1. Retired USFS fisheries biology Bob Phillips talks about the recovery of Nevada's Bruneau River that resulted from removal of cattle in the early 1990s. This video is an excerpt from Phillips's 2003 interview in WESTERN TURF WARS: THE POLITICS OF PUBLIC LANDS RANCHING (westernturfwars.com).

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  2. Being raised on a Vermont farm fostered a desire in David Gilman to pursue a career that would allow him to help farmers. At Utah State University he earned a bachelor of science degree with coursework in soils and meteorology. After his graduation he mapped soils for the USDA Soil Conservation Service (currently the Natural Resources Conservation Service) in Woodstock, Vermont, before becoming a soil scientist on the Targhee National Forest (Idaho) (currently the Caribou-Targhee National Forest) in 1974. The following year he became the zone soil scientist for the Challis (currently the Salmon-Challis National Forest) and the Sawtooth National Forest. When every national forest was subsequently assigned its own soil scientist, Gilman remained in that position on the Sawtooth until his retirement in 1994.

    In this August 2003 interview, Gilman explains how cattle grazing in the American West has led to soil erosion and soil compaction, which together have reduced soil productivity. This video is an excerpt from Gilman's interview in Mike Hudak's book WESTERN TURF WARS: THE POLITICS OF PUBLIC LANDS RANCHING (westernturfwars.com).

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  3. During his 31-year career with the U.S. Forest Service, Bill Worf held positions as district ranger, staff officer, forest supervisor, and regional director. After his retirement, he co-founded the environmental organization Wilderness Watch, an organization dedicated to protecting the lands and waters in the national Wilderness Preservation System. Through his work with Wilderness Watch, Worf closely followed the management of livestock grazing in the South Warner Wilderness of northeastern California. In this video, Worf speaks about his management-related conversations with South Warner Wilderness District Ranger Edith Asrow.

    This video is an excerpt from Bill Worf's interview in WESTERN TURF WARS: THE POLITICS OF PUBLIC LANDS RANCHING ( westernturfwars.com ).

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  4. After retiring from a 31-year Forest Service career that included positions as district ranger, staff officer, forest supervisor, and regional director, Bill Worf co-founded the group Wilderness Watch, under whose auspices he investigated environmental conditions at California's South Warner Wilderness. In this video, Worf describes environmental damage caused by the grazing of cattle and sheep at Pine Creek Basin. And he explains how rural social pressure can lead Forest Service employees to approve livestock management that favors ranchers, while being detrimental to the environment.

    This video is an excerpt from Bill Worf's interview in WESTERN TURF WARS: THE POLITICS OF PUBLIC LANDS RANCHING ( westernturfwars.com ).

    # vimeo.com/41061992 Uploaded 7 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Following his 31-year career with the U.S. Forest Service that included positions as district ranger, forest supervisor, and regional director, Bill Worf co-founded Wilderness Watch, a national environmental organization concerned with the management of existing wilderness. Under the auspices of that organization, he investigated environmental conditions at California's South Warner Wilderness. In this video, Worf talks about flood damage on the wilderness's South Parker Creek that resulted from overgrazing by cattle in the wilderness uplands.

    This video is an excerpt from Bill Worf's interview in WESTERN TURF WARS: THE POLITICS OF PUBLIC LANDS RANCHING ( westernturfwars.com ).

    # vimeo.com/38709717 Uploaded 12 Plays 0 Comments

Public Lands Ranching

Mike Hudak

Grassroots conservationists and former government employees talk about ranching on western public lands of the United States.

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