1. "The story is strong, real and allegorical at the same time. Holidays on the River Yarra...is a rich, truthful, poignant but not bleak commentary on the difficulties of growing up in contemporary urban society."
    "Australia at Cannes" by Jan Epstein, Cinema Papers; Edition 84, August 1991; pp 32-33

    "Berkeley has made a 'small' film, but one rich in undercurrents...And he draws truly vivid and believable performances from his generally inexperienced cast."
    "Holidays on the River Yarra Review" by Tony Rayns, Vancouver Film Festival Program; 1991; page 26

    "Leo Berkeley has come up with an excellent debut feature...The film starts out as a seemingly typical study of teen unemployment, shifts gears into bizarre black comedy, and then takes yet another, sharper turn, providing an ending which is quite unnerving."
    "Holidays on the River Yarra Review" by David Stratton, The Australian; October 12, 1991

    "Berkeley's film displays refreshing energy and boldness in the way it plays out its story. There is a real deftness in the way Berkeley manages to maintain a tension between the gloomy realism of Brendan Lavelle's images and the prevailing comic tone. But though Holidays is frequently very funny, it never spills into farce, and it achieves some extremely effective shifts in mood. This is top-shelf low-budget film-making and the kind of film that leaves you wanting more."
    "Holidays On The River Yarra Review" by Tom Ryan, The Sunday Age; September 29, 1991

    "Rare TV screening for an unfairly forgotten Australian gem.Writer-director Leo Berkeley weaves a mesmerising spell with this strange tale. The bleak and unforgiving environment that Mick and Eddie trudge through is lovingly nurtured by Berkeley, who balances a constant undercurrent of doom with a freewheeling spirit and an endearingly naïve sense of humour."
    "Best Of Movies" by Leigh Paatsch, Herald Sun Guide; October 23, 2002; page 13

    # vimeo.com/37555913 Uploaded 111 Plays 0 Comments
  2. "The story is strong, real and allegorical at the same time. Holidays on the River Yarra...is a rich, truthful, poignant but not bleak commentary on the difficulties of growing up in contemporary urban society."
    "Australia at Cannes" by Jan Epstein, Cinema Papers; Edition 84, August 1991; pp 32-33

    "Berkeley has made a 'small' film, but one rich in undercurrents...And he draws truly vivid and believable performances from his generally inexperienced cast."
    "Holidays on the River Yarra Review" by Tony Rayns, Vancouver Film Festival Program; 1991; page 26

    "Leo Berkeley has come up with an excellent debut feature...The film starts out as a seemingly typical study of teen unemployment, shifts gears into bizarre black comedy, and then takes yet another, sharper turn, providing an ending which is quite unnerving."
    "Holidays on the River Yarra Review" by David Stratton, The Australian; October 12, 1991

    "Berkeley's film displays refreshing energy and boldness in the way it plays out its story. There is a real deftness in the way Berkeley manages to maintain a tension between the gloomy realism of Brendan Lavelle's images and the prevailing comic tone. But though Holidays is frequently very funny, it never spills into farce, and it achieves some extremely effective shifts in mood. This is top-shelf low-budget film-making and the kind of film that leaves you wanting more."
    "Holidays On The River Yarra Review" by Tom Ryan, The Sunday Age; September 29, 1991

    "Rare TV screening for an unfairly forgotten Australian gem.Writer-director Leo Berkeley weaves a mesmerising spell with this strange tale. The bleak and unforgiving environment that Mick and Eddie trudge through is lovingly nurtured by Berkeley, who balances a constant undercurrent of doom with a freewheeling spirit and an endearingly naïve sense of humour."
    "Best Of Movies" by Leigh Paatsch, Herald Sun Guide; October 23, 2002; page 13

    # vimeo.com/37538048 Uploaded 718 Plays 0 Comments
  3. A nine minute package of highlights from the micro-budget, independent three part mini-series 'Stargazers' (1999)

    # vimeo.com/41671930 Uploaded 42 Plays 0 Comments
  4. Following the adventures of five idealistic strangers in suburban Melbourne, Stargazers, a micro-budget, fully improvised 5 hour drama, is available for the first time online as a 3 part series.
    In the film, each actor created and developed their own character, nothing was put on paper and neither the director nor the actors knew what would happen in each scene until it was actually shot. Stargazers was a deliberate attempt to challenge conventional notions of length and pacing in fictional screen narratives and allow the drama and the dialogue to unfold in its own time and with its own rhythm: a story where a talk at the pub or an anecdote in the kitchen are explored for their inherent dramatic richness as much as plot twists or action sequences. A production by Leo Berkeley, with Angela McKenna, David Frazer, Luke Elliot, Caroline Lee, Damien Richardson & Jim Bridges.
    It has previously screened as part of the Melbourne Underground Film Festival (see muff.com.au/2005/content/avant.html). It has also been written about by Jake Wilson, current film critic for The Age newspaper and former co-editor of Senses of Cinema, in his review of the year 2003.
    'The very best Australian work I saw, however, and one of my personal highlights of the year, was Leo Berkeley's Stargazers, a 5-hour independent "TV series" shot on video with a minimal budget and crew and improvised performances from six wonderful actors. An inspired blend of Rivette-influenced modernism and dry, very Australian humour.'
(sensesofcinema.com/contents/04/30/favourites3.html#wilson)

    # vimeo.com/37485716 Uploaded 69 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Following the adventures of five idealistic strangers in suburban Melbourne, Stargazers, a micro-budget, fully improvised 5 hour drama, is available for the first time online as a 3 part series. In the film, each actor created and developed their own character, nothing was put on paper and neither the director nor the actors knew what would happen in each scene until it was actually shot. Stargazers was a deliberate attempt to challenge conventional notions of length and pacing in fictional screen narratives and allow the drama and the dialogue to unfold in its own time and with its own rhythm: a story where a talk at the pub or an anecdote in the kitchen are explored for their inherent dramatic richness as much as plot twists or action sequences. A production by Leo Berkeley, with Angela McKenna, David Frazer, Luke Elliot, Caroline Lee, Damien Richardson & Jim Bridges.
    It has previously screened as part of the Melbourne Underground Film Festival (see muff.com.au/2005/content/avant.html). It has also been written about by Jake Wilson, current film critic for The Age newspaper and former co-editor of Senses of Cinema, in his review of the year 2003.
    'The very best Australian work I saw, however, and one of my personal highlights of the year, was Leo Berkeley's Stargazers, a 5-hour independent "TV series" shot on video with a minimal budget and crew and improvised performances from six wonderful actors. An inspired blend of Rivette-influenced modernism and dry, very Australian humour.'
(sensesofcinema.com/contents/04/30/favourites3.html#wilson)

    # vimeo.com/37218626 Uploaded 42 Plays 0 Comments

Leo Berkeley Showcase

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Films written and directed by Leo Berkeley, covering the period 1990 to 2008.

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