1. Nov. 9, 2012: The First Amendment Law Review hosted a 25 Year Retrospective of the Hazelwood decision. Dean Erwin Chemerinsky (Dean, UC-Irvine School of Law) delivered the keynote address. It’s been nearly 25 years since the Supreme Court rolled back students’ First Amendment rights in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier. Join experts from the fields of law, education and journalism for a conversation about how the rise in censorship — including the recent leap of Hazelwood from K-12 schools to college campuses — has affected young people’s civic readiness. Has the pendulum swung too far toward school authority, and how can schools foster meaningful civic participation from their students in a Hazelwood world?

    # vimeo.com/60254277 Uploaded 17 Plays 0 Comments
  2. Nov. 9, 2012: Frank LoMonte, executive director at the Student Press Law Center, speaks at the 25 year Retrospective on Hazelwood and Student First Amendment Rights.

    The First Amendment Law Review hosted a 25 Year Retrospective of the Hazelwood decision.
    It’s been nearly 25 years since the Supreme Court rolled back students’ First Amendment rights in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier. Join experts from the fields of law, education and journalism for a conversation about how the rise in censorship — including the recent leap of Hazelwood from K-12 schools to college campuses — has affected young people’s civic readiness. Has the pendulum swung too far toward school authority, and how can schools foster meaningful civic participation from their students in a Hazelwood world?

    # vimeo.com/60255567 Uploaded 12 Plays 0 Comments
  3. Nov. 9, 2012: Panel on Hazelwood's Impact on Schools as part of the 25 year retrospective of Hazelwood sponsored by the UNC Center for Media Law and Policy, Student Press Law Center, First Amendment Law Review and North Carolina Scholastic Media Association.
    Moderator: Bill Marshall (UNC School of Law)
    Panelists: Emily Gold Waldman (Pace Law School Professor), Neal Ramee (Tharrington Smith), Allison Schafer (General Counsel/NC School Board Association)

    The First Amendment Law Review hosted a 25 Year Retrospective of the Hazelwood decision.
    It’s been nearly 25 years since the Supreme Court rolled back students’ First Amendment rights in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier. Join experts from the fields of law, education and journalism for a conversation about how the rise in censorship — including the recent leap of Hazelwood from K-12 schools to college campuses — has affected young people’s civic readiness. Has the pendulum swung too far toward school authority, and how can schools foster meaningful civic participation from their students in a Hazelwood world?

    # vimeo.com/60256696 Uploaded 36 Plays 0 Comments
  4. Nov. 9, 2012: Moderator: Dan Kozlowski (Assistant Professor, Saint Louis University Department of Communication)
    Panelists: Frank LoMonte (Student Press Law Center), Steven Shapiro(Legal Director, ACLU; Columbia Law Professor), Mary Rose Papandrea (Boston College Law Professor, Visiting Professor UNC School of Law)

    The First Amendment Law Review hosted a 25 Year Retrospective of the Hazelwood decision.
    It’s been nearly 25 years since the Supreme Court rolled back students’ First Amendment rights in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier. Join experts from the fields of law, education and journalism for a conversation about how the rise in censorship — including the recent leap of Hazelwood from K-12 schools to college campuses — has affected young people’s civic readiness. Has the pendulum swung too far toward school authority, and how can schools foster meaningful civic participation from their students in a Hazelwood world?

    # vimeo.com/60259111 Uploaded 85 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Sep. 27, 2011: Mary-Rose Papandrea, an associate professor in the Boston College School of Law, discussed the new challenges the digital age poses to the First Amendment rights of students and their teachers at public high schools and universities. The Supreme Court has issued a series of decisions in the last few years that are highly protective of First Amendment rights. Among other things, violent video games can be sold to minors, a religious group can say hateful things outside of a funeral, and corporations must be free to make unlimited independent expenditures during political campaigns. But when it comes to students and government employees, the Court has taken a much more limited view of the First Amendment. Professor Papandrea will argue that the Court's decisions in this area are misguided.

    # vimeo.com/60272589 Uploaded 156 Plays 0 Comments

Student Speech

Browse This Channel

Shout Box

Heads up: the shoutbox will be retiring soon. It’s tired of working, and can’t wait to relax. You can still send a message to the channel owner, though!

Channels are a simple, beautiful way to showcase and watch videos. Browse more Channels.