1. # vimeo.com/43686689 Uploaded 3 Plays 0 Comments
  2. This webinar is a presentation about the National Science Foundation's Arctic Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability (SEES) program.

    # vimeo.com/43686690 Uploaded 3 Plays 0 Comments
  3. Tuesday, March 23, 2010

    Jeremy Mathis, Professor, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks

    Since the Industrial Revolution approximately 1/3 of all human CO2 emissions have been absorbed by the ocean. While this process has mitigated global temperature increases it has had a profound effect on the chemistry of the surface ocean, making the water more acidic. This phenomenon is exacerbated in the cold, highly productive waters in the continental shelf seas surrounding Alaska. Recent observations have shown that the bottom waters over the shelves of the Chukchi and Bering Seas, as well has the Gulf of Alaska become undersaturated with respect to aragonite in late summer and fall. These undersaturated waters could be corrosive to shell building organisms such as clams, oysters, and crabs. Here, the controls and seasonal distribution of ocean acidification around Alaska will be discussed in the context of the import commercial fisheries.

    Presentation/Slides: ine.uaf.edu/accap/documents/2010_03_OceanAcidification_Mathis.pdf

    # vimeo.com/31989085 Uploaded 26 Plays 0 Comments
  4. Tuesday, May 4, 2010

    Katey Walter Anthony, Assistant Professor, Water & Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas released from millions of lakes in the Arctic. The largest methane emissions come from lakes where organic-rich permafrost is thawing. Permafrost organic matter released into the bottoms of lakes fuels methane production, and methane escapes lakes largely by bubbling. Given the huge quantity of organic carbon in permafrost (>1500 Gt C, which is more than twice the atmospheric C content), and projections of permafrost warming and thawing, the fate of carbon and greenhouse gas release is important for understanding climate change feedbacks.

    Presentation/Slides: ine.uaf.edu/accap/documents/2010_5_MethaneLakes_WalterAnthony.pdf

    # vimeo.com/31988080 Uploaded 165 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Tuesday, June 15, 2010

    Hajo Eicken, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks; Gary Hufford, National Weather Service, Alaska Region; Vera Metcalf, Eskimo Walrus Commission, Kawerak, Inc.

    The Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook (SIWO), an activity of the SEARCH Sea Ice Outlook, is a new resource for Alaska Native subsistence hunters, coastal communities, and others interested in sea ice and walrus. The SIWO is updated weekly with information on sea ice conditions relevant to walrus in the Northern Bering Sea and southern Chukchi Sea regions of Alaska. SIWO reports include: an assessment of current ice conditions relevant to distribution and access of walrus; a 10-day outlook of wind conditions; up-to-date satellite imagery for the Bering Strait and St. Lawrence Island; written observations of ice development from Alaska Native hunters, sea-ice experts, or NOAA and university researchers; and additional comments provided by local experts and other contributors. Please join us to learn how the SIWO is created, how to contribute to the outlook, and for discussion about how it can serve your sea ice information needs and be most useful to you.

    Presentation/Slides: ine.uaf.edu/accap/documents/2010_6_SIWO_Eicken.pdf

    # vimeo.com/31986883 Uploaded 33 Plays 0 Comments

ACCAP Alaska Climate Webinars

SNAP + ACCAP Plus

ACCAP state-wide climate webinars are designed to promote dialogue between scientists and people in government, land and resource management, industry and individual residents who need information related to climate change in Alaska to make well informed…


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ACCAP state-wide climate webinars are designed to promote dialogue between scientists and people in government, land and resource management, industry and individual residents who need information related to climate change in Alaska to make well informed decisions. Our goal is to create a forum for discussion and information exchange of the current state of knowledge about specific aspects of climate change in Alaska that is accessible to people state-wide and identifies existing information gaps and how best to fill them. Each webinar will start with 20-30 minutes of presentation followed by discussion and questions from participants.

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