1. Vimeo's Top 12 Videos of 2012.
    Shortlisted at the Vimeo Awards 2012.
    Gold at El Ojo de Ibero America 2012

    Tilt shift of the Carnaval party in Rio de Janeiro.
    Soundtrack available here: http://tinyurl.com/6mrzndl

    Made by Keith Loutit and Jarbas Agnelli.
    Captured during Carnaval of 2011.
    Music by Jarbas Agnelli.
    Special thanks to Rede Globo, Liesa and Jodele Larcher.
    Extra thanks to Aguinaldo Rocca (producer) and Nick Graham-Smith (recording engineer).
    Thanks also to Guto Vaz, Marcio Avila and Duda M. for supporting us on the ground.

    keithloutit.com
    adstudio.com.br

    # vimeo.com/37157187 Uploaded 1.8M Plays 547 Comments
  2. Directed by Andrew Thomas Huang
    andrewthomashuang.com

    WINNER at SLAMDANCE 2012 of the Special Jury Prize for Experimental Short

    Facebook facebook.com/AndrewThomasHuang
    facebook.com/Solipsistfilm
    Twitter - twitter.com/Andrew_T_Huang
    Tumblr - andrewthomashuang.tumblr.com/

    Original Soundtrack: itunes.apple.com/us/artist/the-nautilus-diary/id514184687

    Cast Featuring: Mary Elise Hayden, Marissa Merrill & Dustin Edward

    Executive Producers: David Lyons & Andrew Huang
    Producers: Laura Merians & Stephanie Marshall
    Cinematographer: Laura Merians
    Production Designer: Hugh Zeigler
    Costume Designer: Lindsey Mortensen
    Hair & Makeup Designer: Jennifer Cunningham
    Sound Design & Original Score: Andrew Huang

    A Moo Studios & Future You Production

    Copyright 2012 Andrew Huang All Rights Reserved.

    # vimeo.com/37848135 Uploaded 1.8M Plays 572 Comments
  3. Still shocked and excited from last night, it's an honor for us to show you this absolutely MINDBLOWING TITLES made for OFFF by PostPanic.

    Thank you so much to PostPanic, and specially to Mischa Rozema, Ania Markham and Si Scott, simply epic!!!

    Written by Mischa Rozema and British graphic designer, Si Scott, the opening titles reflect their dark thoughts on a possible future. Directed by Mischa and shot on location in Prague, the film guides the viewer through a grim scenario embedded with the names of artists appearing at this year’s OFFF festival. The live action was brought back to Amsterdam for post, primarily carried out by PostPanic’s in-house team of artists but also with the additional help of freelancers and partner companies that we have enjoyed strong creative relationships with over the years. It’s really fair to say that this was a labour of love by a passionate crew of people.

    Says Ania Markham, Executive Producer at PostPanic:
    “The images created by the crew of people working on the titles has been unbelievable, with nationalities represented including Dutch, Czech, English, American, Polish, German, Swedish and Belgian. It’s been a great opportunity for all of us to work together on a non-commercial project we’re passionate about and we’re so proud of the combined effort and final result.”

    DIRECTORS NOTES (Mischa Rozema)

    This project started out as a collaboration between myself and Si Scott. Right from the start, we decided that it should be the darkest thing we could make. I think it just felt natural to the both of us; if we had to nail the future, it would not be a nice place.

    This idea evolved into a clash of times. Inspired by an idea from the late Arthur C. Clarke. He wrote about different historical civilizations meeting in a single point in time. So what happens when civilizations meet? The 'weaker' one gets eaten by the 'stronger'. You only have to look at history to see the destructive power of civilizations.

    So the main underlying idea is: what would happen if the future lands on our doorstep today? Let's take mankind, add perhaps 100 years and then let them show up on our doorstep today. The future would pretty much devour the present. Probably in a matter of, let's say, 7 days… So that's what we're looking at. But every ending also means a new beginning, hence Year Zero.

    There's all kinds of hidden messages in there. Like the virus eating away at reality, buildings and people, even at the viewers brain. It's behaving off course much like a computer virus. And the network of wires represents the future of social networking. I just made it physical and let it 'catch' the city and it's people like a net. All these ideas just serve as inspiration for us to create a future that worked for this concept. They're not meant to be deciphered by the audience. It's still meant to be just a title sequence and not an actual movie.

    Now what makes a good title sequence? Personally, I think it's something that gets you in the mood, warms you up for what you're about to experience, be it a film, tv series or in our case, the OFFF festival. We decided to treat the OFFF festival as a feature film experience. So all we had to do was get the viewer into the right state of mind. Without, of course, being too narrative led. The best title sequences out there are nothing but a random collection of images/scenes that don't tell a lot if you watch them on their own. But edit them together and a new context is created. A context that matters, a feeling that gets the viewer ready for the main event, in our case, the festival.

    To get started, the next thing we did was make a collection of ideas that would scare me and Si. So, anything drawn from our youth, right through to stuff that's inspired us over the years as well as seemingly random compositions that trigger the imagination of the viewer. For example, when we show you the aesthetics of a car explosion, it's carefully constructed. Why a car and not something else? Because an exploding car brings extra content to an otherwise simple aesthetic display of violence. A car doesn't explode by itself so instantly the brain tries to formulate the background behind it. It adds an either political or criminal edge to the violence. To me it felt appropriate because of the sense of protest and rebellion the shot has. And maybe the biggest question; was there someone in the car and if so, who was it? For me, every idea should provoke these kind of questions; from a girl in a prom dress holding a rocket launcher to a riot cop standing in the kitchen. All scenes have a pre and post story to them. In no time you're actually trying to connect these seemingly random scenes and boom; you've just created your own strange context. You now have a feeling, a taste and lots of questions probably. Questions that normally would be answered by watching the actual movie. But since there's no actual movie here we'll leave stranded with, hopefully, an uncomfortable feeling and lots of questions - some might feel unsatisfied and wondering why. Just like a nightmare.

    We also wanted the actual titles to be different this time. Most of the time festival titles are driven by the idea on how to show titles. A mechanism that displays titles in a creative way. We actually thought to bring the festival theme to the foreground and have the titles play a part in it. Incorporate them so they become the actual fiber/texture of the piece itself. Practically I still think it's nice that the viewer has to actively look for the names and not get too comfortable. Even if it means to see it a couple of times which surely is the best we can aim for as a free project ; )

    How about the shoot? Well, prior to Prague we created more than 50 ideas I could play with. This was always the intention. Go out shooting with a tiny crew, acting like we're still in art school and be open for anything that might happen. That's why we shot everything on 2 Canon 5D's (that and having no budget off course). This was a really nice change for me. Normally I prepare commercial shoots to the very last detail and there's a lot more people involved. Savage helped us out big time in Prague. We also had some bad news. Due to his back problems Si Scott had to abandon the project and couldn't join the shoot.

    When we came back from Prague I started editing straight away and soon came to the conclusion we had about 60 vfx shots to work on and no budget and increasingly less time. Remember that this project was a side dish for PostPanic, we had to work on commissioned jobs also. But everybody involved soon fell in love with the project, including STORM Postproduction who are our neighbors (luckily for us).

    In the mean time we received the title list. It had about 70 names on it! That's when I found out that the dynamics I wanted to use would probably not work. Just too many names that would make the piece too long to just show random images. So in the plane towards Prague I thought of bringing in a tiny bit of narrative. Which turned out to be the beginning of the sequence (1st act). I wrote in a lead character that would relate to the viewer.

    The idea was to trick the audience into thinking they're watching some kind of documentary. We basically follow a guy going home. Bit by bit his environment gets stranger and more uncomfortable to watch. Is he living in a war zone? Slowly the background takes over and the piece changes into an urban nightmare. And like a nightmare, the story/edit doesn't always make sense but makes you feel really uncomfortable. I also wanted the viewer to experience the nightmare. That's where the dark matter comes in. Dark matter is what I call the macro shot bits. Flashes that derail your train of thought like there's something eating away at your brain as you try to make sense of the nightmare. I wanted the viewer to go nuts, alongside with the cast. Erase the line between nightmare and reality. The end result is something you won't come across easily on your tv. And is also just another fun way to do titles.

    The sound design and music made by Hecq added a lot to the feel and scale of the film. It clearly divides the 3 acts (1st act: up to execution, 2nd from execution, 3rd final shot) and makes completely different ideas and scenes feel coherent. It also emphasizes the dynamics of the film and brings the much needed pace at the end. It's been great working with Ben. We've been surfing the same wave length throughout the project.

    Finally I want to thank everyone involved for making these titles possible. For creating something out of nothing. For showing so much love for something as dark as this.

    CREDITS

    Directed by Mischa Rozema
    Story by Mischa Rozema & Si Scott
    Production Company: PostPanic
    Executive Producers: Jules Tervoort, Ania Markham
    DoP: Jiri Malek, Mischa Rozema
    Music & Sound Design: Hecq
    Senior Producer: Annejes van Liempd
    Production Assistant: Jacinta Ramaker
    Production Designer: Roland Mylanus
    Editor: Mischa Rozema

    Prague Cast:
    Main Hero: Vladan Bláha
    Grafitti Guy: Tom Malar
    Main Hero Sister: Katerina Galova

    Post-Production: PostPanic
    CG Supervisor: Ivor Goldberg
    VFX Supervisor: Chris Staves
    3D Artists: Jeroen Aerts, Matthijs Joor, Jurriën Boogert, Marnix Reckman, Adam Janeczek
    2D Artist: Erwin van den IJssel
    3D Interns: Cara To, Xander Clerckx
    2D Interns: Mathijs Luijten, Per Westholm
    Compositing: Chris Staves, Ivor Goldberg, Adam Janeczek, Matthijs Joor
    Graphic Designs: Si Scott
    Additional Graffiti Elements: Florian Stumpe
    Matte Painting: Wieger Poutsma
    Additional 3D and Compositing: Storm PostProduction

    Production (Prague) by Savage:
    Executive Producer: Klara Kralickova, Pavla Burgetova Callegari
    Producer: Michaela Berkova
    Production Assistant: Vojta Ruzicka
    Prop master: Jan Fiala
    Location Scout & Management: Petr Bastar, Adam Fuchs
    Location: CREVISTON, a.s.
    Tattoos made by: Wowa tattoo prague

    # vimeo.com/24982650 Uploaded
  4. Check out my new film Adrift: vimeo.com/simonchristen/adrift

    Update: Thanks so much for all your comments! I am reading them all and enjoy them a lot! I am sorry I can't reply to all of you. I am traveling at the moment and only have internet access once in a while. I hope to get to all the questions eventually. Thanks again!

    A collection of time lapses I took around the San Francisco Bay Area roughly shot over the period of one year.

    Please watch in HD :-)

    Find more of my work on my website simonchristen.com

    Follow me on my Facebook page: facebook.com/pages/Simon-Christen-Photography/183499695028114

    or on my flickr account: flickr.com/seemoo

    Music by Nick Cave - Mary's Song from the Soundtrack of "Assassination of Jesse James"

    # vimeo.com/15069551 Uploaded 3.2M Plays 841 Comments
  5. Lesen Sie auf deutsch bitte weiter unten weiter...

    ‘Helvetia’s Dream’ takes you on a nighttime journey to some of the most beautiful spots in the Swiss Alps – from Arosa to Zermatt, including the world famous mountains Matterhorn and Eiger.

    Please pay special attention to the following scenes:
    @0:46 watch the persistent train of a bright meteor above Tijerflue Mountain in Arosa, December 2010, which was visible for about 20 minutes. A slow motion effect is applied for better visibility of the shooting star and its trail of ‘smoke’, which consists of ionized gas left behind as the meteor burns up in the atmosphere.
    @1:14 clouds above Lake Geneva steam up the lens.
    @1:36 on the very left: Climbers step into the unpredictable Eiger Nordwand.
    @1:44 the Milky Way rises above the ‘Donkey’ rock on Pilatus.
    @1:58 snowcats nearby cause the lighting of the summit cross on Fronalpstock Mountain. (Snowcat lights usually spoil time-lapse)
    @2:21 the wind changes the reflection of Säntis Mountain in the Seealpsee.
    @2:35 three settings showing orbits of stars. This is an alternative technique to display the movement of stars by sequentially adding the luminosity of each exposure. The result is basically a long exposure with a large aperture.
    @2:49 the waxing new moon, not full moon, setting over Pilatus.

    For the "making of" information and photo gallery check out the project website helvetiabynight.com.

    ‘Helvetia by Night’ is a time-lapse project about Switzerland by night. Short videos of long nights present you the stunning beauty of the Swiss Alps and show you the magic of a spectacular nighttime sky. Imagine watching a slide-show at fast speed or looking at a flip book. It is photography turning into a movie. Everything in the videos is real and happening out there while most of us are sleeping.

    Some words about me:
    I grew up in Arosa, a small paradise in the mountains of eastern Switzerland located 1800m above sea level. Inspired by such great scenery, photography has become my passion early in life. Since 2005 I work as press photographer for the Swiss press photo agency KEYSTONE in Zurich. Time-lapse photography became a favorite hobby of mine in the year 2011. Besides that I am doing some other private work which can be found here: dellabella.ch

    Have fun watching the time-lapse videos!

    ‘Helvetias Traum’ ist ein nächtlicher Streifzug durch die Schweizer Alpen – von Arosa bis Zermatt. Zu den Höhepunkten gehören die weltbekannten Berge Matterhorn und Eiger.

    Schenken Sie folgenden Szenen besondere Aufmerksamkeit:
    @0:46 Eine Feuerkugel (Meteor) über der Tijerflue in Arosa hinterlässt eine 20 Minuten andauernde Nachleuchtspur. Dabei erzeugt eine durch das Verglühen entstandene katalytische chemische Reaktion Licht. Damit man die Sternschnuppe besser sieht, wurde ein Zeitlupen-Effekt angewendet.
    @1:14 Wolken über dem Genfersee beschlagen das Objektiv.
    @1:36 Ganz links: Bergsteiger auf dem Weg in die unberechenbare Eiger Nordwand.
    @1:44 Die Milchstrasse steigt über dem ‘Esel’ (Pilatus) auf.
    @1:58 Pistenfahrzeuge beleuchten das Gipfelkreuz auf dem Fronalpstock.
    @2:21 Wind verändert die Spiegelung des Säntis im Seealpsee.
    @2:35 Drei Einstellungen mit Sternenbahnen: Diese Darstellung zeigt die scheinbare Bewegung der Sterne, indem die Helligkeit jedes Bildes fortlaufend addiert wird. Das Resultat entspricht im Prinzip einer Langzeitbelichtung mit weit offener Blende.
    @2:49 Der zunehmende Neumond (nicht Vollmond) geht über dem Pilatus unter.

    Eine Fotogalerie und mehr Informationen über das "making of" gibt es auf helvetiabynight.com

    ‚Helvatia by Night‘ ist ein Zeitraffer-Projekt (Time-Lapse) über die Schweiz bei Nacht. Kurzfilme zeigen die atemberaubende Schönheit der Schweizer Bergwelt und einen spektakulären Sternenhimmel, wie Sie vielleicht erst davon geträumt haben. Alles was hier präsentiert wird, ist jedoch absolut real. Schnell aneinander gereihte Fotos werden zu einem Film, wie in einem Daumenkino.

    Einige Worte zu meiner Person:
    Ich bin in Arosa aufgewachsen, einem kleinen Paradies in der Bündner Bergwelt auf 1800 Metern über Meer. Inspiriert durch die beeindruckende Berglandschaft habe ich schon früh die Fotografie als meine Passion entdeckt. Seit 2005 arbeite ich als Pressefotograf bei der Schweizer Bildagentur KEYSTONE in Zürich. Die Time-Lapse Fotografie ist seit 2011 mein Lieblingshobby. Weitere private Arbeiten gibt es auf dellabella.ch

    Viel Vergnügen beim Schauen der Time-Lapse Filme!
    Alessandro Della Bella

    # vimeo.com/52123602 Uploaded 1.3M Plays 202 Comments

mediabook

Raffael Rickfelder

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