1. Please join us for a very special opportunity to learn all about the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI). The topic includes the research being conducted at MIT in the area of solar photovoltaic and other renewable technologies. The featured speakers are Tonio Buonassisi, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, one of the foremost MIT faculty members in his field and Daniel Enderton, the Executive Director of the Sustainable Energy Revolution Program (SERP). This is a rare opportunity to get the inside scoop on MIT innovative technologies and cutting edge research and programs in the field of energy.

    Professor Tonio Buonassisi

    Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Research Interest: adoption of renewable energy technologies, and photovoltaics in particular, via breakthroughs in efficiency, cost reduction, de-bottlenecking, and increased materials utilization.
    URL: pv.mit.edu

    # vimeo.com/7459329 Uploaded 847 Plays 0 Comments
  2. Explore the History and Fate of the Universe with MIT grad and Nobel Laureate Dr. George Smoot. As part of the Science Lecture Series, The MIT Club of Northern California is pleased to announce that Dr. George Smoot, SB ’66, PhD ’71, and Nobel Laureate ’06 will present a talk, ‘The History and Fate of the Universe’, to local Alumni on October 3rd 2007. Dr. Smoot, the second most famous Smoot to graduate from MIT, will present a lecture about his mapping of the cosmic background radiation. Initially discovered by Penzias and Wilson in the early 1960’s Dr. Smoot’s work led to the discovery and mapping of minute special variations in the cosmic background radiation. These variations on the order of 1 part in 100,000 represent quantum fluctuations in the structure of the known universe when it was less than the size of a proton. They are also the seeds from which present day galaxies have evolved. The analysis of these fluctuations provides a number of insights into both the history and the future evolution of the universe.

    # vimeo.com/373231 Uploaded 307 Plays 0 Comments
  3. Dr. Tyler Jacks is director of the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. He received his A.B. in biology from Harvard College and in 1988 his Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Biophysics from the University of California, San Francisco. After graduate work with Harold Varmus, Dr. Jacks was a postdoctoral fellow with Robert Weinberg at the Whitehead Institute. Dr. Jacks is David H. Koch Professor of Biology and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His lab has pioneered the use of gene-targeting technology in transgenic mice to study cancer-associated genes and construct mouse models of human cancers of the lung, brain and ovary. Dr. Jacks was named the 2005 Simon M. Shubitz Lecturer and Award recipient, and shared the 2005 Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research awarded by Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

    The David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research is an out growth of the MIT Center for Cancer Research. The Center for Cancer Research initially established in 1973 has for over 30 years brought together extraordinary biologists in collaborative studies of human cancer. Over the past decade many of these researchers have established collaborations with other scientists and engineers at MIT. The new David H. Koch Institute, to be housed in the Koch Institute (completion date Dec 2010), will bring together in one building biologists, engineers and other scientists in order to stimulate interactive activities aimed at understanding, treating and curing human caners. While the building is not complete, the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research has been established. Major area of research include the development of nanotechnology to specifically target caner cells, advanced imaging technology to improve the early detection of human caner, programming the immune system to recognize and attack cancer cells, and systems analysis of cancer pathways and drug resistance. These programs are combining MIT’s strengths in engineering and biology to develop the next generation of cancer treatments.

    # vimeo.com/4765905 Uploaded 243 Plays 0 Comments
  4. Explore the History and Fate of the Universe with MIT grad and Nobel Laureate Dr. George Smoot. As part of the Science Lecture Series, The MIT Club of Northern California is pleased to announce that Dr. George Smoot, SB ’66, PhD ’71, and Nobel Laureate ’06 will present a talk, ‘The History and Fate of the Universe’, to local Alumni on October 3rd 2007. Dr. Smoot, the second most famous Smoot to graduate from MIT, will present a lecture about his mapping of the cosmic background radiation. Initially discovered by Penzias and Wilson in the early 1960’s Dr. Smoot’s work led to the discovery and mapping of minute special variations in the cosmic background radiation. These variations on the order of 1 part in 100,000 represent quantum fluctuations in the structure of the known universe when it was less than the size of a proton. They are also the seeds from which present day galaxies have evolved. The analysis of these fluctuations provides a number of insights into both the history and the future evolution of the universe.

    # vimeo.com/371629 Uploaded 812 Plays 0 Comments
  5. The MITCNC Life Sciences Forum is pleased to present Dr. Peter Karp. Please join us as Dr. Karp gives an overview of his cutting-edge work in bioinformatics which forms the basis for biofuel design to pharmaceutical drug development.

    Peter D. Karp is director of the Bioinformatics Research Group within the Artificial Intelligence Center at SRI International. Dr. Karp has authored more than 90 publications in bioinformatics and computer science. He received the Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from Stanford University in 1989, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Center for Biotechnology Information..

    Although the human genome has received most of the press, to date the genomes of more than 500 bacteria have been sequenced. These organisms include many important bacterial pathogens, and potential metabolic engineering hosts for biofuels efforts. The metabolic network is a biochemical factory encoded by the genome of every organism, and knowledge of the metabolic network can aid scientists in designing new drugs against pathogens, and in engineering increased biofuels production from other bacteria.

    This talk will describe a 15-year effort by my group in developing software and databases for metabolic pathway information. The talk will describe algorithms for predicting the metabolic network of an organism from its sequenced genome, which we have applied to 370 genomes and made available through the BioCyc.org Web site. We have developed a hierarchical graph layout algorithm for visualizing complete metabolic networks, as well as an algorithm for predicting anti-microbial drug targets.

    Thank you to Google, Inc for graciously hosting this event.

    # vimeo.com/890481 Uploaded 263 Plays 0 Comments

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