1. / About the Project

    The remnants of the past are still a significant part of the modern era. Our cultural institutions are the product of those who lived before us and of the societies they built.

    For this project, I travelled to 14 cities in 4 countries filled with history: England, France, Italy and Spain. Each of these countries had a major influence in shaping the world in which we live in.

    In Civilization: The Rise of Europe you will see the remains of the vast Roman Empire, the intertwined Muslim, Christian and Jewish cultures, the birthplace of the Age of Enlightenment, the European emblem of parliamentary democracy as well as many UNESCO World Heritage sites.

    It is also those same countries that would eventually embark on a journey to the New World and build the foundations of America.

    Civilization will make you travel in the past, but also in the present, to show you the enormous steps mankind has made throughout history. Hopefully it will give you awareness of our incredible cultural heritage.

    / Technical Info

    Camera: Canon 5D Mark II
    Lenses: Canon 16-35 II, Canon 70-200 II
    Licensed Music: Am I Not Human by Phoenix & Bergersen

    / Licensing

    For licensing information please visit: dominicboudreault.com/licensing

    / Connect with Me

    Website: dominicboudreault.com
    Twitter: twitter.com/domboudreault
    Instagram: instagram.com/dominicboudreault

    # vimeo.com/57405003 Uploaded 191K Plays 83 Comments
  2. Rome is a city where you can enjoy the legacy of a nearly forgotten civilization. Even today we can feel the greatness of an empire that conquered, then brought it's art and engineering to half of the world.

    In Urbs Aeterna, Enrique Pacheco uses time-lapse technique to show us the extraordinary achievements of the Roman architecture and the ruins of some of the most emblematic buildings of the city.

    ------------------------------------

    Follow me:
    enriquepacheco.com

    twitter.com/EnriquePacheco_
    facebook.com/eppacheco
    instagram.com/enrique_pacheco_photo

    - If you want to license this footage, it’s available in super sharp 4k at my store: enriquepacheco.com/portfolio_page/rome-stock/

    // or you can contact the media department: media@enriquepacheco.com

    (please only professional enquires, high quality footage is not for free)

    # vimeo.com/67578833 Uploaded 45.7K Plays 57 Comments
  3. A longer version is available on YouTube at:
    vimeo.com/15808133.

    Rome Reborn is an international initiative to use 3D digital technology to illustrate the urban development of the ancient city from the first settlements in the late Bronze Age (ca. 1000 BCE) to the depopulation of the city in the early Middle Ages (ca. 552 CE). Thus far, the Rome Reborn team has concentrated on modeling the city as it might have appeared in 320 CE when it reached the peak of its development with a population estimated to be ca. 1 million people occupying ca. 25 sq. km. of space inside the late-antique walls and using ca. 7,000 buildings.

    An interactive earlier version of this model, called Rome Reborn 1.0 (9 million polygons) has been available at no cost since 2008 in the Gallery of Google Earth, where it is called "Ancient Rome 3D." This present version (October 2010) is called Rome Reborn 2.1. It has over 650 million polygons and still a work in progress. Before being released to the public as an interactive product capable of being explored in real time over the Internet, we need to review and correct the model archaeologically; and find a suitable technology platform for making such a massive model available to Internet users. Work is underway to address both issues.

    Meanwhile, we offer this video exploration of the model, which we hope will already be found useful by students and teachers of ancient Roman topography and by the general public.

    This video is copyright 2010 by Bernard Frischer. All rights reserved. The 3D models comprising Rome Reborn 2.1 are copyright: 2007 by The Regents of the University of California; 2007 by the CNRS, Bordeaux; 2009 by the Universite' de Caen; and 2010 by Frischer Consulting, Inc. All rights reserved. For additional credits, please see the end of the video.

    For more about this project, see: romereborn.virginia.edu.

    For further information about this video, please write or call the project director, Prof. Bernard Frischer at:

    cell: +1.310.266.0183
    email: bernard.d.frischer@gmail.com
    personal webpage: frischerconsulting.com/frischer

    # vimeo.com/11805593 Uploaded 102K Plays 4 Comments

Rome and Medieval EU

J Dines

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