1. Tin Sheds Gallery, 10 August–8 September, 2012
    148 City Rd, Darlington NSW 2006, Sydney

    Featured Installations:
    ANIM.OS
    Black Spring
    Breathe
    The Creators
    Dragon
    Metastasis
    particles rev.
    Pattern Symbiosis
    Untitled (32465…)

    Digital Interdisciplinations - Prototypes: Prosthetics, Parasite

    Digital Interdisciplinations recognises the transition that has occurred from our initial collective amazement with digital technology towards a more nuanced fascination with the potential for new relationships it generates. The exhibition focuses on the delicacies of these relationships – are these symbiotic, prosthetic or parasitic? What happens in a digitally enhanced responsive environment, when mutual dependencies develop on a temporal individual basis? What happens when, as David Rokeby suggests, the interactive part becomes as much a material for designing as matter itself?

    The exhibition is informed by these human concerns. Its approach to the digital (animation, advanced geometries, fabrication and interactivity) springs from more messy cultural and intersocial concerns, embedding desire, memory, hunt, loss, curiosity, imagination, identity and recognition, within the works and making these emotional qualities the drivers of exhibition projects that become prototypes of interactions and interdisciplinations.

    Digital Interdisciplinations exists in a digital crossroads, bridging between design realms that develop in and out of the digital – it recognizes that digital techniques, software and computation have become a joint language between disciplines. The project pursues speculative ideas, concepts, processes, techniques, and technologies that develop at the boundary of art, architecture and interactive media art.

    Breathe (Lucian Gormley, Hugo Ragget, Sean Bryen)

    Mutation allows for spontaneous change in the structure of a cell. When a cell divides, it makes a copy of its DNA, though this is not always a perfect copy. This small difference in the DNA sequence is a mutation, allowing cells to adapt and evolve. Aunt omit, a mint out, atom unit. Nonsensical gibberish this may be, but these anagrams share the principle of the most primitive form of mutation found in our DNA. The slightest deviation from the original assemblage of letters allows for a multitude of variations of mutation, all with vastly different readable meanings.

    If we begin to think of architecture as a sequence of mutations changing in order to achieve a desired result, our process is cumbersome and our product is final. If however, we were to consider architecture as both responsive and unpredictable then it may be possible to develop new and more dynamic living arrangements. Mutating out of our own familiar living patterns, our built environment could start to interact with more intelligence and adaptability.

    This ability to evolve rapidly would allow a variety of new types of spaces to emerge. Rather than specify one solution to a problem, embedded intelligence in architecture could begin to resolve and predict issues in real time and stimulate changes that the definitive nature of our current built form disregards.

    The project is an iteration of ‘Biosynthetics’, which challenged the static nature of architecture by proposing a living structure capable of human interaction and adaptability. Microprocessors, sensors and motor actuators were embedded into kinetic geometries derived from cell mutations, allowing various behavioural reactions to the physical presence of the visitor.

    # vimeo.com/64280673 Uploaded 236 Plays 0 Comments
  2. biome presents:
    Digital Interdisciplinations - Prototypes: Prosthetics, Parasites

    Tin Sheds Gallery, 10 August–8 September, 2012
    148 City Rd, Darlington NSW 2006, Sydney

    Featured Installations:
    ANIM.OS
    Black Spring
    Breathe
    The Creators
    Dragon
    Metastasis
    particles rev.
    Pattern Symbiosis
    Untitled (32465…)

    Digital Interdisciplinations - Prototypes: Prosthetics, Parasite

    Digital Interdisciplinations recognises the transition that has occurred from our initial collective amazement with digital technology towards a more nuanced fascination with the potential for new relationships it generates. The exhibition focuses on the delicacies of these relationships – are these symbiotic, prosthetic or parasitic? What happens in a digitally enhanced responsive environment, when mutual dependencies develop on a temporal individual basis? What happens when, as David Rokeby suggests, the interactive part becomes as much a material for designing as matter itself?

    The exhibition is informed by these human concerns. Its approach to the digital (animation, advanced geometries, fabrication and interactivity) springs from more messy cultural and intersocial concerns, embedding desire, memory, hunt, loss, curiosity, imagination, identity and recognition, within the works and making these emotional qualities the drivers of exhibition projects that become prototypes of interactions and interdisciplinations.

    Digital Interdisciplinations exists in a digital crossroads, bridging between design realms that develop in and out of the digital – it recognizes that digital techniques, software and computation have become a joint language between disciplines. The project pursues speculative ideas, concepts, processes, techniques, and technologies that develop at the boundary of art, architecture and interactive media art.

    Pattern Symbiosis, Kate Dunn and Graham Clarkson

    Pattern Symbiosis is a conceptual and visual dialogue between artist Kate Dunn and artist / industrial designer, Graham Clarkson. The work reflects and disseminates the outcomes of climate change research from contemporary art, design and scientific perspectives.

    Addressing the analogue and digital interface of contemporary fabrication, this dialogue acts as a commentary on human interaction with the environment in an age of digitization and technology. This collaboration looks at the hidden aspects of the impact of human interaction. Within the binary code of the root system is the specific climate change data pertaining to the decimation of the Cumberland Plain Woodlands.

    The Cumberland Plain is the region Sydney inhabits, only 6% of the original Cumberland plain woodlands remain. Cleared due to endless urban expansion and suffering under the impacts of climate change many species are either extinct or close to extinction.

    # vimeo.com/64284223 Uploaded 192 Plays 0 Comments
  3. biome presents:
    Digital Interdisciplinations - Prototypes: Prosthetics, Parasites

    Tin Sheds Gallery, 10 August–8 September, 2012
    148 City Rd, Darlington NSW 2006, Sydney

    Featured Installations:
    ANIM.OS
    Black Spring
    Breathe
    The Creators
    Dragon
    Metastasis
    particles rev.
    Pattern Symbiosis
    Untitled (32465…)

    Digital Interdisciplinations - Prototypes: Prosthetics, Parasite

    Digital Interdisciplinations recognises the transition that has occurred from our initial collective amazement with digital technology towards a more nuanced fascination with the potential for new relationships it generates. The exhibition focuses on the delicacies of these relationships – are these symbiotic, prosthetic or parasitic? What happens in a digitally enhanced responsive environment, when mutual dependencies develop on a temporal individual basis? What happens when, as David Rokeby suggests, the interactive part becomes as much a material for designing as matter itself?

    The exhibition is informed by these human concerns. Its approach to the digital (animation, advanced geometries, fabrication and interactivity) springs from more messy cultural and intersocial concerns, embedding desire, memory, hunt, loss, curiosity, imagination, identity and recognition, within the works and making these emotional qualities the drivers of exhibition projects that become prototypes of interactions and interdisciplinations.

    Digital Interdisciplinations exists in a digital crossroads, bridging between design realms that develop in and out of the digital – it recognizes that digital techniques, software and computation have become a joint language between disciplines. The project pursues speculative ideas, concepts, processes, techniques, and technologies that develop at the boundary of art, architecture and interactive media art.

    The Creators (Constanza Casas, Mark C Mitchell, Pieter Steyaert)
    The Creators explores the boundaries of viewer participation through both direct and indirect participation as an analogy to concepts of causality and responsibility.

    By approaching the installation, the viewer indirectly influences the system by sound and movement. Through direct contact, the manipulation becomes a choice—a recognised responsibility. The viewer, inadvertently or purposefully, is always a creator.

    By exploring these themes of participation, causality and consigned responsibility, the work is a portal, reflecting the chaos of life and our burden of choice through ripples invoked by viewer interaction. In this way, the work has a goal of silently activating the viewer, heightening their conscious experience of their role in this world.

    # vimeo.com/64286048 Uploaded 211 Plays 0 Comments
  4. biome presents:
    Digital Interdisciplinations - Prototypes: Prosthetics, Parasites

    Tin Sheds Gallery, 10 August–8 September, 2012
    148 City Rd, Darlington NSW 2006, Sydney

    Featured Installations:
    ANIM.OS, Black Spring, Breathe, The Creators, Dragon, Metastasis, particles rev.
    Pattern Symbiosis, Untitled (32465…)

    Digital Interdisciplinations - Prototypes: Prosthetics, Parasite

    Digital Interdisciplinations recognises the transition that has occurred from our initial collective amazement with digital technology towards a more nuanced fascination with the potential for new relationships it generates. The exhibition focuses on the delicacies of these relationships – are these symbiotic, prosthetic or parasitic? What happens in a digitally enhanced responsive environment, when mutual dependencies develop on a temporal individual basis? What happens when, as David Rokeby suggests, the interactive part becomes as much a material for designing as matter itself?

    The exhibition is informed by these human concerns. Its approach to the digital (animation, advanced geometries, fabrication and interactivity) springs from more messy cultural and intersocial concerns, embedding desire, memory, hunt, loss, curiosity, imagination, identity and recognition, within the works and making these emotional qualities the drivers of exhibition projects that become prototypes of interactions and interdisciplinations.

    Digital Interdisciplinations exists in a digital crossroads, bridging between design realms that develop in and out of the digital – it recognizes that digital techniques, software and computation have become a joint language between disciplines. The project pursues speculative ideas, concepts, processes, techniques, and technologies that develop at the boundary of art, architecture and interactive media art.
    Untitled (32465…), James Ducker (Google API), Tony Ho, Steven Janssen, Guido Maciocci, Gabriele Ulacco

    (32465…) is an exploration of the capabilities of a machine that can draw. How might the machine interpret images to draw something valuable and achieve an understanding of what it has drawn?

    Through a series of semi-autonomous acts, a machine seeks to address this concern. The machine has access to a constantly expanding online database of images of paintings, drawings, sculptures, historic and religious artefacts, photographs and manuscripts, all made publicly available through the Google Art Project (currently 32465 images).

    The machine selects an image from the database to interpret. Using a series of algorithms the machine seeks patterns within the work that it can mimic and reproduce using its own drawing apparatus and logic. It executes a physical drawing of its interpretation and upon completion interrogates what it has drawn. Exploiting Google Image Search algorithms, the machine attempts to find similarity between its production and online images, constructing meaning through association. The first n results from the Google Image search are downloaded, processed, and executed by the drawing apparatus to record the machine’s understanding of its own work.

    Act 1: Interpret work from Google Art Project.

    1a: Select a work.
    1b: Interpret using a pixel to vector algorithm.
    1c: Convert to machine language.
    1d: Output analog graphic interpretation.

    Act 2: Interpret own drawing using Google Image Search.

    2a: Submit drawing to google image search.
    2b: Select the first n results.
    2c: Interpret using a pixel to vector algorithm.
    2d: Convert to machine language.
    2e: Output analog graphic interpretation.

    # vimeo.com/64287731 Uploaded 271 Plays 0 Comments
  5. biome presents:
    Digital Interdisciplinations - Prototypes: Prosthetics, Parasites

    Tin Sheds Gallery, 10 August–8 September, 2012
    148 City Rd, Darlington NSW 2006, Sydney

    Digital Interdisciplinations recognises the transition that has occurred from our initial collective amazement with digital technology towards a more nuanced fascination with the potential for new relationships it generates. The exhibition focuses on the delicacies of these relationships – are these symbiotic, prosthetic or parasitic? What happens in a digitally enhanced responsive environment, when mutual dependencies develop on a temporal individual basis? What happens when, as David Rokeby suggests, the interactive part becomes as much a material for designing as matter itself?

    The exhibition is informed by these human concerns. Its approach to the digital (animation, advanced geometries, fabrication and interactivity) springs from more messy cultural and intersocial concerns, embedding desire, memory, hunt, loss, curiosity, imagination, identity and recognition, within the works and making these emotional qualities the drivers of exhibition projects that become prototypes of interactions and interdisciplinations.

    Digital Interdisciplinations exists in a digital crossroads, bridging between design realms that develop in and out of the digital – it recognizes that digital techniques, software and computation have become a joint language between disciplines. The project pursues speculative ideas, concepts, processes, techniques, and technologies that develop at the boundary of art, architecture and interactive media art.

    Metastasis (Martin Tomitsch, Eduardo Barata,Luke Hespanhol, Philip Peltz)

    Metastasis is an interactive light installation discussing the conflict between personal indulgence and social responsibility utilising the environmental impact of energy consumption as a conceptual vehicle to express such dichotomy. Pleasure and guilt, beauty and shame are continuously interplayed on a immersive tapestry of entangling light challenging the audience’s role in the experience and questioning its very own raison d’être.

    The installation is conceived as a dark room inhabited by a parasitical organism embedded into the gallery building. The parasite takes the shape of three squared cauldrons of light energy lined up like glowing windows across one of the walls of the room. The cauldrons do nothing and although some movement can be softly perceived at their surface, it has ultimately no coherence or follows any pattern. The cauldrons stand as sheer beacons of purposeless and wasteful energy spending, burning non-stop for no apparent reason. In the middle of the room, an array of 10 colourful spotlights hangs from the roof, pointing to different directions across the walls of the room.

    As the cauldrons release their energy, a pattern of growing light cells emerge off them and onto the room walls in the form of projected animation, crawling through the surfaces as if wishing to take the entire room over. Those are “waste cells”—units of bad social habits spreading around uncontrollably like cancer and fed by the audience’s inaction. The extension of their spread is proportional to the cauldrons current energy consumption. If consumption increases, the replicating cells spread further; if it gets reduced, the cancer of waste recedes back to the cauldrons. Likewise, when it spreads further enough to reach the spotlights, those get turned on, one by one, illustrating their contamination by light; when the “waste cells” recede back, wasteful consumption is being tamed and the spotlights go off. When the cauldrons are functioning at full glow the whole room is therefore covered by the intricate, delicately beautiful tissue of light cells and all the spotlights are on, projecting colourful dots around the room. Beauty and aesthetic pleasure born out of sheer waste of resources.

    It takes human effort and participation to heal this social cancer and control the spread of wasteful consumption and strike a healthy balance between pleasure and guilty, comfort and self-imposed deprivation, physical/emotional indulgence and ethically oriented behaviour. Such conflicts are represented by the mechanisms of interaction between audience and artwork. When individuals step into the room, their shadows are casted over the cauldrons. Their projected silhouette, being dark, turns screen pixels off and, in consequence, brings the level of consumption down. That, in turn, causes the previously expanding “waste cells” to recede back to their sources, making the room grow less and less lit until eventually it ends up in almost total darkness. By engaging with the installation, the audience therefore also contributes to its demise. Just like natural resources, its utilisation and the indulgence on its cherished benefits—here crystallised as aesthetic beauty—inevitably leads to its exhaustion.

    # vimeo.com/64285466 Uploaded 187 Plays 0 Comments

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