1. WINNER OF THE VIMEO AWARDS 2012 in CATEGORY MOTION GRAPHICS! Thanks so much for voting everyone! Watch a short 1 min. making of here, which was shown at the awards: vimeo.com/44046584

    Graduation project 2011
    Designed as a possible title sequence for a fictitious documentary, this film shows a history of the title sequence in a nutshell. The sequence includes all the names of title designers who had a revolutionary impact on the history and evolution of the title sequence. The names of the title designers all refer to specific characteristics of the revolutionary titles that they designed.
    This film refers to elements such as the cut and shifted characters of Saul Bass' Psycho title, the colored circles of Maurice Binder's design for Dr. No and the contemporary designs of Kyle Cooper and Danny Yount.

    This title sequence refers to the following designers and their titles:
    Georges Méliès - Un Voyage Dans La Lune, Saul Bass - Psycho, Maurice Binder - Dr. No, Stephen Frankfurt - To Kill A Mockingbird, Pablo Ferro - Dr. Strangelove, Richard Greenberg - Alien, Kyle Cooper - Seven, Danny Yount - Kiss Kiss Bang Bang / Sherlock Holmes

    CREDITS

    Direction and Animation: Jurjen Versteeg / synple.nl
    Music and sound design: Lea Jurida / jurida.com

    Many thanks to all the people who helped me realizing this project!

    For some more info on the concept and the production process, please check out the interview on 'Forget the Film, Watch The Titles': http://bit.ly/pzvXXE

    Watch a short 1min. making of here: vimeo.com/44046584

    # vimeo.com/26278283 Uploaded 614K Plays 323 Comments
  2. Still shocked and excited from last night, it's an honor for us to show you this absolutely MINDBLOWING TITLES made for OFFF by PostPanic.

    Thank you so much to PostPanic, and specially to Mischa Rozema, Ania Markham and Si Scott, simply epic!!!

    Written by Mischa Rozema and British graphic designer, Si Scott, the opening titles reflect their dark thoughts on a possible future. Directed by Mischa and shot on location in Prague, the film guides the viewer through a grim scenario embedded with the names of artists appearing at this year’s OFFF festival. The live action was brought back to Amsterdam for post, primarily carried out by PostPanic’s in-house team of artists but also with the additional help of freelancers and partner companies that we have enjoyed strong creative relationships with over the years. It’s really fair to say that this was a labour of love by a passionate crew of people.

    Says Ania Markham, Executive Producer at PostPanic:
    “The images created by the crew of people working on the titles has been unbelievable, with nationalities represented including Dutch, Czech, English, American, Polish, German, Swedish and Belgian. It’s been a great opportunity for all of us to work together on a non-commercial project we’re passionate about and we’re so proud of the combined effort and final result.”

    DIRECTORS NOTES (Mischa Rozema)

    This project started out as a collaboration between myself and Si Scott. Right from the start, we decided that it should be the darkest thing we could make. I think it just felt natural to the both of us; if we had to nail the future, it would not be a nice place.

    This idea evolved into a clash of times. Inspired by an idea from the late Arthur C. Clarke. He wrote about different historical civilizations meeting in a single point in time. So what happens when civilizations meet? The 'weaker' one gets eaten by the 'stronger'. You only have to look at history to see the destructive power of civilizations.

    So the main underlying idea is: what would happen if the future lands on our doorstep today? Let's take mankind, add perhaps 100 years and then let them show up on our doorstep today. The future would pretty much devour the present. Probably in a matter of, let's say, 7 days… So that's what we're looking at. But every ending also means a new beginning, hence Year Zero.

    There's all kinds of hidden messages in there. Like the virus eating away at reality, buildings and people, even at the viewers brain. It's behaving off course much like a computer virus. And the network of wires represents the future of social networking. I just made it physical and let it 'catch' the city and it's people like a net. All these ideas just serve as inspiration for us to create a future that worked for this concept. They're not meant to be deciphered by the audience. It's still meant to be just a title sequence and not an actual movie.

    Now what makes a good title sequence? Personally, I think it's something that gets you in the mood, warms you up for what you're about to experience, be it a film, tv series or in our case, the OFFF festival. We decided to treat the OFFF festival as a feature film experience. So all we had to do was get the viewer into the right state of mind. Without, of course, being too narrative led. The best title sequences out there are nothing but a random collection of images/scenes that don't tell a lot if you watch them on their own. But edit them together and a new context is created. A context that matters, a feeling that gets the viewer ready for the main event, in our case, the festival.

    To get started, the next thing we did was make a collection of ideas that would scare me and Si. So, anything drawn from our youth, right through to stuff that's inspired us over the years as well as seemingly random compositions that trigger the imagination of the viewer. For example, when we show you the aesthetics of a car explosion, it's carefully constructed. Why a car and not something else? Because an exploding car brings extra content to an otherwise simple aesthetic display of violence. A car doesn't explode by itself so instantly the brain tries to formulate the background behind it. It adds an either political or criminal edge to the violence. To me it felt appropriate because of the sense of protest and rebellion the shot has. And maybe the biggest question; was there someone in the car and if so, who was it? For me, every idea should provoke these kind of questions; from a girl in a prom dress holding a rocket launcher to a riot cop standing in the kitchen. All scenes have a pre and post story to them. In no time you're actually trying to connect these seemingly random scenes and boom; you've just created your own strange context. You now have a feeling, a taste and lots of questions probably. Questions that normally would be answered by watching the actual movie. But since there's no actual movie here we'll leave stranded with, hopefully, an uncomfortable feeling and lots of questions - some might feel unsatisfied and wondering why. Just like a nightmare.

    We also wanted the actual titles to be different this time. Most of the time festival titles are driven by the idea on how to show titles. A mechanism that displays titles in a creative way. We actually thought to bring the festival theme to the foreground and have the titles play a part in it. Incorporate them so they become the actual fiber/texture of the piece itself. Practically I still think it's nice that the viewer has to actively look for the names and not get too comfortable. Even if it means to see it a couple of times which surely is the best we can aim for as a free project ; )

    How about the shoot? Well, prior to Prague we created more than 50 ideas I could play with. This was always the intention. Go out shooting with a tiny crew, acting like we're still in art school and be open for anything that might happen. That's why we shot everything on 2 Canon 5D's (that and having no budget off course). This was a really nice change for me. Normally I prepare commercial shoots to the very last detail and there's a lot more people involved. Savage helped us out big time in Prague. We also had some bad news. Due to his back problems Si Scott had to abandon the project and couldn't join the shoot.

    When we came back from Prague I started editing straight away and soon came to the conclusion we had about 60 vfx shots to work on and no budget and increasingly less time. Remember that this project was a side dish for PostPanic, we had to work on commissioned jobs also. But everybody involved soon fell in love with the project, including STORM Postproduction who are our neighbors (luckily for us).

    In the mean time we received the title list. It had about 70 names on it! That's when I found out that the dynamics I wanted to use would probably not work. Just too many names that would make the piece too long to just show random images. So in the plane towards Prague I thought of bringing in a tiny bit of narrative. Which turned out to be the beginning of the sequence (1st act). I wrote in a lead character that would relate to the viewer.

    The idea was to trick the audience into thinking they're watching some kind of documentary. We basically follow a guy going home. Bit by bit his environment gets stranger and more uncomfortable to watch. Is he living in a war zone? Slowly the background takes over and the piece changes into an urban nightmare. And like a nightmare, the story/edit doesn't always make sense but makes you feel really uncomfortable. I also wanted the viewer to experience the nightmare. That's where the dark matter comes in. Dark matter is what I call the macro shot bits. Flashes that derail your train of thought like there's something eating away at your brain as you try to make sense of the nightmare. I wanted the viewer to go nuts, alongside with the cast. Erase the line between nightmare and reality. The end result is something you won't come across easily on your tv. And is also just another fun way to do titles.

    The sound design and music made by Hecq added a lot to the feel and scale of the film. It clearly divides the 3 acts (1st act: up to execution, 2nd from execution, 3rd final shot) and makes completely different ideas and scenes feel coherent. It also emphasizes the dynamics of the film and brings the much needed pace at the end. It's been great working with Ben. We've been surfing the same wave length throughout the project.

    Finally I want to thank everyone involved for making these titles possible. For creating something out of nothing. For showing so much love for something as dark as this.

    CREDITS

    Directed by Mischa Rozema
    Story by Mischa Rozema & Si Scott
    Production Company: PostPanic
    Executive Producers: Jules Tervoort, Ania Markham
    DoP: Jiri Malek, Mischa Rozema
    Music & Sound Design: Hecq
    Senior Producer: Annejes van Liempd
    Production Assistant: Jacinta Ramaker
    Production Designer: Roland Mylanus
    Editor: Mischa Rozema

    Prague Cast:
    Main Hero: Vladan Bláha
    Grafitti Guy: Tom Malar
    Main Hero Sister: Katerina Galova

    Post-Production: PostPanic
    CG Supervisor: Ivor Goldberg
    VFX Supervisor: Chris Staves
    3D Artists: Jeroen Aerts, Matthijs Joor, Jurriën Boogert, Marnix Reckman, Adam Janeczek
    2D Artist: Erwin van den IJssel
    3D Interns: Cara To, Xander Clerckx
    2D Interns: Mathijs Luijten, Per Westholm
    Compositing: Chris Staves, Ivor Goldberg, Adam Janeczek, Matthijs Joor
    Graphic Designs: Si Scott
    Additional Graffiti Elements: Florian Stumpe
    Matte Painting: Wieger Poutsma
    Additional 3D and Compositing: Storm PostProduction

    Production (Prague) by Savage:
    Executive Producer: Klara Kralickova, Pavla Burgetova Callegari
    Producer: Michaela Berkova
    Production Assistant: Vojta Ruzicka
    Prop master: Jan Fiala
    Location Scout & Management: Petr Bastar, Adam Fuchs
    Location: CREVISTON, a.s.
    Tattoos made by: Wowa tattoo prague

    # vimeo.com/24982650 Uploaded
  3. Entry from July 27, 2009 "We are jet-lagged and exhausted. The alarm blared at 4:30 am. Without opening my eyes I hit the snooze. "Just five more minutes" I told myself… "Lets go dude" a groggy voice commanded from the background. I didn't move. Out of nowhere, a pillow slammed down on my head, the mattress is lifted out from under me, and I hit the hardwood floor just missing my camera bag. "Ugh not again" I thought, but I knew he was right, we needed to hustle across the city and get our cameras rolling before sunrise. "

    We were in Paris with only a week to shoot. Armed with top of the line cameras, fresh batteries, memory card wallets, and our favorite glass. The game-plan was to shoot as much as possible and to motivate each other when we were exhausted from staring down the viewfinder. Time-lapses were just an afterthought. Seen a couple. Heard a bit on what it takes to get one done. But when we stepped off the plane in Paris, we had never seen the sky as beautiful as it was. Some twenty two hours later, we slept...at least tried to...

    We had never shot a time-lapse before, we had never put one together. We were just two guys who came to Paris to photograph. To make beautiful images. And we did. And we didn't stop. It became a battle against our batteries. " Why take one when you can take one-thousand" we'd laugh. Sometimes staying at a spot all day. Biking or walking from place to place. Mispronouncing words we didn't know. Two more packs of Camel's gone. We shot and shot and uploaded wherever we were. Even ran through the terabyte we brought with us and had to buy another one at Rue Montgalet ( nightmare ). Fell asleep on the Alexander III bridge while the clicks of our camera shutters became an urban lullaby.

    Wandering around the streets of Paris armed with $20,000 in gear, we took Paris head on.

    Its a scary feeling when you burn through a 32 gigabyte card before the day is done. You don't see what you're shooting. You compose the first frame and let your subject do the rest. We would wait for that perfect set of clouds or that perfect flare or trail from a plane. And all the while we didn't know what the final product would look like. We were shooting blind. But we wouldn't have had it any other way. The unknown kept us moving. Kept us thinking about what could happen when we return. Kept us thinking about what all these different pieces might say in the end.

    Changing glass as much as we did, we didn't factor in the amount of sensor dust that would build up. We could never just shoot something once, from one angle, without doing brackets and panoramic builds. It became an obsession. And our shutters paid the price. Back home, it took weeks to get organized. Then it took months working between all these side projects, our main gig at BorrowLenses.com, and the Paris project. Just beginning to think about what we would do with all the clips became overwhelming. There wasn't an obvious flow. There didn't seem to be a complete overall puzzle that could even be constructed with the pieces we had. And the pieces were in pieces.

    We started building each clip in After Effects. Render. Smoke. Chill. Re-Render. Smoke. Chill. We built around 150 clips out of the time-lapses we shot in Paris. They were flickery, noisy, grainy, bandy but they were ours. And we spent more time trying to fix them than we ever imagined. They were the first of the series. And from a single Clint Mansell song from "The Wrestler" sparked a vision for the Volumes. And once we put the first ones on Vimeo, we knew we had something going. We built the second one with a Tycho song. The third from Flying Lotus. The fourth from Pelican City. And after the fourth volume was built, we saw all these comments about the sensor dust. And THAT ate away at us.

    So we started from scratch; as if we had just hoped off the plane from Paris. Reorganize, re-edit, recolor, re-render. Days and days of work. Going through entire albums trying to find that one song that would go perfectly with all the clips strung together. But we didn't know how they would all hold together. There was no obvious order again. And we didn't think we could fill the twenty volume quota that we had promised to our fans. So we settled on doing a Director's Cut. A montage of all of the clips: Paris Volume 5.

    Enter Pigeon Point. We had been shooting a new series called the California Coastline. And we went to Pigeon Point down in Santa Cruz with our friend Matt. At first it didn't seem like a prime spot for time-lapses. But Matt didn't tell us the most amazing thing about Pigeon Point. They installed a new temporary 6-beam setup while the main lighthouse wasn't operational. We shot through the night, edited the next day, and posted on Monday. While we were editing, Mogwai popped into the playlist. To be honest we never sat down and listened to Mogwai with our work but it turned out that Friend of the Night fit that piece like a glove. And so we chose 2 Rights Make 1 Wrong for the first part of Volume 5. And we chose Explosions in the Sky, First Breath After Coma for the last part of the volume. It was perfect.

    We knew what we did best….Own a spot. Literally shoot the shit out of it. We learned a lot since Paris and shot a ton of other projects since we returned. The constant was a pattern. A style, a flow, a complete piece each in its own right. And we laid down the tracks, and then each clip, piece by piece. We cut and recut and re-rendered and fill gaps and cut tighter and sharper. We began to complete the puzzle. And it became what you see before you.

    Enjoy it. Its been a long time coming but we think the wait is well worth it.

    Sincerely,
    Thom & Vin

    Music-
    Mogwai - 2 Rights Make 1 Wrong
    Explosions in the Sky - First Breath After Coma

    Follow us @seventhmovement
    Facebook us facebook.com/pages/The-Seventh-Movement/152426741455631
    web: seventhmovement.com

    # vimeo.com/15110823 Uploaded 313K Plays 126 Comments
  4. backstage from the video " Explore your dual world", human face video mapping by Oskar & Gaspar.
    We used 2 video projectors, 1 for the actor, the 2º for the background.
    No post production or digital correction.
    agency: Excentric
    client: Samsung Portugal
    video: Droid_id
    music: Timecoders

    # vimeo.com/39697056 Uploaded 168K Plays 50 Comments
  5. In this exclusive SoundWorks Collection profile we talk with Director Alfonso Cuarón and Re-recording Mixer Skip Lievsay about the sound teams work to create a dramatic sound scape to a dark and vast outer space environment.

    Academy Award® winners Sandra Bullock (“The Blind Side”) and George Clooney (“Syriana”) star in “Gravity,” a heart-pounding thriller that pulls you into the infinite and unforgiving realm of deep space. The film was directed by Oscar® nominee Alfonso Cuarón (“Children of Men”).

    Dr. Ryan Stone (Bullock) is a brilliant medical engineer on her first shuttle mission, with veteran astronaut Matt Kowalski (Clooney) in command. But on a seemingly routine mission, disaster strikes. The shuttle is destroyed, leaving Stone and Kowalski completely alone—tethered to nothing but each other and spiraling out into the blackness. The deafening silence tells them they have lost any link to Earth…and any chance for rescue. As fear turns to panic, every gulp of air eats away at what little oxygen is left.

    But the only way home may be to go further out into the terrifying expanse of space.
    “Gravity” was written by Alfonso Cuarón & Jonás Cuarón, and produced by Alfonso Cuarón and David Heyman (the “Harry Potter” films). Chris deFaria, Nikki Penny and Stephen Jones served as executive producers.

    The behind-the-scenes team includes multiple Oscar®-nominated director of photography Emmanuel Lubezki (“Children of Men,” “The New World”); production designer Andy Nicholson (art director “Alice in Wonderland”); editors Alfonso Cuarón and Mark Sanger (VFX editor “Children of Men”); and costume designer Jany Temime (the “Harry Potter” films). The visual effects were handled by Oscar®-nominated visual effects supervisor Tim Webber (“The Dark Knight”). The music was composed by Steven Price (“Attack the Block”).

    Locate a theater to experience Gravity in Dolby Atmos at dolby.com

    For more exclusive videos check out SoundWorksCollection.com
    Join the SoundWorks Collection Vimeo Channel: vwww.vimeo.com/channels/soundworkscollection
    SoundWorks Collection Mailing List: http://bit.ly/15lOelU

    NOTE: Feel free to re-embed and share this SoundWorks Collection video, but please do not download source video and repost without permission.

    # vimeo.com/76123849 Uploaded 324K Plays 39 Comments

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