1. This is an edited version of a much longer piece first projected as part of Winnipeg's Nuit Blanche festivities (curated by Joe Kalturnyk). The piece was expanded for the current show Another Atlas at RAW:Gallery, and the most current version can be seen there until 6 April 2013. The film uses Google Earth to track along the 49th parallel, that is, the prairie border between Canada and the United States. It's about a few other parallels: parallel countries, parallel modes of imaging and imagining, parallels between political, technical, and visual territories. If you follow it long enough, digital anomalies in the image become apparent; they have to do with when a given area came under the eye of a satellite, and at what resolution. One of the things I find interesting about them is that they become landscapes in their own right, with their own boundaries, topography, areas of density and intensity. Something similar happens at the edges between satellite image tiles; their seams are rarely perfect, and we end up with one image blurred or spliced into another, contradictory image. The boundaries between these territories of image are sometimes subtle, at other times blatant. They're especially visible along a political border like this. While they never equate to the border -- there's usually a displacement of some sort -- they do parallel it. In fact they're more visible than the border itself, which is otherwise realized mainly in agricultural boundaries. All of these anomolies in an ostensibly perfect map of the world invite interpretation, speculation, and imagination. This is the first of a series of explorations I plan to make using Google Earth and other imaging tools. Some of the thinking behind this will be published in November in the essay "(e)SCAPE" in Warehouse, an annual book published by the University of Manitoba's Faculty of Architecture.

    Music: Richmond by Scott Allison & Jeff Surak (zeromoon.com/?tag=all-violet)

    # vimeo.com/50751942 Uploaded
  2. These images give an idea of the work produced associated with my post-doc project Beyond the Desert of the Real (U of Manitoba, 2009-2011). Most of the videos were by graduate architecture students; a few by myself from my own footage and from videos shot by recent newcomers to Winnipeg. A selection of the films can be viewed in their entirety at the Lost Spaces showreel at this page: vimeo.com/40097292. Many of the videos are also online at: youtube.com/user/BeyondTheDesert/videos. The videos were an element in the mapping of the city, and the project culminated in an installation at RAW:Gallery: éCartographies, which projected these videos onto a gallery-scale, fragmented, map of the city. That was accompanied by soundscapes from the student films; you hear some of this here. éCartographies is also documented on this vimeo page: vimeo.com/25262030. About the same time I was working on éCartographies, I worked with 5468796 (who produced the architectural renderings here) & Jean Trottier on an entry for the 2011 Living Cities Design Competition: Zip City, a proposal for densifying Winnipeg by exploiting space over existing roadways.

    # vimeo.com/40097290 Uploaded
  3. Submission for Art's Birthday / Lite Nite, Feb. 2012.

    # vimeo.com/35259652 Uploaded
  4. This is a first shot at a short film I'm making, exploring fragmented views of this city through an equally fragmented melange of media. The film will be based on interviews with recent newcomers, talking about their first experiences of the city; and it will step back and forth between digital models, video, and film. Still working out the bugs; this is just a test, and a silent one at that. I am indebted to the help of architecture firm 5468796 (5468796.ca) for their help with the model. I was awarded a Winnipeg Film Group First Film Fund grant to create the entire piece. I still owe them that film. It's coming.

    # vimeo.com/41467673 Uploaded
  5. This is the most recent iteration of parallel. It was included in the exhibition "Coding and Decoding Borders at the Dawn of the 21st Century" (April 13-May 31, 2016) at Espace Architecture Flagey-Université libre de Bruxelles, Belgium (antiatlas.net/coder-et-decoder-les-frontieres-lexposition/). It's also featured in the 2016 spring edition of The Site Magazine (thesitemagazine.com/online/parallel).

    A 7-hr version of the piece was screened at Inter/Access Gallery in Toronto (interaccess.org/exhibition/once-nothing-drone-art-exhibition) from Feb. 7-April 2 of 2016. Thank you to the Winnipeg Arts Council, the Manitoba Arts Council, and the Canada Council for funding my travel to the opening of Once Is Nothing.

    parallel uses Google Earth to track along the 49th parallel, that is, the western border between Canada and the United States. It's about a few other parallels: parallel countries, parallel modes of imaging and imagining, parallels between political, technical, and visual territories. If you follow it long enough, digital anomalies in the image become apparent; they have to do with when a given area came under the eye of a satellite, and at what resolution. These become landscapes in their own right, with their own boundaries, topography, areas of density and intensity. Something similar happens at the edges between satellite image tiles; their seams are rarely perfect, and we end up with one image blurred or spliced into another, contradictory image. The boundaries between these territories of image are especially visible along a political border like this. While they never equate to the border -- there's usually a displacement of some sort -- they do parallel it. In fact they're more visible than the border itself, which is otherwise realized mainly in agricultural boundaries. All of these anomalies in an ostensibly perfect map of the world invite interpretation, speculation, and imagination.

    parallel IV runs the full length of the border from the Strait of Georgia in the west to Lake of the Woods in the east, where the political border diverges from the 49th parallel in a sudden jog north. parallel is the first of a series of explorations using Google Earth and other aerial imaging tools; the second was Transect, which follows the Prime Meridian and Antimeridian around the planet, and was projected at Greenwich, England (which is where these of course originate) in the summer of 2014:
    vimeo.com/105305737
    I am currently developing a new project, Dominion, with a research/creation grant in media art from the Canada Council.

    Sound for parallel comprises three superimposed tracks:
    Ambient Nothingness, by Hello Flowers, courtesy the Internet Archive, modified
    Kibo (Japanese Experiment Module, International Space Station) Ambient Sound, courtesy Christopher Hadfield
    Audio from a General Atomics MQ-9 Reaper / Predator B drone, modified.

    # vimeo.com/64061190 Uploaded

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