1. This talk was hosted by the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training at Flinders University, on 14 February 2013.

    SUMMARY
    With the majority of Australia’s population living along the coast, the management of coastal groundwater resources is becoming ever more important.

    Recent research of groundwater systems at the land–ocean interface has clearly shown the importance of acknowledging the connectivity between onshore and offshore parts of coastal aquifers. This information is necessary to understand and predict the movement of groundwater and its dissolved solutes across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Coastal aquifer systems do not terminate at the coastline, and nor is the coastline fixed in time. Past changes of sea level and coastline migration still have an influence on the groundwater salinity distribution today.

    This presentation reviews the current state of the science, and explains the need for more research on the offshore parts of aquifers, which may contain significant volumes of exploitable groundwater.

    ABOUT VINCENT
    Vincent Post is a groundwater hydrologist who currently holds a lecturership at Flinders University in Adelaide. He is a chief investigator within program 2 of the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training.

    Vincent obtained his PhD from the VU University in Amsterdam in 2004, where his thesis focused on the paleohydrological evolution of coastal aquifers in the Netherlands on geological timescales. He also works as an editor for Hydrogeology Journal.

    # vimeo.com/62680539 Uploaded 515 Plays 0 Comments
  2. Dr Jack Sharpe speaks at the Australian National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training at Flinders University in early 2013.

    John M. (Jack) Sharp, Jr. is Dave P. Carlton Professor of Geology at The University of Texas at Austin. He was the President of the Geological Society of America for the period of June 2007-June 2008.

    He received a B. Geol. E. with Distinction from the University of Minnesota in 1967, a M.S in Geology from Midwestern State University, and a PhD. in Geology from the University of Illinois in 1974. After teaching at the University of Missouri from 1974 to 1982, he joined the University of Texas faculty, where he was Gulf Foundation Centennial Professor of Geology and C. E. Yager Professor of Geology from 1989 to 1993, Centennial Professor of Geology from 1993 to 2002, and Dave P. Carlton Professor from 2002 on.

    His research deals with flow in fractured rocks, the hydrology of arid zones, and the effects of urbanization. He is particularly concerned with the hydrogeology of sedimentary basins, and with ore deposit formation.

    Sharp has published over 280 journal articles and abstracts, and over 10 monographs/book chapters, as well as a large number of conference presentations and book reviews. He was from 1995 to 2002 the editor of Environmental and Engineering Geoscience.

    Jack Sharp received the President’s Award from the International Association of Hydrogeologists in 2012 and the C.V. Theis Award from the American Institute of Hydrology in 1996.

    # vimeo.com/62679945 Uploaded 111 Plays 0 Comments
  3. Cliff covers the management issues of two of the world’s largest groundwater problems. He shows how simple models and insighful approaches to analysis can provide clear and robust answers to important questions about aquifer functioning and water-resource management.

    This philosophy was applied to the study of two transboundary aquifer systems – the Bengal Aquifer System (BAS) of Bangladesh and India, and the Nubian Aquifer System (NAS) of Chad, Egypt, Libya and Sudan.
    For BAS, where dissolved arsenic is a major contamination problem, simple modelling allowed identification of a management approach that could supply a sustainable arsenic-free groundwater supply.

    For NAS, the world’s largest non-renewable water resource, the development of a simple model is a key step in providing a technical basis for international discussion concerning sharing and management.

    Dr Clifford Voss is a senior scientist in the hydrological research program of the US Geological Survey. He has worked on hydrogeological systems for more than 30 years, in field studies, research, project management, and implementation. This presentation was given to the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training at Flinders University in South Australia, on 16 August 2012.

    NOTE: The filming of this video unfortunately cuts out a few minutes before the end of the talk.

    # vimeo.com/51041793 Uploaded 389 Plays 0 Comments
  4. In this video, leading freshwater expert Steve Gorelick discusses changes in human and natural systems and how these can drive threats to freshwater resources in the 21st century.

    An overarching challenge will be to create freshwater systems that can sustain human wellbeing and natural ecosystems in the presence of rapid environmental and socioeconomic change. Solutions are likely to rely on modern engineering and information technologies, combined with effective planning, policies and institutions.

    Steve Gorelick is the Cyrus F. Tolman Professor in the Department of Environmental Earth System Science and a Senior Fellow in the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University in California. This presentation was given to the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training, at Flinders University in South Australia, on 14 August 2012.

    NOTE: The filming of this video unfortunately cuts out a few minutes before the end of the talk.

    # vimeo.com/51039600 Uploaded 170 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Over the last ten years, the quantification of the connectivity of heterogeneous porous aquifers has become a very active field of research. In this presentation, Dr Phillippe Renard provides an overview of existing static and connectivity metrics as well as their properties, and tools to constrain geostatistical models by connectivity metrics. He discusses the known relationships between the various concepts and how those tools could be used more widely in applied hydrogeology.

    Dr Philippe Renard is Director of Research for the Stochastic Hydrogeology Group at the Centre for Hydrogeology and Geothermics, at the University of Neuchatel, Switzerland. This presentation was given to the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training, at Flinders University in South Australia, on 8 August 2012.

    NOTE: The filming of this video unfortunately cuts out a few minutes before the end of the talk.

    # vimeo.com/51038092 Uploaded 22 Plays 0 Comments

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