1. In the 1970s biologists did reconnaissance of offshore islands throughout Alaska's coastal areas to determine abundance and distribution of marine mammals and birds to help select lands for new refuges, parks, and monuments that would be created under the 1980 Alaska Lands Act. After passage of the Alaska Lands Act in 1980, USFWS biologist Edgar Bailey and volunteer Nina Faust continued this work by surveying a 200-mile section of the Alaska Peninsula coast from Jute Bay to Amber Bay, checking almost all the bays and nearly all of the islands along the way. Their arduous trip used a 16-foot inflatable Avon Sportboat with two 25-hp outboard motors. With no communications except an Emergency Locator Beacon (ELT), they were dropped off in Island Bay inside Jute Bay on June 18th and spent the next 28 days surveying this rugged, windy area. Today, USFWS does not let personnel do surveys in this fashion as it is considered too dangerous.

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  2. In the 1970s biologists did reconnaissance of offshore islands throughout Alaska's coastal areas to determine abundance and distribution of marine mammals and birds to help select lands for new refuges, parks, and monuments that would be created under the 1980 Alaska Lands Act. In 1979, USFWS biologist Edgar Bailey and volunteer Nina Faust undertook a 400 mile survey along the coast of the Alaska Peninsula from Mitrofania Island to Sutwik Island, checking almost all the bays and nearly all of the islands along the way. Their arduous trip used a 16-foot inflatable Avon Sportboat with two 25-hp outboard motors. With no communications except a CB radio that they discovered was not much use and an Emergency Locator Beacon (ELT), they were dropped off on Mitrofania on July 4 spent the next 25 days surveying this rugged, windy area. Today, USFWS does not let personnel do surveys in this fashion as it is considered too dangerous.

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  3. In 1976 a joint reconnaissance team surveyed from Seldovia to Seward along the southern coast of the Kenai Peninsula documenting the abundance and distribution of marine birds and mammals. Their purpose was to determine which islands and coastal lands should be part of new refuges, parks, and monuments. This effort selected the lands along this coast that are now part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge and the Kenai Fjords National Park.

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  4. In 1980, the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act created the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge which now has 3.4 million acres, 2500 islands, rocks, and reefs, and some 40 million birds spread throughout Alaska's 47,300 miles of coastline. This slide program also presents slides of Izembek National Wildlife Refuge and some other important Alaskan coastal bird areas.

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  5. Augustine Island, roughly 70 miles west of Homer, Alaska, is an active volcanic island which most recently erupted in 2006. In 1984, Edgar Bailey and Nina Faust flew to the island

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Alaska Wilderness Areas

Nina Faust Plus

Over many years, Edgar Bailey and I explored over a thousand miles of Alaskan and Canadian rivers for recreation. We also surveyed hundreds of miles of Alaska's wilderness coast and islands for the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge.

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