1. A fan made montage.

    # vimeo.com/62920484 Uploaded 3 Plays 0 Comments
  2. Double-exposures in motion.

    -
    One Screen Title and End Credit Sequences 2016 – Winner
    SXSW Excellence in Title Design 2014 – Finalist
    Desktop Magazine's Create Design Award for Motion 2013 – Winner
    Australian Production Design Guild Award for Title Design 2013 – Winner
    -

    Breeder was invited back to create the opening titles for Analogue/Digital, so once again, we threw ourselves into the project and didn't hold back. This year, we developed an ambitious aesthetic based upon the idea of double exposure, inspired by Alabaster's amazing track and the conference's program design. We worked around the theme of binary, juxtaposing the urban sprawl and nature, black and white, flight and fall, and unification and disintegration. It was a labour of love and we couldn't be prouder with the end result.

    BREAKDOWN VIDEO: vimeo.com/breeder/adbne2013-breakdown

    analoguedigital.com.au
    studiobreeder.com
    iamalabaster.bandcamp.com

    Credits
    Creative Direction: Joyce Ho
    Producer: Adam Sebastian West
    Cinematography: Chris Morris, Alex Gee, Adam Sebastian West
    Editing: Alex Gee
    Design Lead: Joyce Ho
    Design: Alex Gee, Timothy Lovett, Jai Mitchell
    Compositing: Chris Morris
    Animation: Alex Gee, Joyce Ho, Grayson Huddart

    Starring: Abagail Pirie, Anthony Trojman

    Sound by ALABASTER

    # vimeo.com/66487989 Uploaded 241K Plays 172 Comments
  3. August 15, 2017 is the 38th Anniversary of the U.S. premiere of Apocalypse Now, Francis Ford Coppola's adaptation of Joseph Conrad's novella, Heart of Darkness.

    Joseph Conrad's story is about a boat captain named Marlow who travels along a river deep into "the heart of an immense darkness" in order to find a man named Kurtz. One of the many themes of Heart of Darkness is the idea that a person can lose their mind the further they travel away from civilization into the unknown.

    This theme is paralleled in Apocalypse Now and by Coppola's own journey in completing his most personal film. The documentary, Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse is a compilation of Eleanor Coppola's interviews, on-the-set footage and secret audio recordings of her husband at his most exposed moments. Coppola's many struggles included an unfinished script, Marlon Brando showing up overweight, typhoons destroying entire sets and Martin Sheen having a heart attack during production.

    The above cut is a mix of Orson Welles' reading of Heart of Darkness, Apocalypse Now and the documentary Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse.

    # vimeo.com/45985040 Uploaded 97.1K Plays 69 Comments
  4. Find more of my work here: mikeolbinski.com

    Also follow me on Instragram for storm photos and whatnot - instagram.com/mikeolbinski

    Still print of this storm can be found here if interested: gallery.mikeolbinski.com/stormchasing/h6015e87e#h6015e87e

    Technical deets: Canon 5D2, Rokinon 14mm 2.8...first three clips were at 1-second intervals = 880ish photos, the last sequence was around 90, 5-second exposures

    Music by Kevin MacLeod - incompetech.com/
    -------------

    It took four years but I finally got it.

    A rotating supercell. And not just a rotating supercell, but one with insane structure and amazing movement.

    I've been visiting the Central Plains since 2010. Usually it's just for a day, or three, or two...but it took until the fourth attempt to actually find what I'd been looking for. And boy did we find it.

    No, there was no tornado. But that's not really what I was after. I'm from Arizona. We don't get structure like this. Clouds that rotate and look like alien spacecraft hanging over the Earth.

    We chased this storm from the wrong side (north) and it took us going through hail and torrential rains to burst through on the south side. And when we did...this monster cloud was hanging over Texas and rotating like something out of Close Encounters.

    The timelapse was shot on a Canon 5D Mark II with a Rokinon 14mm 2.8 lens. It's broken up into four parts. The first section ends because it started pouring on us. We should have been further south when we started filming but you never know how long these things will last, so I started the timelapse as soon as I could.

    One thing to note early on in the first part is the way the rain is coming down on the right and actually being sucked back into the rotation. Amazing.

    A few miles south is where part two picks up. And I didn't realize how fast it was moving south, so part three is just me panning the camera to the left. During that third part you can see dust along the cornfield being pulled into the storm as well...part of the strong inflow.

    The final part is when the storm had started dying out and we shot lightning as it passed over us.

    Between the third and fourth portions we drove through Booker, Texas where tornado sirens were going off...it was creepy as all heck. And intense.

    I hope you enjoy this. Once thing I've learned about timelapsing is that I always wish it would be longer or wouldn't end. I wish I had been south and been able to record this storm come at me for 45 minutes.

    But I love it the way it is. I wasn't ever certain I'd see structure like this even though it's been such a goal of mine. But we did it.

    And by we, I mean myself and my buddy Andy Hoeland, who knows his crap and got us into position so we could chase this storm. Without him along I don't know if I get this timelapse.

    # vimeo.com/67995158 Uploaded 2.8M Plays 265 Comments
  5. # vimeo.com/72377770 Uploaded 411K Plays 138 Comments

Dado Saboya

Eduardo Saboya

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