1. PostPanic director Mischa Rozema's new short film, Stardust, is a story about Voyager 1 (the unmanned spacecraft launched in 1977 to explore the outer solar system). The probe is the furthest man-made object from the sun and witnesses unimaginable beauty and destruction. The film was triggered by the death of Dutch graphic designer Arjan Groot, who died aged 39 on 16th July 2011 from cancer.

    The entire team at PostPanic (the Amsterdam-based creative company) pushed themselves in their own creative post techniques to produce a primarily CG short film crafted with love.

    The film's story centers on the idea that in the grand scheme of the universe, nothing is ever wasted and it finds comfort in us all essentially being Stardust ourselves. Voyager represents the memories of our loved ones and lives that will never disappear.

    From a creative standpoint, Rozema wanted to explore our preconceived perceptions of how the universe appears which are fed to us by existing imagery from sources such NASA or even sci-fi films. By creating a generated universe, Rozema was able to take his own 'camera' to other angles and places within the cosmos.
    Objects and experiences we are visually familiar with are looked at from a different point of view. For example, standing on the surface of the sun looking upwards or witnessing the death and birth of a star  - not at all scientifically correct but instead a purely artistic interpretation of such events.

    Rozema says, 'I wanted to show the universe as a beautiful but also destructive place. It's somewhere we all have to find our place within. As a director, making Stardust was a very personal experience but it's not intended to be a personal film and I would want people to attach their own meanings to the film so that they can also find comfort based on their own histories and lives.'

    Rozema turned to his regular audio partner, Guy Amitai, to create the music for the film. 'I approached Guy to make the music because I trust him and knew he would instinctively understand what I wanted to communicate with this film.'  Their long-term collaboration over the years helped them explore different musical approaches before finally settling on a musical journey featuring analogue instruments. Amitai explains, 'Once we started working on this project and I told people about Stardust and what Arjan meant to us all, the offers started pouring in. Musician friends and friends-of-friends all wanting to join in and record even the smallest parts. It was an incredibly emotional and personal journey for us all - not something you can professionally detach yourself from.'

    The track is now available for purchase, with all proceeds going to the KWF (Dutch Cancer Society)
    Download the song here via iTunes: http://tinyurl.com/a6j2f34

    Credits:

    A PostPanic Production

    Written & directed by Mischa Rozema

    Produced by Jules Tervoort

    VFX Supervisor: Ivor Goldberg
    Associate VFX Supervisor: Chris Staves
    Senior digital artists: Matthijs Joor, Jeroen Aerts
    Digital artists: Marti Pujol, Silke Finger, Mariusz Kolodziejczak, Dieuwer Feldbrugge, Cara To, Jurriën Boogert
    Camera & edit: Mischa Rozema
    Production: Ania Markham, Annejes van Liempd

    Audio by Pivot Audio , Guy Amitai
    Featuring "Helio" by Ruben Samama

    copyright 2013 Post Panic BV, All rights reserved

    # vimeo.com/58626695 Uploaded 733K Plays 324 Comments
  2. It's not easy to come up with something new when you visit the same place every year for more than a decade. Over the years Marsel has created the most extensive and most popular night photography portfolio of Namibia on this planet, and two years ago he decided it was time to take it to the next level.

    The idea was to create a night photography timelapse video featuring his most popular subjects in this amazing country: the fairytale-like quivertrees and the eery, dead camelthorn trees in Deadvlei - something that had never been done before. But instead of going for static scenes, Marsel decided to add movement to the scenes by using a dolly system.

    All scenes were shot during the night with Nikon D3, D3s and D4 cameras. We used small headlights for selectively lighting trees and rocks, and we sometimes used the moon. The brighter the scene, the more moon there was at the time. For the arch scene we timed our shoot exactly with moonset, which involved quite a bit of calculating and planning. But the hardest one of all was probably the mist scene in Deadvlei. Mist in Deadvlei only occurs around five times a year, so we had to keep a close eye on the weather predictions and many attempts were unsuccessful. When we finally got it right, the results far exceeded our expectations and show Deadvlei as no one has ever seen it before.

    Each second of video consists of 30 photographs. In total, Marsel shot more than 16,000 images over a period of two years for this project.

    The video won First Prize in the 2012 Travel Photographer Of The Year Awards.

    Marsel & Daniella

    Credits:
    Director: Marsel van Oosten
    Editor: Daniella Sibbing
    Composer: Simon Wilkinson
    Produced by: Squiver

    Equipment used:
    Cameras: Nikon D3, D3s and D4
    Lenses: Nikon 14-24/2.8 and 24-70/2.8
    Tripods: Gitzo
    Dolly: Stage Zero, Dynamic Perception

    Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/Squiver
    Follow us on Facebook: facebook.com/marselvanoostenphotography

    # vimeo.com/57130400 Uploaded 797K Plays 137 Comments
  3. At a star party in August 2009 I took my first long exposure photograph of the night sky. I was so thrilled with the results that I dedicated most moonless weekends since then to photographing two things I love the most in nature - the night sky and the Ocean.

    Taking a series of images and combining them into a time lapse video sequence made it even more interesting. I have since experimented with all-night time lapses, panning motion, etc. But most importantly I've enjoyed the journey immensely.

    This time lapse video is the result of almost 1.5 years of work, 31 hours of taking images during six nights on Southern Ocean Coast in Australia.

    Ocean Sky was awarded the overall winner prize at STARMUS astrophotography competition:
    starmus.com/pages/en/winners-starmus-astro-photography-competition128.php

    The background music is by Redmann
    toucanmusic.co.uk/artists/artist.php?q=Redmann

    Alex Cherney

    terrastro.com

    # vimeo.com/24253126 Uploaded 2M Plays 48 Comments
  4. Featuring an original score by Bear McCreary (Battlestar Galactica, The Walking Dead, Eureka, etc) bearmccreary.com Thanks to Bear for taking the time to do this!

    Watch in HD
    dakotalapse.com/2012/02/temporal-distortion-2/ for more info and digital download.

    There is a 23 minute extended cut, available for digital download here dakotalapse.com/2012/02/temporal-distortion-extended-cut/ The feature is 23+ minutes of Milky Way, Aurora and other night timelapse, it has 2 original scores by Simon Wilkinson thebluemask.com , as well as some from his royalty free collection.

    Download an MP3 of Bear McCreary's Temporal Distortion on Amazon http://tinyurl.com/8955prd or on Itunes
    ___________________________________________________________________________________

    What you see is real, but you can't see it this way with the naked eye. It is the result of thousands of 20-30 second exposures, edited together to produce the timelapse. This allows you to see the Milky Way, Aurora and other Phenonmena, in a way you wouldn't normally see them.

    In the opening "Dakotalapse" title shot, you see bands of red and green moving across the sky. After asking several Astronomers, they are possible noctilucent clouds, airglow or faint Aurora. I never got a definite answer to what it is. You can also see the red and green bands in other shots.

    At :53 and 2:17 seconds into the video you see a Meteor with a Persistent Train. Which is ionizing gases, which lasted over a half hour in the cameras frame. Phil Plait wrote an article about the phenomena here blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2011/10/02/a-meteors-lingering-tale/
    There is a second Meteor with a much shorter persistent train at 2:51 in the video. This one wasn't backlit by the moon like the first, and moves out of the frame quickly.

    The Aurora were shot in central South Dakota in September 2011 and near Madison, Wisconsin on October 25, 2011.

    Watch for two Deer at 1:27

    Most of the video was shot near the White River in central South Dakota during September and October 2011, there are other shots from Arches National Park in Utah, and Canyon of the Ancients area of Colorado during June 2011.

    Equipment Used
    Thanks to Dynamic Perception for their support and for making the Stage Zero Dolly. dynamicperception.com The best dolly made in many ways!

    Canon 5D Mark II and Canon 60D
    Canon 16-35, Tokina 11-16

    Shot in RAW format. Manual mode, Exposure was 30 seconds on most Milky Way shots, 15-30 seconds on Aurora. ISO 1600 - 6400 F2.8. 3 second intervals between exposures

    Production Assistants - River Halverson and Kelly McIlhone

    Opening title by Gus Winkelman // Winkelmedia LLC // Contact Guswinkelman@gmail for creative solutions

    Available in 4K Digital Cinema

    Contact for licensing footage, or anything else.
    Randy Halverson
    dakotalapse.com
    dakotalapse@gmail.com
    Follow:
    Google + plus.google.com/115274420552571826637/posts

    Facebook facebook.com/dakotalapse

    Twitter twitter.com/dakotalapse

    # vimeo.com/36684976 Uploaded 1.8M Plays 197 Comments
  5. Follow on:
    https://facebook.com/TSOphotography for more photos, videos and updates.

    This was filmed between 4th and 11th April 2011. I had the pleasure of visiting El Teide.
    Spain´s highest mountain @(3718m) is one of the best places in the world to photograph the stars and is also the location of Teide Observatories, considered to be one of the world´s best observatories.

    The goal was to capture the beautiful Milky Way galaxy along with one of the most amazing mountains I know El Teide. I have to say this was one of the most exhausting trips I have done. There was a lot of hiking at high altitudes and probably less than 10 hours of sleep in total for the whole week. Having been here 10-11 times before I had a long list of must-see locations I wanted to capture for this movie, but I am still not 100% used to carrying around so much gear required for time-lapse movies.

    A large sandstorm hit the Sahara Desert on the 9th April (http://bit.ly/g3tsDW) and at approx 3am in the night the sandstorm hit me, making it nearly impossible to see the sky with my own eyes.

    Interestingly enough my camera was set for a 5 hour sequence of the milky way during this time and I was sure my whole scene was ruined. To my surprise, my camera had managed to capture the sandstorm which was backlit by Grand Canary Island making it look like golden clouds. The Milky Way was shining through the clouds, making the stars sparkle in an interesting way. So if you ever wondered how the Milky Way would look through a Sahara sandstorm, look at 00:32.

    Available in Digital Cinema 4k.

    Follow Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TSOPhotography
    Follow Twitter:
    http://twitter.com/TSOPhotography
    Follow Google+:
    https://plus.google.com/107543460658107759808

    Press/licensing/projects contact: tsophotography@gmail.com

    Music by my friend: Ludovico Einaudi - "Nuvole bianche" with permission.
    Please support the artist here:
    http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/una-mattina/id217799399

    # vimeo.com/22439234 Uploaded 76.7M Plays 2,804 Comments

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Nick Holroyd

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