1. Definitely, a dream come true! Here you have the OFFF 2009 Main Titles from Prologue (by Kyle Cooper, Ilya Abulhanov and Elizabeth Newman). By far, the best one's ever!!!

    # vimeo.com/4673875 Uploaded
  2. Still shocked and excited from last night, it's an honor for us to show you this absolutely MINDBLOWING TITLES made for OFFF by PostPanic.

    Thank you so much to PostPanic, and specially to Mischa Rozema, Ania Markham and Si Scott, simply epic!!!

    Written by Mischa Rozema and British graphic designer, Si Scott, the opening titles reflect their dark thoughts on a possible future. Directed by Mischa and shot on location in Prague, the film guides the viewer through a grim scenario embedded with the names of artists appearing at this year’s OFFF festival. The live action was brought back to Amsterdam for post, primarily carried out by PostPanic’s in-house team of artists but also with the additional help of freelancers and partner companies that we have enjoyed strong creative relationships with over the years. It’s really fair to say that this was a labour of love by a passionate crew of people.

    Says Ania Markham, Executive Producer at PostPanic:
    “The images created by the crew of people working on the titles has been unbelievable, with nationalities represented including Dutch, Czech, English, American, Polish, German, Swedish and Belgian. It’s been a great opportunity for all of us to work together on a non-commercial project we’re passionate about and we’re so proud of the combined effort and final result.”

    DIRECTORS NOTES (Mischa Rozema)

    This project started out as a collaboration between myself and Si Scott. Right from the start, we decided that it should be the darkest thing we could make. I think it just felt natural to the both of us; if we had to nail the future, it would not be a nice place.

    This idea evolved into a clash of times. Inspired by an idea from the late Arthur C. Clarke. He wrote about different historical civilizations meeting in a single point in time. So what happens when civilizations meet? The 'weaker' one gets eaten by the 'stronger'. You only have to look at history to see the destructive power of civilizations.

    So the main underlying idea is: what would happen if the future lands on our doorstep today? Let's take mankind, add perhaps 100 years and then let them show up on our doorstep today. The future would pretty much devour the present. Probably in a matter of, let's say, 7 days… So that's what we're looking at. But every ending also means a new beginning, hence Year Zero.

    There's all kinds of hidden messages in there. Like the virus eating away at reality, buildings and people, even at the viewers brain. It's behaving off course much like a computer virus. And the network of wires represents the future of social networking. I just made it physical and let it 'catch' the city and it's people like a net. All these ideas just serve as inspiration for us to create a future that worked for this concept. They're not meant to be deciphered by the audience. It's still meant to be just a title sequence and not an actual movie.

    Now what makes a good title sequence? Personally, I think it's something that gets you in the mood, warms you up for what you're about to experience, be it a film, tv series or in our case, the OFFF festival. We decided to treat the OFFF festival as a feature film experience. So all we had to do was get the viewer into the right state of mind. Without, of course, being too narrative led. The best title sequences out there are nothing but a random collection of images/scenes that don't tell a lot if you watch them on their own. But edit them together and a new context is created. A context that matters, a feeling that gets the viewer ready for the main event, in our case, the festival.

    To get started, the next thing we did was make a collection of ideas that would scare me and Si. So, anything drawn from our youth, right through to stuff that's inspired us over the years as well as seemingly random compositions that trigger the imagination of the viewer. For example, when we show you the aesthetics of a car explosion, it's carefully constructed. Why a car and not something else? Because an exploding car brings extra content to an otherwise simple aesthetic display of violence. A car doesn't explode by itself so instantly the brain tries to formulate the background behind it. It adds an either political or criminal edge to the violence. To me it felt appropriate because of the sense of protest and rebellion the shot has. And maybe the biggest question; was there someone in the car and if so, who was it? For me, every idea should provoke these kind of questions; from a girl in a prom dress holding a rocket launcher to a riot cop standing in the kitchen. All scenes have a pre and post story to them. In no time you're actually trying to connect these seemingly random scenes and boom; you've just created your own strange context. You now have a feeling, a taste and lots of questions probably. Questions that normally would be answered by watching the actual movie. But since there's no actual movie here we'll leave stranded with, hopefully, an uncomfortable feeling and lots of questions - some might feel unsatisfied and wondering why. Just like a nightmare.

    We also wanted the actual titles to be different this time. Most of the time festival titles are driven by the idea on how to show titles. A mechanism that displays titles in a creative way. We actually thought to bring the festival theme to the foreground and have the titles play a part in it. Incorporate them so they become the actual fiber/texture of the piece itself. Practically I still think it's nice that the viewer has to actively look for the names and not get too comfortable. Even if it means to see it a couple of times which surely is the best we can aim for as a free project ; )

    How about the shoot? Well, prior to Prague we created more than 50 ideas I could play with. This was always the intention. Go out shooting with a tiny crew, acting like we're still in art school and be open for anything that might happen. That's why we shot everything on 2 Canon 5D's (that and having no budget off course). This was a really nice change for me. Normally I prepare commercial shoots to the very last detail and there's a lot more people involved. Savage helped us out big time in Prague. We also had some bad news. Due to his back problems Si Scott had to abandon the project and couldn't join the shoot.

    When we came back from Prague I started editing straight away and soon came to the conclusion we had about 60 vfx shots to work on and no budget and increasingly less time. Remember that this project was a side dish for PostPanic, we had to work on commissioned jobs also. But everybody involved soon fell in love with the project, including STORM Postproduction who are our neighbors (luckily for us).

    In the mean time we received the title list. It had about 70 names on it! That's when I found out that the dynamics I wanted to use would probably not work. Just too many names that would make the piece too long to just show random images. So in the plane towards Prague I thought of bringing in a tiny bit of narrative. Which turned out to be the beginning of the sequence (1st act). I wrote in a lead character that would relate to the viewer.

    The idea was to trick the audience into thinking they're watching some kind of documentary. We basically follow a guy going home. Bit by bit his environment gets stranger and more uncomfortable to watch. Is he living in a war zone? Slowly the background takes over and the piece changes into an urban nightmare. And like a nightmare, the story/edit doesn't always make sense but makes you feel really uncomfortable. I also wanted the viewer to experience the nightmare. That's where the dark matter comes in. Dark matter is what I call the macro shot bits. Flashes that derail your train of thought like there's something eating away at your brain as you try to make sense of the nightmare. I wanted the viewer to go nuts, alongside with the cast. Erase the line between nightmare and reality. The end result is something you won't come across easily on your tv. And is also just another fun way to do titles.

    The sound design and music made by Hecq added a lot to the feel and scale of the film. It clearly divides the 3 acts (1st act: up to execution, 2nd from execution, 3rd final shot) and makes completely different ideas and scenes feel coherent. It also emphasizes the dynamics of the film and brings the much needed pace at the end. It's been great working with Ben. We've been surfing the same wave length throughout the project.

    Finally I want to thank everyone involved for making these titles possible. For creating something out of nothing. For showing so much love for something as dark as this.

    CREDITS

    Directed by Mischa Rozema
    Story by Mischa Rozema & Si Scott
    Production Company: PostPanic
    Executive Producers: Jules Tervoort, Ania Markham
    DoP: Jiri Malek, Mischa Rozema
    Music & Sound Design: Hecq
    Senior Producer: Annejes van Liempd
    Production Assistant: Jacinta Ramaker
    Production Designer: Roland Mylanus
    Editor: Mischa Rozema

    Prague Cast:
    Main Hero: Vladan Bláha
    Grafitti Guy: Tom Malar
    Main Hero Sister: Katerina Galova

    Post-Production: PostPanic
    CG Supervisor: Ivor Goldberg
    VFX Supervisor: Chris Staves
    3D Artists: Jeroen Aerts, Matthijs Joor, Jurriën Boogert, Marnix Reckman, Adam Janeczek
    2D Artist: Erwin van den IJssel
    3D Interns: Cara To, Xander Clerckx
    2D Interns: Mathijs Luijten, Per Westholm
    Compositing: Chris Staves, Ivor Goldberg, Adam Janeczek, Matthijs Joor
    Graphic Designs: Si Scott
    Additional Graffiti Elements: Florian Stumpe
    Matte Painting: Wieger Poutsma
    Additional 3D and Compositing: Storm PostProduction

    Production (Prague) by Savage:
    Executive Producer: Klara Kralickova, Pavla Burgetova Callegari
    Producer: Michaela Berkova
    Production Assistant: Vojta Ruzicka
    Prop master: Jan Fiala
    Location Scout & Management: Petr Bastar, Adam Fuchs
    Location: CREVISTON, a.s.
    Tattoos made by: Wowa tattoo prague

    # vimeo.com/24982650 Uploaded
  3. After a long long wait, here you have finally the amazing Titles for OFFF Paris 2010 by The Mill.

    Hope you love them as much as we do.

    Full credits:

    The Mill NY

    Jeff Stevens - Design Director
    Kim Dulaney - Designer
    Rob Petrie - CG Lead
    Boo Wong - Senior Producer
    Moss Levenson – Editor
    Fall on Your Sword – Music
    Henryboy – Sound Design
    Weston Fonger – Sound Mix

    3D
    Tom Bardwell
    Ian Brauner
    Jeffrey Dates
    Tony Jung
    Christopher Kujawa
    Michael Panov
    Joshua Merck
    Ruben Vanderbroek
    James Williams
    Stanislav Ilin

    2D
    Emmett Dzieza
    Marco Giampolo
    Melissa Graff
    Bashir Hamid
    Lu Lin
    Gigi Ng
    Doug Purver
    Jeff Robins
    Gap Yossanun
    Tim Haldeen
    Brian Sensebe

    # vimeo.com/12887998 Uploaded
  4. The mighty Joseph Kosinski invited Munkowitz to the GFX party once again, this time for his spring blockbuster feature film OBLIVION™… Predictably, the list of graphic assets to be created was obscene, so munko assembled and led another super team of GFX mercenaries and descended into the lovely confines of Crater Lake Productions to generate the aforementioned fuckload of graphic content… Working with Joseph always brings out the best in Munk and Company, and this time around was certainly no exception… OBLIVION © Universal Pictures, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

    A more thorough GFX Breakdown at: work.gmunk.com/OBLIVION-GFX

    GFX METHODOLOGY

    The briefing for the Graphic Language stressed functionality and minimalism while utilizing a bright, unified color palette that would appear equally well on both a dark or bright backdrop… The function was to reflect the modernized sensibilities of the TET Mainframe computer and would assist the characters with the key components of their duties on earth; be it the monitoring of all Vitals on the ground using Vika's Light Table, or the various diagnostics in the air using the Jack's Bubbleship… For good measure, the team also designed and animated all of the HUD UI for the various machines and weaponry in the film cuz they could, establishing a consistent graphic language that rendered all the interfaces with a loverly cohesion rarely seen in them massive-budget Sci-Fi productions...

    OBLIVION LIGHT TABLE UI

    One of the most widely seen Graphic elements was Vika's Light Table, which allowed her to guide Jack Harper through his tasks as a Drone repair man in the field of duty… The table itself was built practically, so most of the visuals were captured in-camera, lending a beautiful optical touch to the design ( thx Joe & Claudio )… The table consisted of four screens: A main map that Vika used to monitor the Bubbleship, Drone, and Scav positioning, a Drone Monitor which tracked all their key vitals and fuel status, A Hydro Rig monitor that displayed the collection progress for the large resource gatherers over the ocean, and finally a Weather Screen which showed the Tet's online status and also key vitals of the ever-changing weather systems… A couple extra tasks had the team designing another Map Diagnostic screen on a milky-white breakfast table top and a few key standalone windows that were analyzing Rogue Signal feeds that were key story points in the film...

    OBLIVION BUBBLESHIP UI

    Jack's helicopter, a remarkable Daniel Simon creation called the Bubbleship, was Jack's paramount vehicle in the film… The UI appeared as a hologram embedded within the spherical glass cockpit, done to perfection by the lovely folks at Pixomondo, and functioned to assist Jack in his flight and combat duties throughout the film… The team researched a grip of Flight simulator and Helicopter Combat interfaces and sought to modernize the aesthetic while still delivering key functionality that would mimic real-world flight tools... And of course the team didn't want to fuck up Simon's baby with ugly UI, the German wrath was implanted deep within and ultimately, the Bubbleship UI was by far the most researched and pampered graphic task...

    OBLIVION HUD GFX

    The team also designed all of the Machinery HUDs and various Gauges in the film, be it the Drone Machine Vision, Jack's Gun HUD, all the Scav equipment and some of Jack's smaller vehicles... The interfaces again stressed functionality over excess, keeping the Greeble under control and communicating key story points throughout the film.. All of these graphic elements were ingested by the VFX Vendors and ultimately integrated seamlessly into the live-action plates; many thanks mighty peoples...

    OBLVN Light Table UI Credit list

    Production Facility: Crater Lake Productions
    Oblivion Director: Joseph Kosinski
    Oblivion Producer: Steve Gaubs
    Oblivion Assistant Producer: David Feinblserbr

    Graphics Design Director: Bradley G Munkowitz
    Lead Graphic Designers: Bradley G Munkowitz, Jake Sargeant
    Graphic Designers: Joseph Chanimal, Alexander Perry
    Lead Graphics Animators: David Lewandowski, Joseph Chanimal
    Graphics Animator: Alexander Perry

    OBLVN Bubbleship UI Credit list

    Graphics Design Director: Bradley G Munkowitz
    Lead Graphic Designers: Bradley G Munkowitz, Joseph Chanimal
    Lead Graphics Animator: Navarro Parker
    Graphics Animator: Joseph Chanimal

    OBLVN HUD GFX Credit list

    Graphics Design Director: Bradley G Munkowitz
    Lead Graphic Designers: Joseph Chanimal, Bradley G Munkowitz
    Graphic Designer: Alexander Perry
    Lead Graphics Animators: Navarro Parker, Alexander Perry
    Graphics Animator: Joseph Chanimal

    OBLVN Process Montage Credit list

    Production Facility: Autofuss
    Design Director: Bradley G Munkowitz
    Lead Editor: Ian Colon
    Director of Photography: Ian Colon

    # vimeo.com/64377100 Uploaded 346K Plays 124 Comments
  5. zhestkov.com

    | Full Screen recommended |

    Written and Directed by: Maxim Zhestkov
    Sound design: Marcelo Baldin / Combustion
    CG: Ilya Nikolaev / Maxim Zhestkov
    Editing / Compositing: Maxim Zhestkov

    # vimeo.com/29642342 Uploaded 207K Plays 115 Comments

Aesth #1

Alexander Roberts

creepy, mysterious, future, unknown, foreboding,

http://www.imdb.com/video/imdb/vi2606799897/
http://www.themill.com/work/national-gallery-metamorphosis-titian-2012.aspx

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