1. Did you know that over 1 in 4 Kiwi kids lives in poverty? That's 270,000 children. Enough to fill our biggest rugby stadium five and a half times.

    These could be the doctors and nurses we need to look after our aging population. Our scientists, artists, entrepreneurs. Our future all blacks and silver ferns. But what does living in poverty mean in New Zealand?

    It means too many Kiwi kids live in rental or temporary accommodation, sleeping in damp and mouldy bedrooms, spending winter in a house that is too expensive to heat.

    Living like this makes our kids sick - Almost 190,000 had serious health problems in the last year. Things like pneumonia, rheumatic fever and meningococcal disease. Babies and pre-schoolers are particularly vulnerable as they spend most of their time at home. But it doesn't have to be this way.

    If New Zealand introduced a WOF for private and public rental housing we could make sure that no child has to live in a cold, damp, poorly maintained home.

    The current regulations for rental housing date back to 1947. It's hard to believe, but some rental properties don't even meet basic standards for sanitation or safety. It's time we got our act together and provided better insulated homes which are more affordable to heat.

    If it's good enough for our cars, then why not our kids?

    Credits:
    Written & voiced by Siouxsie Wiles.
    Recorded by Neil Morrison.
    Commissioned by Jilly Evans.
    Animated by MohawkMedia.co.nz

    Published under Creative Commons - BY-NC-SA (Attribution - Non Commercial - Share Alike) License.

    This is the first in a series of animations launched at the workshop 'Investing In Our Nation's Kids Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand' (http://tinyurl.com/cy9rlpo) in March 2013. The statistics and recommendations are drawn from the report to the Children's Commissioner on Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand: occ.org.nz/publications/child_poverty.

    # vimeo.com/74680219 Uploaded 88 Plays 0 Comments
  2. Did you know that over 1 in 4 Kiwi kids lives in poverty? That's 270,000 children. Enough to fill our biggest rugby stadium five and a half times.

    But what does living in poverty mean in New Zealand? It means that 1 in 5 kiwi households with school age kids do not have enough food to feed their families
    That too many of our kids go to school without eating breakfast, or are growing up without the fresh fruit and vegetables they need.

    This is bad for our kids, being hungry at school affects our children's ability to learn.
    Poor nutrition in childhood is also linked to developmental delays, more frequent illnesses and obesity

    It doesn't have to be this way. If New Zealand supports breakfast and lunch clubs in schools we can make sure no Kiwi kids go hungry.

    Programmes like these have been shown to promote a healthy diet, and to improve children's school attendance, behaviour, and ability to learn. Breakfast clubs also provide a safe, early morning place to increase social skills and confidence, creating a better school environment.

    It's time we got our act together and supported our schools, communities and businesses to turn all Kiwi kids into healthy, well educated adults. These could be the doctors and nurses we need to look after our aging population. Our scientists, artists, entrepreneurs. Our future all blacks and silver ferns.

    In the end, it's not just hungry kids that benefit, but all New Zealanders.

    Credits:
    Written & voiced by Siouxsie Wiles.
    Recorded by Neil Morrison.
    Commissioned by Jilly Evans.
    Animated by MohawkMedia.co.nz

    Published under Creative Commons - BY-NC-SA (Attribution - Non Commercial - Share Alike) License.

    This is the second in a series of animations launched at the workshop 'Investing In Our Nation's Kids Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand' (http://tinyurl.com/cy9rlpo) in March 2013. The statistics and recommendations are drawn from the report to the Children's Commissioner on Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand: occ.org.nz/publications/child_poverty

    # vimeo.com/74680220 Uploaded 228 Plays 1 Comment
  3. Did you know that over 1 in 4 Kiwi kids lives in poverty? That's 270,000 children. Enough to fill our biggest rugby stadium five and a half times.

    Many families living in poverty have little or no access to affordable credit when they need it. Imagine having to resort to borrowing from a loan shark if your fridge or washing machine broke down. Its sad that for some Kiwi families a simple thing like a broken appliance can leave them with a spiralling debt problem for months and years. But it doesn't have be this way

    (Business) Partnerships between the government, banking sector and community groups, could offer modest, low or zero interest loans, mortgages, insurance and debt consolidation to those families who need it the most.

    In other countries, these partnerships are called social lending or micro-finance systems. Social lending fills the gap between banks and loan sharks, so that less families get caught with spiralling debt, trapped in poverty.

    Let's stop low income families falling prey to high interest rates and through roll out social lending schemes and a national programme to increase financial literacy. In the end, all New Zealanders will benefit.

    Credits:
    Written & voiced by Siouxsie Wiles.
    Recorded by Richard Smith.
    Commissioned by Jilly Evans.
    Animated by MohawkMedia.co.nz

    Published under Creative Commons - BY-NC-SA (Attribution - Non Commercial - Share Alike) License.

    This is the third in a series of animations launched at the workshop 'Investing In Our Nation's Kids Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand' (http://tinyurl.com/cy9rlpo) in March 2013. The statistics and recommendations are drawn from the report to the Children's Commissioner on Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand: occ.org.nz/publications/child_poverty

    # vimeo.com/74682662 Uploaded 100 Plays 0 Comments
  4. Did you know that over 1 in 4 Kiwi kids lives in poverty? That's 270,000 children.Enough to fill our biggest rugby stadium five and a half times.

    When children were asked about their solutions to child poverty, one of their main ideas was safe public spaces to meet and play together.

    Children also said being poor limited their opportunities for leisure and community activities. This is important because a child's inability to take part in the same social and leisure activities as their peers means they often experience bullying and are fearful of stigma and social isolation.

    So what are safe and accessible public spaces? These are local playgrounds and parks. But safe and free public spaces can also include libraries, museums, skate-parks, sports fields, town squares, walkways, bridges...even underpasses...anywhere kids want to hang out safely together.

    Sadly, many kids referred to their local areas as 'scary places' and many have seen aggression or drunkenness, or have been harassed by adults or older youths.

    Safe and accessible local spaces are important.

    They're free, children don't need transport to get there, all kids with different abilities and ages can participate, and children don't need much parental supervision to use them.

    All kids deserve the opportunity to play with their friends, even if they are poor.

    Allowing kids to manage their free time, and maintain their own spaces, will help them become more responsible adults and engaged citizens.

    Let's give our kids safe spaces to meet, learn and play that are accessible and inclusive for all children. If it was good enough for us, then why not our kids?

    Credits:
    Written & voiced by Siouxsie Wiles.
    Recorded by Richard Smith.
    Commissioned by Jilly Evans.
    Animated by MohawkMedia.co.nz

    Published under Creative Commons - BY-NC-SA (Attribution - Non Commercial - Share Alike) License.

    This is the fourth in a series of animations launched at the workshop 'Investing In Our Nation's Kids Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand' (http://tinyurl.com/cy9rlpo) in March 2013. The statistics and recommendations are drawn from the report to the Children's Commissioner on Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand: occ.org.nz/publications/child_poverty

    # vimeo.com/74680221 Uploaded 66 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Did you know that over 1 in 4 Kiwi kids lives in poverty? That's 270,000 children. Enough to fill our biggest rugby stadium five and a half times.

    Too many kids in solo parent families are living in poverty. But did you know that child support payments made by absent parents are kept by the New Zealand Government if their former partner who is caring for their children is on state benefits?

    In 2011 the payments withheld by government amounted to a staggering $159 million. Money denied to kiwi kids, many of whom are living in poverty. Passing on just a small fraction of these child support payments would make a huge difference for children living in low income families.

    The Child Support Amendment Bill was recently passed by Parliament, and was a rare opportunity to make an important policy change for children. The government chose not to do this. They didn't include pass-on payments, even after this was strongly recommended to the Select Committee considering the Bill.

    We need to let the politicians know this isn't acceptable. If we start with a capped per child pass-on rate of just $10 per week, less Kiwi kids living with solo parents will have to go cold and hungry.

    These kids are the future doctors and nurses who will take care of our ageing population, our teachers, journalists and engineers.

    In the end, it's not just poor kids that benefit, but all New Zealanders.

    Credits:

    Written & voiced by Siouxsie Wiles.
    Recorded by Richard Smith.
    Commissioned by Jilly Evans.
    Animated by MohawkMedia.co.nz
    Published under Creative Commons - BY-NC-SA (Attribution - Non Commercial - Share Alike) License.

    This is the fifth in a series of animations launched at the workshop 'Investing In Our Nation's Kids Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand' (http://tinyurl.com/cy9rlpo) in March 2013. The statistics and recommendations are drawn from the report to the Children's Commissioner on Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand: occ.org.nz/publications/child_poverty

    # vimeo.com/74680225 Uploaded 56 Plays 0 Comments

Child Poverty Solutions NZ

Mohawk Media Plus

Animated series launched at 'Investing In Our Nation's Kids - Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand', held at Auckland University in March 2013 (http://bit.ly/182Nrbp). All statistics and recommendations are drawn from the report published by the…


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Animated series launched at 'Investing In Our Nation's Kids - Solutions to Child Poverty in New Zealand', held at Auckland University in March 2013 (http://bit.ly/182Nrbp). All statistics and recommendations are drawn from the report published by the NZ Children's Commissioner in 2012 (http://bit.ly/PKo1XH).

Written & voiced by Siouxsie Wiles. Commissioned by Jilly Evans. Illustration and animation by MohawkMedia.co.nz

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