1. Flies is an example of a "2D choreography" which, in performance, is presented onstage, captured in real-time and simultaneously projected.
The image above presents to a low-res quicktime of flies.

    developed within the context of abacusParts

    concept, realisation and artistic direction: Romy Achituv and Danielle Wilde

    with: Yasmeen Godder and Charlotte Griffin.

    # vimeo.com/54494583 Uploaded
  2. Romy Achituv and Danielle Wilde
    (conception, creation and performance)

    the story relates a personal experience on the New York Subway D train, travelling from Manhattan to Brooklyn. In performance, what you see in the video is created live on stage, captured real-time from above, and rear-projected onto a video screen that floats, suspended in space, above and behind the performers.

    # vimeo.com/54354151 Uploaded
  3. an investigation of the introduction of digital space into a performative context (NYC, 1997-99)
    Conceived, produced, and artistic directed by Romy Achituv and Danielle Wilde.

    with: Bosmat Alon, Alison Bradley, Robert Catalano, Matt Dacy, 
Christine Doempke, Charlotte Griffin, Yasmeen Godder, Orit Kruglanski, Merrianne Moore, Sara Shira, Wei Dong, Bruno Vianna and others.

    video includes: face clamps, scanning, aquarium, reflections on the body and flies

    # vimeo.com/54494582 Uploaded
  4. a single roll of film is threaded through three different projectors. in front of each projector, a woman sits, naked, and uses her body to capture the moving image. each woman has a camera which films the image she is creating on her "bodyscreen", a monitor to control and reflect upon what she is creating and a large screen on which is projected the film moving over her moving form. The three women with their equipment sit side by side in the dark. The resulting images, three iterations stemming from the same source, invite us to consider and reflect upon our assumptions about and relationship to the human body.

    # vimeo.com/54354156 Uploaded
  5. Experiments with worn structures
which measure the opening and closing of the mouth

    We move the mouth to speak, yet do we speak when moving the mouth? FaceClamps physically extrude the face to magnify and measure the subtle gesticulations of our mouth along two axes, transforming these movements into rich textural soundscapes that offer an alternative to verbal communication. As the mouth moves, the sonic output starts and restarts, shifts register, falters, hesitates and starts again. Language breaks down, loops and becomes abstract textures interwoven with algorithmically controlled sounds. Seemingly unpredictable, the evolving soundscape prompts the performers to extend and exaggerate their mouth movements in an attempt to gain control. Frustration and determination are at times etched in their distorted faces as misunderstandings seem inevitable as interpretation of the sonic output is completely open to subjective response and there seems very little basis for common ground.

    FaceClamps effectively act as a kind of translation-pantograph, translating and exaggerating from movement to sound in real-time. Mechanically magnifying the normally subtle movements of the mouth increases both visual and mechanical resolution, and the need for control leads to an exaggeration of the wearers’ use of their jaws and mouths.

    FaceClamps were created in response to the conviction that language is an inadequate tool for communication. Many people struggle with language, and while it’s common knowledge that body language is a highly expressive component of communication, formalised understandings and interpretations of body language seem somehow stilted and sterile, lacking in emotive texture. Using the horizontal and vertical axes of the mouth to trigger and control sound in real-time is, arguably, arbitrary, yet the mouth is an intimate element of verbal communication. The rich sonic textures that result with the use of faceClamps reflect the underlying communicative struggle, and are suggestive of the rich complexity of the communication process. The sonic output of provides a stark contrast to traditional forms of body language. The faceClamps are difficult to wear, just as it is sometimes difficult to communicate succinctly. They thus embody the experience of verbal communication in both functionality and aesthetic.

    Concept, realisation and artistic direction: Danielle Wilde and Romy Achituv

    Performance: Yasmeen Godder and Danielle Wilde

    Sound Design: Robert Catalano
    
Video: Romy Achituv


    # vimeo.com/54354154 Uploaded

abacusParts

danielle wilde Plus

abacusParts was an investigation of the introduction of digital space into a performative context, that took place in NYC, 1997-99. The project was conceived, produced, and artistic directed by Romy Achituv and Danielle Wilde.

with: Bosmat Alon, Alison…


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abacusParts was an investigation of the introduction of digital space into a performative context, that took place in NYC, 1997-99. The project was conceived, produced, and artistic directed by Romy Achituv and Danielle Wilde.

with: Bosmat Alon, Alison Bradley, Robert Catalano, Matt Dacy, 
Christine Doempke, Charlotte Griffin, Yasmeen Godder, Orit Kruglanski, Merrianne Moore, Sara Shira, Wei Dong, Bruno Vianna and others.

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