1. Tom R. Tyler presented his inaugural lecture as the Macklin Fleming Professor of Law on Monday, Dec. 10, 2012, at Yale Law School. Professor Tyler’s lecture was titled “Legitimacy in Everyday Law.”
    “Studies of public legitimacy suggest that while legality plays a role in shaping public legitimacy, other factors are more important, in particular, whether people believe legal authorities use fair procedures when they create and implement laws,” said Professor Tyler. “This talk makes the case for the value of increasing our focus on public legitimacy and outlines how heightening attention to this issue would change legal scholarship.”

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  2. Daniel Markovits ’00 presented his inaugural lecture as the Guido Calabresi Professor of Law on April 9, 2012, at Yale Law School. The lecture, titled “Market Solidarity,” lays out a new general theory of economic markets, which displays market relations as a central pillar (as important as politics and the state) supporting order and stability in open, cosmopolitan societies.

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  3. Richard Brooks joined the Yale Law School faculty in 2003 as an Associate Professor of Law. His expertise is in contracts, organizations, culture, and law and economics.He previously taught at Northwestern University School of Law and in Cornell University’s Department of Policy Analysis and Management. He has served as a visiting researcher at the Center in Law, Economics and Organization at the University of Southern California Law School; on an advisory committee to the Social, Behavioral and Economics Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation; and as a research specialist in the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice.

    He holds a B.A. from Cornell, an M.A. and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley, and a J.D. from the University of Chicago.

    The Leighton Homer Surbeck Professorship was established by Margaret Surbeck in 2000 to honor the memory of her husband Homer Surbeck ’27, founding member of the law firm of Hughes, Hubbard & Reed, and to reflect Homer Surbeck's lifelong commitment to the highest ideals of the legal profession.

    This inaugural lecture was delivered by Professor Brooks on September 19, 2011, at Yale Law School.

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  4. Michael J. Wishnie ’93, Deputy Dean for Experiential Learning and director of Yale Law School's Legal Services Organization, presented his inaugural lecture as the William O. Douglas Clinical Professor of Law on April 8, 2013. The title of his lecture was “Resistance and Regeneration.”
    Professor Wishnie said of his lecture: “In a world of scarce resources for poor and subordinated households and communities, what sort of legal advocacy is most likely to aid individuals and advance social and economic justice in the United States? If one believes that enduring reform is more likely to result from collective action than elite interventions, then what sort of law practice can best serve social movements? And how can such a practice be learned and taught? These questions have engaged me for years. In this talk, I hope to share some reflections on lawyering for social change with low-wage workers, undocumented immigrants, disabled veterans, alleged terrorists, and law students.”

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Inaugural Lectures

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