1. Teki Dalton's Kidney Cancer story: Teki was an active member of his community and assisted many organisational boards as a member. He was a Paul Harris Fellow, for his work in Rotary and the community. He ran Safety and Sea Survival Courses for his own Sailing School and competed either as crew, sailing master, navigator or skipper in fifteen Sydney to Hobart Races. He crossed the China Sea and raced in the Mediterranean, the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans and represented Australia in yachting.

    Need information on kidney cancer - go Kidney Health Australia site kidney.org.au or call our Kidney Cancer Information Service on 1800 454 363.

    # vimeo.com/51265986 Uploaded
  2. KIDNEY STORIES Toolkit educates on kidney disease using culturally sensitive drawings with minimal wording. It is designed to be used with your health care team so they can answer questions you may have. Key messages are presented with simple graphics and diagrams.

    Kidney Health Australia is proud to host this important resource as part of our education program for Indigenous Australians. It could also be used for those with English as a second language.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that some resources below may contain drawings, images or voices of people who have died.

    Kidney Health Australia is proud to host the KIDNEY STORIES toolkit as part of our education program for Indigenous Australians. This resource may be helpful educating anyone with English as a second language.
    Go to kidney.org.au/your-kidneys/support/indigenous-resources/kidney-stories

    KIDNEY STORIES Toolkit offers flipcharts, CD version and DVDs which tells these individual stories:
    No 1: The work of your kidneys
    No 2: When your kidneys get sick
    No 3: Living with Kidney Disease
    No 4: Treatment options and pathways
    No 5: Haemodialysis
    No 6: Peritoneal dialysis
    No 7: Fistula and Catheter
    No 8: Diet and kidney disease
    No 9a: Palliative care for people with sick kidneys
    No 9b: Palliative care for people with sick kidneys
    No 10: Transplant 1 to 4: *Introduction *Tests required *Surgery *Life after transplant

    A range of posters support this education resource. DVDs are available for health professionals who wish to use them as a support resource.

    After watching this video, if you have questions, you should talk to your healthcare mob for answers. You may also call our Kidney Health Information Service on freecall 1800 454 363.

    Credit: ’Kidney Stories’ Toolkit produced by NT Renal Services. For background call Susan Poppe on 08 8999 2406 or email susan.poppe@nt.gov.au

    KIDNEY STORIES Toolkit is available from Darwin University Print Shop - Scott Chamberlain on 08 8946 6300, email uniprint@cdu.edu.au or visit cdu.edu.au

    # vimeo.com/53304309 Uploaded

Kidney Cancer

Kidney Health Australia Plus

Kidney cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the cells of the kidney.

Cancer is caused by the rapid abnormal overgrowth of cells within the kidney. Our bodies are always making new cells: so we can grow, to replace worn-out cells, or heal damaged…


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Kidney cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the cells of the kidney.

Cancer is caused by the rapid abnormal overgrowth of cells within the kidney. Our bodies are always making new cells: so we can grow, to replace worn-out cells, or heal damaged cells after injury. This process is controlled by certain genes and all cancers are caused by changes to these genes.

Changes to our genes usually happen during our lifetime, although a small number of people inherit such a change from a parent.

As with all cancers, kidney cancers begin small and grow larger over time. Kidney cancers usually grow as a single mass but more than one tumour may occur in one or both kidneys. These lumps can be benign (not cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign lumps do not spread to other parts of the body.

When it first develops, a malignant tumour is confined to its original site. If cancer is treated in its early stages, the potential for cure of the cancer can be very good. If these cells are not treated, they may spread into surrounding tissue and to other parts of the body. When these cells reach a new site they may continue to grow and form another tumour at that site.

Primary cancer:-
has not spread to the kidney from somewhere else. It is mostly a disease seen in adults over 40.

Secondary cancers or “metastases”:-
is cancer that has spread from somewhere else in the body. Secondary cancer in the kidney is more common than primary kidney cancer.

The average age of people found to have kidney cancer is 55 years. The disease is rare in children.

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