran success as entrepreneurs, civil servants, teachers etc., that have successfully transitioned to life as “civilians”. With over 300 million inspired citizens in the United States, we can support a seamless transition from the front lines to home life and help answer the question "What's Next?".
    Thank you for watching this video and reading my thoughts on how each of us can help show a clearer path for veterans on their road of answer their questions of "What's Next?"
    Very respectfully,
    Nathan W. Tierney

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  2. Why The Frontlines Was Created? I wanted to share my personal views of why it is so critical that we as veterans share our story of selfless service. With preservation and education we can inspire future generations to serve for a cause greater than oneself.

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  3. The Frontlines upgrades will allow us to filter the nearly 400, 000 URL resources for veterans and give them a personal "checklist" to assist them transition to civilian life. Imagine not only a network that tailors the resources to the veterans, but later an iPhone or iPad App that a veteran could use to navigate to the nearest veteran employment center, shelter, or VA hospital etc. Modern technology holds the key to addressing these issues. Please spread the word, share your story to promote selfless service in America. Thank you.

    Very respectfully,

    The Warrant

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  4. The battle for North Africa was a struggle for control of the Suez Canal and access to oil, the strategic commodity due to the increased mechanization of modern armies. Both the Axis Powers and the Allies were completely dependent on the Middle Eastern oil. On November 8, 1942, five days after Montgomery’s victory in Egypt, US forces stormed ashore in Morocco and Algeria as part of Operation Torch. American forces first encountered the Germans at the Battle of Kasserine Pass (February 19-25th) On February 14, 1943, the Germans launched a two-pronged offensive, and by February 18, Kasserine Pass was in Axis hands, and U.S. ground forces had suffered their first major defeat of the war. Rommel’s Afrika Korps routed Major General Lloyd Fredendall’s II Corps, in a humiliating defeat. After the defeat, Lieutenant General George S. Patton replaced Fredendall.

    Despite the victory at Kasserine, the German situation continued to worsen due to poor logistics and lack of manpower. On March 9, 1943 General Rommel departed Africa, citing health reasons, and turned over command to General Hans-Jürgen von Arnim. The combined British and American forces pressed the remaining German and Italian troops, and ensured they could not escape by sea. After the fall of Tunis, the Axis forces in North Africa surrendered on May 13, 1943, and 275,000 German and Italian soldiers were taken prisoner. Strategically, the North African campaign was critical for the Western Allies. The victory was the first decisive defeat of the Axis Powers. Tactically and operational levels, several factors conspired against the Axis despite Rommel’s leadership, and the superb fighting of the Afrika Korps. In the end, the Allies achieved victory by sheer mass and reliable logistics.

    This interview is with Mr. Francis Anderson, a World War II veteran, who successfully evaded capture from German and Italian forces during the battle for Kasserine Pass.
    To hear the full interview or see more amazing stories please visit The Frontlines http://www.thefrontlines.com. Thank you.

    Very respectfully,
    Nathan W. Tierney
    CW4, USA

    References

    WWII History in the Classroom

    Witness to War Foundation

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  5. Veteran of WWII-Mercy Killing. This interview explores the often not discussed topic of “mercy killings”. Are mercy killings justified in war,peacetime, or to end the pain of the terminally ill? What would you do if your friend was trapped in a burning plane, unable to escape, and pleading for help? Faced with such an experience, veteran of World War II Mitch Touart shares his war story.

    To learn more please visit The Frontlines website at http://www.thefrontlines.com. Fronts Change. Memories Don't.

    Very respectfully,
    CW3(P) Nathan Tierney

    (Interview with Mr. Mitch Touart courtesy of Witness to War Foundation)

    # vimeo.com/19330164 Uploaded 159 Plays 0 Comments

The Frontlines

Nathan Tierney

The Frontlines aims to combine all of the 40,000 organizations which support veterans into one network of veterans, active duty, military families and citizens together...there is strength in numbers. If you are a veteran who has transitioned, or a concerned…


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The Frontlines aims to combine all of the 40,000 organizations which support veterans into one network of veterans, active duty, military families and citizens together...there is strength in numbers. If you are a veteran who has transitioned, or a concerned citizen you have a story, skills and insight that can help mentor other veterans on a path toward opening a small business, employment a particular company, and a multitude of other useful knowledge. Start sharing that information and resources. Join The Frontlines now http://www.thefrontlines.com.

Thank you for watching The Frontlines videos and reading my thoughts on how each of us can help show a clearer path for veterans on their road of answer their questions of "What's Next?"
Very respectfully,
Nathan W. Tierney
CW4, USA

http://www.thefrontlines.com

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