1. (Marquette, MI) – The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) is working with youth, Native American tribes and many groups to fight invasive plants – and restore indigenous vegetation that is best for pollinators like bees and butterflies

    Invasive (non-native) plants are choking out natural flora and fauna – and are one of many reasons that one-third of pollinators have disappeared

    On a cold wind-driven rainy fall day in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula just blocks from the roaring waves of Lake Superior, a conference was held for the many federal, state and local agencies and organizations that are on the front line of the fight to eradicate all forms of invasive species.

    The menace is as tricky as it is widespread and costly to stop – invasive species ride on the wind, float on the water and find all forms of human transportation to creep their way across the Midwest – and the entire country.

    From stubborn non-native weeds that travel with and on unsuspecting tourists to aquatic life like Zebra mussels that hitch a ride on ore boats and ocean freighters.

    USFS Eastern Region Botanist Jan Schultz was the keynote speaker on Tues., Oct. 16, 2012 at the Rapid Response Invasive Plant Intervention Team of the U.P. (RIPP IT UP) Third Annual Northern Great Lakes Conference named “A United Front against Invasive Species” in the Marquette Masonic Lodge and Center.

    The Marquette, Michigan presentation by Schultz titled “An Overview of Just How Far We’ve Come in the Battle against Invasive Species” was watched by many USFS employees and several groups assisting in the fight to stop invasive non-native weeds that are choking out all forms of wildlife.

    Schultz is the USFS Non-native Invasive Species and Special Forest Products Program Leader stationed in Milwaukee, WI.

    The hosts of the conference are one of the main northern Michigan groups fighting Invasives – and the group has a catching acronym for their long name: RIPP IT UP stands for Rapid Response Invasive Plant Intervention Team of the U.P.

    Related info/websites/contacts:

    Rapid Response Invasive Plant Intervention Team of the U.P. (RIPP IT UP)
    garlicmustardchallenge2010.wordpress.com/2010/06/29/rrip-it-up-rapid-response-invasive-plant-intervention-team-upper-peninsula
    uprcd.org/uprcd3157921.asp
    abc10up.com/invasive-plants-conference

    Darcy Rutkowski
    906-225-0215
    darcy.rutkowski@uprcd.org

    Stephanie Blumer
    906-643-7900 ext. 155
    sblumer@fs.fed.us

    Tesha Zimmerman
    906-632-5575
    tzimmerman@saulttribe.net

    Lynn Steiner
    Wild Rivers Invasive Species Coordinator
    c/o Dickinson Conservation District
    102 North Hooper St.
    Kingsford, MI
    49802-4548

    906-239-2560
    wildriverscwma@gmail.com

    2006 Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI), an interagency program led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
    United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)/United States Forest Service (USFS)
    FY 2011 Accomplishments Fighting Invasive Species in the Upper Mid-West
    USFS Eastern Region 9
    Non-Native Invasive Species (NNIS) Report
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers/invasives/documents/FY2011EasternRegionNNISReport.pdf
    fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5387670.pdf

    Fighting Invasive Species through Cooperative Weed Management Areas (CWMA)
    Region 9 CWMAs - Assisted by Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI)
    USFS Eastern Region Success story

    By Jan Schultz

    The GLRI action plan (2010 - 2014) was developed by a task force of 16 federal departments and agencies to implement this initiative and provides accountability by including measures of progress and benchmarks for success.

    It calls for aggressive efforts to address five urgent priority focus areas:

    Cleaning up toxics and toxic hot spot areas of concern
    Combating invasive species
    Promoting near-shore health by protecting watersheds from polluted run-off
    Restoring wetlands and other habitats
    Working with strategic partners on outreach

    This historic opportunity has allowed several R9 Forests to establish and grow their Cooperative Weed Management Areas (CWMA) providing:

    Education and awareness
    Prevention
    Early detection
    Rapid response
    Monitoring
    Integrated pest management

    CWMA Map (87 CWMAs in Midwest, Northeast)
    na.fs.fed.us/fhp/invasive_plants/cwma

    CWMA Cookbook: A Recipe for Success
    mipn.org/CWMACookbook2011.pdf

    USFS
    fs.fed.us
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers

    Larry Stritch
    USDA USFS National Botanist
    Washington, D.C.
    202-205-1279
    lstritch@fs.fed.us

    Jan Schultz, USFS
    E. Region 9 Botanist
    Milwaukee, WI
    414-297-1189
    jschultz@fs.fed.us

    Larry Heady
    R9 Tribal Relations Specialist
    414-297-3777
    lheady@fs.fed.us

    Stephanie Blumer
    R9 Botanist
    906-643-7900 Ext. 155
    sblumer@fs.fed.us

    Hiawatha National Forest
    Gladstone, MI
    906-428-5800
    HiawathaNF@fs.fed.us
    fs.usda.gov/hiawatha

    Chequamegon Nicolet National Forest
    Northwoods CWMA
    northwoodscwma.org

    # vimeo.com/52928210 Uploaded 43 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  2. (Marquette, MI) – The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) is working with youth, Native American tribes and many groups to fight invasive plants – and restore indigenous vegetation that is best for pollinators like bees and butterflies

    Invasive (non-native) plants are choking out natural flora and fauna – and are one of many reasons that one-third of pollinators have disappeared

    On a cold wind-driven rainy fall day in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula just blocks from the roaring waves of Lake Superior, a conference was held for the many federal, state and local agencies and organizations that are on the front line of the fight to eradicate all forms of invasive species.

    The menace is as tricky as it is widespread and costly to stop – invasive species ride on the wind, float on the water and find all forms of human transportation to creep their way across the Midwest – and the entire country.

    From stubborn non-native weeds that travel with and on unsuspecting tourists to aquatic life like Zebra mussels that hitch a ride on ore boats and ocean freighters.

    USFS Eastern Region Botanist Jan Schultz was the keynote speaker on Tues., Oct. 16, 2012 at the Rapid Response Invasive Plant Intervention Team of the U.P.! (RIPP IT UP!) Third Annual Northern Great Lakes Conference named “A United Front against Invasive Species” in the Marquette Masonic Lodge and Center.

    The Marquette, Michigan presentation by Schultz titled “An Overview of Just How Far We’ve Come in the Battle against Invasive Species” was watched by many USFS employees and several groups assisting in the fight to stop invasive non-native weeds that are choking out all forms of wildlife.

    Schultz is the USFS Non-native Invasive Species and Special Forest Products Program Leader stationed in Milwaukee, WI.

    The hosts of the conference are one of the main northern Michigan groups fighting Invasives – and the group has a catching acronym for their long name: RIPP IT UP stands for Rapid Response Invasive Plant Intervention Team of the U.P.

    Rapid Response Invasive Plant Intervention Team of the U.P. (RIPP IT UP)
    abc10up.com/invasive-plants-conference

    Darcy Rutkowski
    906-225-0215
    darcy.rutkowski@uprcd.org

    Stephanie Blumer
    906-643-7900 ext. 155
    sblumer@fs.fed.us

    Tesha Zimmerman
    906-632-5575
    tzimmerman@saulttribe.net

    Lynn Steiner
    Wild Rivers Invasive Species Coordinator
    Dickinson Conservation District
    102 North Hooper St.
    Kingsford, MI
    49802-4548

    906-239-2560
    wildriverscwma@gmail.com

    FY 2011 Accomplishments Fighting Invasive Species USFS Eastern Region 9 Non-Native Invasive Species (NNIS) Report
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers/invasives/documents/FY2011EasternRegionNNISReport.pdf
    fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5387670.pdf

    CWMA Map
    na.fs.fed.us/fhp/invasive_plants/cwma

    CWMA Cookbook: A Recipe for Success
    A Step-by-Step Guide: How to develop Cooperative Weed Management Area (CWMA)
    mipn.org/CWMACookbook2011.pdf

    USFS
    fs.fed.us
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers

    Larry Stritch
    USDA USFS National Botanist
    Washington, D.C.
    202-205-1279
    lstritch@fs.fed.us

    Jan Schultz, USFS
    E. Region 9 Botanist
    Milwaukee, WI
    414-297-1189
    jschultz@fs.fed.us

    Larry Heady
    R9 Tribal Relations Specialist
    414-297-3777
    lheady@fs.fed.us

    Stephanie Blumer
    R9 Botanist
    906-643-7900 Ext. 155
    sblumer@fs.fed.us

    Hiawatha National Forest
    Gladstone, MI
    906-428-5800
    HiawathaNF@fs.fed.us
    fs.usda.gov/hiawatha

    Chequamegon Nicolet National Forest
    Northwoods CWMA
    northwoodscwma.org

    Matt Bushman, district botanist
    715-373-3667
    Darienne McNamara, CWMA Coordinator
    darienne.mcnamara@gmail.com

    Hiawatha National Forest
    Central Upper Peninsula CWMA
    Chippewa East Mackinac Conservation District
    clmcd.org/weedmanagement_2.asp
    chipmackconservation.org
    upicweeds.org

    Nick Cassel, Coordinator
    Chippewa Luce Mackinac Conservation District
    Sault Ste. Marie, MI
    906-635-1278 (wk)
    906-430-0040 (cell)
    nick.cassel@macd.org

    Ottawa National Forest
    Western Peninsula Invasive Coalition (WePic)
    Gogebic County, MI/Iron County, WI
    invasiveplantsmi.org/hogweed/index.html
    fs.fed.us/r9/ottawa/forest_management/botany/cwpma_site

    Ian Shackleford
    USFS Botanist
    Noxious Weed Coordinator
    Ironwood, MI
    896-932-1330
    ishackleford@fs.fed.us

    Wild Rivers Invasive Species Coalition (WRISC)
    wrisc.org

    Ann Hruska
    Administrator/Proj. Mgr.
    Dickinson Conservation District
    Kingsford, MI
    906-774-8441
    wildriverscwma@gmail.com
    ann.hruska@mi.nacdnet.net

    Keweenaw Invasive Species Management Area (KISMA)
    kisma.org

    Janet Marr, Coordinator
    Houghton Keweenaw Conservation District
    Houghton, MI
    906-337-5529
    906-482-0214
    jkmarr@mtu.edu
    sue.haralson@mi.nacdnet.net

    Huron Manistee National Forest
    Northwest Michigan CWMA
    garlic-mustard.org

    Carolyn Henne, USFS
    231-723-2211
    Robert Makowski, USFS
    231-775-5023

    # vimeo.com/54674861 Uploaded 37 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  3. (Marquette, MI) – An Interfaith Energy Conservation and Community Garden Initiative across the Upper Peninsula will see the creation of 30 native plants gardens and free energy audits for 40 houses of worship plus grants to help make repairs to reduce airborne mercury from entering Lakes Michigan and Superior in an effort named EarthKeepers II and made possible by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

    A press conference (1-18-13) announcing the plans in Marquette, MI was hosted by the Northern Michigan University EarthKeepers II Student Team: Katelin Bingner, Tom Merkel and Adam Magnuson.

    The NMU students are planning to write and record public service messages with energy conservation tips, information on protecting the Great Lakes and about the importance of native plants restoration – with assistance from U.P. radio stations, newspapers and television stations.

    The EarthKeepers II Initiative is sponsored by the churches/temples of 10 faith traditions that were involved in the original Earth Keeper Initiative (2004-2009): Roman Catholic, Episcopal, Jewish, Lutheran, Presbyterian, United Methodist, Bahá'í, Unitarian Universalist, Zen Buddhist.

    Speakers were Bishops and other denominational leaders from 10 faith communities plus U.S. Forest Service (USFS) Regional Botanist Jan Schultz, Delta Green Ex. Dir. Doug Russell and Cedar Tree Institute Ex. Dir. Rev. Jon Magnuson.

    The EarthKeepers II projects include energy conservation audits at 40 U.P. churches/temples plus grants ranging from $500 to $1,000 for each site to assist in changes/repairs.

    The faith communities are demonstrating the importance of energy conservation to lower utility bills and reduce and prevent toxins/pollution including airborne mercury from entering Lake Superior as part of the EPA Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

    Congregations will be given info on energy conservation kits and utility company rebates to lower household bills.

    The energy conservation audits include insulation (walls/roof), lighting fixtures, ventilation, and heating systems like boilers/furnaces that may be updated with new controls, repaired or replaced.

    The project : 30 community gardens (2 per county/more possible). These gardens will grow native (indigenous) plants and vegetables for community distribution and food pantries.

    The nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette has been involved in U.P. native plant restoration to fight invasive species that are vital to the health of all wildlife. For example, the U.P. is on a flight path for migrating Monarch butterflies who depend on milkweed for food and reproduction.

    Project participants: Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute, EPA, USFS Eastern Region 9 technical assistance, nonprofit Delta Green, U.P. Ojibwa (Anishinaabe) communities and Borealis Seed Company in Big Bay, MI

    Religious community leaders signed the northern Michigan Earth Keeper Covenant in 2004 pledging to actively participate in environment projects, build bridges with other faiths and reach out to Native American communities.

    EarthKeepers II is the next phase of the Earth Keeper Initiative that held three Earth Day Clean Sweeps involving 150 churches/temples plus planted 12,000 trees during a summer with severe U.P. forest fires.

    U.P. Earth Keepers Clean Sweeps (2005-2007) had free Earth Day collection sites across a 400-mile area of northern Michigan.

    Over 15,000 residents turned in 320 tons of e-waste (old computers/cell phones), 45 tons of Household Hazardous Waste including car batteries, oil-based paint, pesticides, liquid mercury, and other common poisons; and over a ton of pharmaceuticals including $500,000 in narcotics.

    The hazardous waste was either recycled or properly disposed.

    EarthKeepers II website
    EarthKeepersUP.org
    Social sites:
    EarthKeepersII.blogspot.com
    facebook.com/EarthKeepersII
    vimeo.com/EarthKeepersII
    twitter.com/EarthKeeperTeam
    pinterest.com/EarthKeepersII/
    pinterest.com/EarthKeepersII/EarthKeepers-II-and-the-EPA-Great-Lakes-Restoratio/

    Rev. Jon Magnuson
    Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute (CTI)
    403 E. Michigan St.
    Marquette, MI

    906-228-5494
    906-360-5072 (cell)
    magnusonx2@charter.net

    CedarTreeInstitute.org
    wingsandseeds.org

    Kyra Fillmore Ziomkowski
    Project Coordinator
    906-250-7643
    kyra.fillmore@gmail.com

    Greg Peterson
    Volunteer media advisor
    906-401-0109
    EarthKeepersII@gmail.com

    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative
    greatlakesrestoration.us
    epa.gov

    Jan Schultz,
    USFS Eastern Region Botanist
    414-297-1189
    jschultz@fs.fed.us

    fs.fed.us/wildflowers
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers/invasives
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers/ethnobotany

    Doug Russell
    Delta Green Ex. Dir.
    drussell@deltagreenusa.org

    Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
    kbic-nsn.gov

    # vimeo.com/58888316 Uploaded 20 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  4. (Marquette, MI) – An Interfaith Energy Conservation and Community Garden Initiative across the Upper Peninsula will see the creation of 30 native plants gardens and free energy audits for 40 houses of worship plus grants to help make repairs to reduce airborne mercury from entering Lakes Michigan and Superior in an effort named EarthKeepers II and made possible by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

    A press conference (1-18-13) announcing the plans in Marquette, MI was hosted by the Northern Michigan University EarthKeepers II Student Team: Katelin Bingner, Tom Merkel and Adam Magnuson.

    The NMU students are planning to write and record public service messages with energy conservation tips, information on protecting the Great Lakes and about the importance of native plants restoration – with assistance from U.P. radio stations, newspapers and television stations.

    The EarthKeepers II Initiative is sponsored by the churches/temples of 10 faith traditions that were involved in the original Earth Keeper Initiative (2004-2009): Roman Catholic, Episcopal, Jewish, Lutheran, Presbyterian, United Methodist, Bahá'í, Unitarian Universalist, Zen Buddhist.

    Speakers were Bishops and other denominational leaders from 10 faith communities plus U.S. Forest Service (USFS) Regional Botanist Jan Schultz, Delta Green Ex. Dir. Doug Russell and Cedar Tree Institute Ex. Dir. Rev. Jon Magnuson.

    The EarthKeepers II projects include energy conservation audits at 40 U.P. churches/temples plus grants ranging from $500 to $1,000 for each site to assist in changes/repairs.

    The faith communities are demonstrating the importance of energy conservation to lower utility bills and reduce and prevent toxins/pollution including airborne mercury from entering Lake Superior as part of the EPA Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

    Congregations will be given info on energy conservation kits and utility company rebates to lower household bills.

    The energy conservation audits include insulation (walls/roof), lighting fixtures, ventilation, and heating systems like boilers/furnaces that may be updated with new controls, repaired or replaced.

    The project : 30 community gardens (2 per county/more possible). These gardens will grow native (indigenous) plants and vegetables for community distribution and food pantries.

    The nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette has been involved in U.P. native plant restoration to fight invasive species that are vital to the health of all wildlife. For example, the U.P. is on a flight path for migrating Monarch butterflies who depend on milkweed for food and reproduction.

    Project participants: Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute, EPA, USFS Eastern Region 9 technical assistance, nonprofit Delta Green, U.P. Ojibwa (Anishinaabe) communities and Borealis Seed Company in Big Bay, MI

    Religious community leaders signed the northern Michigan Earth Keeper Covenant in 2004 pledging to actively participate in environment projects, build bridges with other faiths and reach out to Native American communities.

    EarthKeepers II is the next phase of the Earth Keeper Initiative that held three Earth Day Clean Sweeps involving 150 churches/temples plus planted 12,000 trees during a summer with severe U.P. forest fires.

    U.P. Earth Keepers Clean Sweeps (2005-2007) had free Earth Day collection sites across a 400-mile area of northern Michigan.

    Over 15,000 residents turned in 320 tons of e-waste (old computers/cell phones), 45 tons of Household Hazardous Waste including car batteries, oil-based paint, pesticides, liquid mercury, and other common poisons; and over a ton of pharmaceuticals including $500,000 in narcotics.

    The hazardous waste was either recycled or properly disposed.

    EarthKeepers II website
    EarthKeepersUP.org
    Social sites:
    EarthKeepersII.blogspot.com
    facebook.com/EarthKeepersII
    vimeo.com/EarthKeepersII
    twitter.com/EarthKeeperTeam
    pinterest.com/EarthKeepersII/
    pinterest.com/EarthKeepersII/EarthKeepers-II-and-the-EPA-Great-Lakes-Restoratio/

    Rev. Jon Magnuson
    Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute (CTI)
    403 E. Michigan St.
    Marquette, MI

    906-228-5494
    906-360-5072 (cell)
    magnusonx2@charter.net

    CedarTreeInstitute.org
    wingsandseeds.org

    Kyra Fillmore Ziomkowski
    Project Coordinator
    906-250-7643
    kyra.fillmore@gmail.com

    Greg Peterson
    Volunteer media advisor
    906-401-0109
    EarthKeepersII@gmail.com

    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative
    greatlakesrestoration.us
    epa.gov

    Jan Schultz,
    USFS Eastern Region Botanist
    414-297-1189
    jschultz@fs.fed.us

    fs.fed.us/wildflowers
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers/invasives
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers/ethnobotany

    Doug Russell
    Delta Green Ex. Dir.
    drussell@deltagreenusa.org

    Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
    kbic-nsn.gov

    # vimeo.com/58888315 Uploaded 48 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  5. (Marquette, MI) – An Interfaith Energy Conservation and Community Garden Initiative across the Upper Peninsula will see the creation of 30 native plants gardens and free energy audits for 40 houses of worship plus grants to help make repairs to reduce airborne mercury from entering Lakes Michigan and Superior in an effort named EarthKeepers II and made possible by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

    A press conference (1-18-13) announcing the plans in Marquette, MI was hosted by the Northern Michigan University EarthKeepers II Student Team: Katelin Bingner, Tom Merkel and Adam Magnuson.

    The NMU students are planning to write and record public service messages with energy conservation tips, information on protecting the Great Lakes and about the importance of native plants restoration – with assistance from U.P. radio stations, newspapers and television stations.

    The EarthKeepers II Initiative is sponsored by the churches/temples of 10 faith traditions that were involved in the original Earth Keeper Initiative (2004-2009): Roman Catholic, Episcopal, Jewish, Lutheran, Presbyterian, United Methodist, Bahá'í, Unitarian Universalist, Zen Buddhist.

    Speakers were Bishops and other denominational leaders from 10 faith communities plus U.S. Forest Service (USFS) Regional Botanist Jan Schultz, Delta Green Ex. Dir. Doug Russell and Cedar Tree Institute Ex. Dir. Rev. Jon Magnuson.

    The EarthKeepers II projects include energy conservation audits at 40 U.P. churches/temples plus grants ranging from $500 to $1,000 for each site to assist in changes/repairs.

    The faith communities are demonstrating the importance of energy conservation to lower utility bills and reduce and prevent toxins/pollution including airborne mercury from entering Lake Superior as part of the EPA Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

    Congregations will be given info on energy conservation kits and utility company rebates to lower household bills.

    The energy conservation audits include insulation (walls/roof), lighting fixtures, ventilation, and heating systems like boilers/furnaces that may be updated with new controls, repaired or replaced.

    The project : 30 community gardens (2 per county/more possible). These gardens will grow native (indigenous) plants and vegetables for community distribution and food pantries.

    The nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette has been involved in U.P. native plant restoration to fight invasive species that are vital to the health of all wildlife. For example, the U.P. is on a flight path for migrating Monarch butterflies who depend on milkweed for food and reproduction.

    Project participants: Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute, EPA, USFS Eastern Region 9 technical assistance, nonprofit Delta Green, U.P. Ojibwa (Anishinaabe) communities and Borealis Seed Company in Big Bay, MI

    Religious community leaders signed the northern Michigan Earth Keeper Covenant in 2004 pledging to actively participate in environment projects, build bridges with other faiths and reach out to Native American communities.

    EarthKeepers II is the next phase of the Earth Keeper Initiative that held three Earth Day Clean Sweeps involving 150 churches/temples plus planted 12,000 trees during a summer with severe U.P. forest fires.

    U.P. Earth Keepers Clean Sweeps (2005-2007) had free Earth Day collection sites across a 400-mile area of northern Michigan.

    Over 15,000 residents turned in 320 tons of e-waste (old computers/cell phones), 45 tons of Household Hazardous Waste including car batteries, oil-based paint, pesticides, liquid mercury, and other common poisons; and over a ton of pharmaceuticals including $500,000 in narcotics.

    The hazardous waste was either recycled or properly disposed.

    EarthKeepers II website
    EarthKeepersUP.org
    Social sites:
    EarthKeepersII.blogspot.com
    facebook.com/EarthKeepersII
    vimeo.com/EarthKeepersII
    twitter.com/EarthKeeperTeam
    pinterest.com/EarthKeepersII/
    pinterest.com/EarthKeepersII/EarthKeepers-II-and-the-EPA-Great-Lakes-Restoratio/

    Rev. Jon Magnuson
    Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute (CTI)
    403 E. Michigan St.
    Marquette, MI

    906-228-5494
    906-360-5072 (cell)
    magnusonx2@charter.net

    CedarTreeInstitute.org
    wingsandseeds.org

    Kyra Fillmore Ziomkowski
    Project Coordinator
    906-250-7643
    kyra.fillmore@gmail.com

    Greg Peterson
    Volunteer media advisor
    906-401-0109
    EarthKeepersII@gmail.com

    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative
    greatlakesrestoration.us
    epa.gov

    Jan Schultz,
    USFS Eastern Region Botanist
    414-297-1189
    jschultz@fs.fed.us

    fs.fed.us/wildflowers
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers/invasives
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers/ethnobotany

    Doug Russell
    Delta Green Ex. Dir.
    drussell@deltagreenusa.org

    Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
    kbic-nsn.gov

    # vimeo.com/58888317 Uploaded 58 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

Fighting to Save Our Environment and Thus Humans

Greg Peterson

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