1. This Black History Moment presents the rich heritage of Historically Black Colleges & Universities

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  2. This Black History Moment presents legendary poet Maya Angelou.

    # vimeo.com/58998619 Uploaded 5 Plays 0 Comments
  3. Specializing in Real Estate and Business Law, Roger's Law Center, located at 25447 Plymouth Road, in Redford Charter Township, MI 48239, recognizes the celebrates the achievements of African-Americans. To contact Elizabeth Rogers call, 313) 766-4841.

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  4. The son of a slave woman and an unknown white man, "Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey" was born in February of 1818 on Maryland's eastern shore. He spent his early years with his grandparents and with an aunt, seeing his mother only four or five times before her death when he was seven. (All Douglass knew of his father was that he was white.) During this time he was exposed to the degradations of slavery, witnessing firsthand brutal whippings and spending much time cold and hungry. When he was eight he was sent to Baltimore to live with a ship carpenter named Hugh Auld. There he learned to read and first heard the words abolition and abolitionists. "Going to live at Baltimore," Douglass would later say, "laid the foundation, and opened the gateway, to all my subsequent prosperity."

    On January 1, 1836, Douglass made a resolution that he would be free by the end of the year. He planned an escape. But early in April he was jailed after his plan was discovered. Two years later, while living in Baltimore and working at a shipyard, Douglass would finally realize his dream: he fled the city on September 3, 1838. Traveling by train, then steamboat, then train, he arrived in New York City the following day. Several weeks later he had settled in New Bedford, Massachusetts, living with his newlywed bride (whom he met in Baltimore and married in New York) under his new name, Frederick Douglass.

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  5. As the Greenwood District began to emerge in the early 1900s, rigid segregation held sway. Segregation, ironically, gave rise to a nationally renowned black entrepreneurial center. As families arrived and homes sprang up in the Greenwood District, the need for retail and service businesses, schools, and entertainment became pronounced. A class of African American entrepreneurs rose to the occasion, creating a vibrant, vital, self-contained economy that would become Black Wall Street, the talk of the nation.

    In the spring of 1921 underlying social and economic tension in Tulsa sparked the worst race riot in American history. As many as three hundred people lost their lives. Property damage ran into the millions of dollars. Greenwood District, a thirty-five-square-block-area that comprised the city's entire African American community, lay in ruins. Tulsa's African Americans ultimately turned tragedy into triumph. They rebuilt the ravaged Greenwood District, which by 1942 boasted 242 black-owned and black-operated business establishments.

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Black History Moments

Edward Foxworth III

Every year and all-year round, Black History Moments are useful. From Good Corporate Citizen's who sponsor these vignettes to schools and institutions who want to provide various examples of historical contributions, these 60-second portrayals by veteran…


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Every year and all-year round, Black History Moments are useful. From Good Corporate Citizen's who sponsor these vignettes to schools and institutions who want to provide various examples of historical contributions, these 60-second portrayals by veteran broadcast journalist Ed Foxworth are invaluable!

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