1. The Pacific Northwest Music Camp
    Vilem Sokol Music Director
    A Bill Fertik Film
    Camera
    Bill Fertik
    John Beymer
    Editor Rebecca Irvin
    Sound Jerry Bruck
    Mix Lee Dichter

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  2. The Bolero, Ravel
    Zubin Mehta
    Los Angeles Philharmonic
    Academy Award

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  3. Violin and Piano competition held in Moscow every four years.
    Directed and written by Bill Fertik
    Produced by Robert Dalrymple and Ken Locker
    EDITOR Brian Williams
    MUSIC Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky


    By SERGE SCHMEMANN, SPECIAL TO THE NEW YORK TIMES
    Published: July 3, 1982

    The Seventh Tchaikovsky Competition went into its final round today, with 12 young Americans hoping to emulate the glory achieved here by Van Cliburn 24 years ago, at the first of the contests.
    Mr. Cliburn, of course, went on to parlay his Tchaikovsky laurel into a celebrated career as concert pianist, and the young American pianists, cellists, violinists and singers - many of whom paid their own way to Moscow - made plain that the prize they sought was not the 3,500 rubles - officially worth $5,000 but not convertible to dollars. What they wanted more than money was the exposure and publicity provided by the renowned competition.
    The glamour, as in the days of Mr. Cliburn, is concentrated on the piano, and for James Barbagallo, a 29-year-old concert pianist from Long Island City, the competition offers a chance to open up a career that, he concedes, ''is not setting the world on fire.''
    ''The object of entering, frankly, is to get concerts,'' he said. ''I came hoping to make the finals, so my manager would have an easier time selling me.''
    Mr. Barbagallo is among the oldest of the surviving Americans. The maximum for participation is 30. Soviet critics have singled him out for praise as a ''mature professional musician with confident technique.'' Tough Competition Ahead
    Having made the finals, Mr. Barbagallo displayed few illusions about the tough competition ahead, especially from the Soviet side, which has dominated the piano since 1958. Vladimir Ovchinnikov and Kale Ranadalu of the Soviet Union have attracted particular attention, as has a Bulgarian pianist, Emma Takhmizyan.
    Mr. Barbagallo's feelings about playing in Moscow were mixed. There is, of course, the tension, he said. ''I feel fine, but nervous, and I must say I'm looking forward to this being over.'' There are also the petty problems so familiar to Western travelers in the Soviet Union - ''like trying to get a waiter, or forgetting your registration card and having a security guard who knows you perfectly well bar you from entering the Conservatory.''
    The pianist also displayed irritation at being assigned a fixed six hours of practice a day, a schedule he said left him no flexibility. But the facilities, he said, were better than those usually provided at competitions in the United States and he described the Soviet organizers as ''very, very nice.'' ''There's some cultural excursion every day,'' he added. ''They give us a special luncheon room, and on the whole it's a marvelous experience.'' 2 U.S. Players in Piano Finals
    Mr. Barbagallo is one of two Americans in the piano finals. They are ranged against five Soviet musicians, two Japanese and one each from Britain, New Zealand, the Philippines and Bulgaria.
    Jonathan Shames, 25, of Springfield, Mass., the first American to play, will perform on Monday, and Mr. Barbagallo will follow on Tuesday.
    Mr. Shames is a musician by training and family. His father is a tenor, his mother a pianist and his sister a violinist. He studied piano at the University of Michigan under Theodore Lettvin.
    But a musical family and years of study give no guarantee of a living. ''The quickest way to a career is an international competition,'' said Mr. Shames. ''And Tchaikovsky is the one.''
    At the same time, he added, it was risky to invest too many hopes and prospects on a single contest. ''In another four years there will be another Tchaikovsky competition and other finalists. ...''
    The closing ceremonies are scheduled for next Friday. Though pianists tend to keep the limelight at the Tchaikovsky, the most impressive American showing has been among violinists. Five of the 12 finalists this year are Americans, including three New Yorkers: Kerry McDermott, 20, Ralph Evans, 29, and Timothy Baker, 29, as well as Andres Cardenez, 25, of Bloomington, Ind., and Stephanie Chase, 24, of Westport, Conn. 2 Americans Among 16 Singers
    Among 16 singers in the finals, there are two Americans, Dolora Zagic and Stephen West. The cello finalists include three Americans: Anthony Ross, 22, of Kalamazoo, Mich., and Alvin McCall, of Newport News, Va., both students at the Stony Brook Campus of the State University of New York, and David Hardy, 24, a cellist with the National Symphony of Washington who studied at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore.
    For many of those who had survived the brutal winnowing process, the third and final performance, accompanied by a full orchestra, seemed almost a relief.
    ''The first two rounds are awful,'' said Mr. Ross. ''You can't take a chance like you would in a concert. Everything has to be just right, no excesses at all. In the final, you can be more yourself.''
    But not too much, according to Fernando Laires of Baltimore, an American judge in the piano competition. The Soviet judges, the largest group but, according to international practice, less than half the total, were as watchful over propriety and tradition on stage as over the quality of the performance. Many Unqualified Americans
    The Russians, in fact, were miffed by the large number of unqualified Americans who took advantage of lax entrance standards, swelling the original contingent to about 75.
    ''Apart from truly talented musicians,'' scolded the Cultural Ministry paper Sovetskaya Kultura, the ranks of Americans ''frequently included those who might be better termed simple tourists.''
    The carefully screened Russians entrants, by contrast, lost only one contestant in the passage to the piano finals, and even that was considered unusual. As a rule, veterans of the competition said, the Soviet Union doesn't enter musicians unless they are virtually certain of qualifying for the finals.
    The heavy emphasis on Russian music seemed further to tilt the scales in favor of Soviet musicians. But Mr. Barbagallo, for one, had little argument with the choice of mandatory compositions.
    ''For us,'' he said, ''the Russian music is really meaty stuff to play -it's one blockbuster after another.'' The New Yorker also had no qualms anticipating a Soviet triumph. ''It'll be very difficult to take the prize away from the Russians,'' he said. ''But I have no hassle with Russians' winning - they are magnificent piano players.''
    The Seventh Tchaikovsky Competition went into its final round today, with 12 young Americans hoping to emulate the glory achieved here by Van Cliburn 24 years ago, at the first of the contests.
    Mr. Cliburn, of course, went on to parlay his Tchaikovsky laurel into a celebrated career as concert pianist, and the young American pianists, cellists, violinists and singers - many of whom paid their own way to Moscow - made plain that the prize they sought was not the 3,500 rubles - officially worth $5,000 but not convertible to dollars. What they wanted more than money was the exposure and publicity provided by the renowned competition.
    The glamour, as in the days of Mr. Cliburn, is concentrated on the piano, and for James Barbagallo, a 29-year-old concert pianist from Long Island City, the competition offers a chance to open up a career that, he concedes, ''is not setting the world on fire.''
    ''The object of entering, frankly, is to get concerts,'' he said. ''I came hoping to make the finals, so my manager would have an easier time selling me.''
    Mr. Barbagallo is among the oldest of the surviving Americans. The maximum for participation is 30. Soviet critics have singled him out for praise as a ''mature professional musician with confident technique.'' Tough Competition Ahead
    Having made the finals, Mr. Barbagallo displayed few illusions about the tough competition ahead, especially from the Soviet side, which has dominated the piano since 1958. Vladimir Ovchinnikov and Kale Ranadalu of the Soviet Union have attracted particular attention, as has a Bulgarian pianist, Emma Takhmizyan.
    Mr. Barbagallo's feelings about playing in Moscow were mixed. There is, of course, the tension, he said. ''I feel fine, but nervous, and I must say I'm looking forward to this being over.'' There are also the petty problems so familiar to Western travelers in the Soviet Union - ''like trying to get a waiter, or forgetting your registration card and having a security guard who knows you perfectly well bar you from entering the Conservatory.''
    The pianist also displayed irritation at being assigned a fixed six hours of practice a day, a schedule he said left him no flexibility. But the facilities, he said, were better than those usually provided at competitions in the United States and he described the Soviet organizers as ''very, very nice.'' ''There's some cultural excursion every day,'' he added. ''They give us a special luncheon room, and on the whole it's a marvelous experience.'' 2 U.S. Players in Piano Finals
    Mr. Barbagallo is one of two Americans in the piano finals. They are ranged against five Soviet musicians, two Japanese and one each from Britain, New Zealand, the Philippines and Bulgaria.
    Jonathan Shames, 25, of Springfield, Mass., the first American to play, will perform on Monday, and Mr. Barbagallo will follow on Tuesday.
    Mr. Shames is a musician by training and family. His father is a tenor, his mother a pianist and his sister a violinist. He studied piano at the University of Michigan under Theodore Lettvin.
    But a musical family and years of study give no guarantee of a living. ''The quickest way to a career is an international competition,'' said Mr. Shames. ''And Tchaikovsky is the one.''
    At the same time, he added, it was risky to invest too many hopes and prospects on a single contest. ''In another four years there will be another Tchaikovsky competition and other finalists. ...''
    The closing ceremonies are scheduled for next Friday. Though pianists tend to keep the limelight at the Tchaikovsky, the most impressive American showing has been among violinists. Five of the 12 finalists this year are Americans, including three New Yorkers: Kerry McDermott, 20, Ralph Evans, 29, and Timothy Baker, 29, as well as Andres Cardenez, 25, of Bloomington, Ind., and Stephanie Chase, 24, of Westport, Conn. 2 Americans Among 16 Singers
    Among 16 singers in the finals, there are two Americans, Dolora Zagic and Stephen West. The cello finalists include three Americans: Anthony Ross, 22, of Kalamazoo, Mich., and Alvin McCall, of Newport News, Va., both students at the Stony Brook Campus of the State University of New York, and David Hardy, 24, a cellist with the National Symphony of Washington who studied at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore.
    For many of those who had survived the brutal winnowing process, the third and final performance, accompanied by a full orchestra, seemed almost a relief.
    ''The first two rounds are awful,'' said Mr. Ross. ''You can't take a chance like you would in a concert. Everything has to be just right, no excesses at all. In the final, you can be more yourself.''
    But not too much, according to Fernando Laires of Baltimore, an American judge in the piano competition. The Soviet judges, the largest group but, according to international practice, less than half the total, were as watchful over propriety and tradition on stage as over the quality of the performance. Many Unqualified Americans
    The Russians, in fact, were miffed by the large number of unqualified Americans who took advantage of lax entrance standards, swelling the original contingent to about 75.
    ''Apart from truly talented musicians,'' scolded the Cultural Ministry paper Sovetskaya Kultura, the ranks of Americans ''frequently included those who might be better termed simple tourists.''
    The carefully screened Russians entrants, by contrast, lost only one contestant in the passage to the piano finals, and even that was considered unusual. As a rule, veterans of the competition said, the Soviet Union doesn't enter musicians unless they are virtually certain of qualifying for the finals.
    The heavy emphasis on Russian music seemed further to tilt the scales in favor of Soviet musicians. But Mr. Barbagallo, for one, had little argument with the choice of mandatory compositions.
    ''For us,'' he said, ''the Russian music is really meaty stuff to play -it's one blockbuster after another.'' The New Yorker also had no qualms anticipating a Soviet triumph. ''It'll be very difficult to take the prize away from the Russians,'' he said. ''But I have no hassle with Russians' winning - they are magnificent piano players.''

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  4. Written & Directed by Bill Fertik
    Brian Williams Editor
    Produced by Robert Dalrymple
    Camera: Juan Barrera, Robert Wagner, Daniel Canton
    Sound Bob Duffus Jr.
    Boris Berezovsky 1st Prize Piano USSR
    Akiko Suwanai 1st Prize Violin Japan
    Violin and Piano competition held in Moscow every four years.

    Review/Television; Backstage at the Tchaikovsky Music Competition
    By ALLAN KOZINN
    Published: Tuesday, December 25, 1990
    Documentaries about musical competitions are usually so similar that one wonders why so many are produced. The competing musicians are shown in glimpses too brief to leave any real impression. And the behind-the-scenes elements are typically an unvarying collage of hand-wringing, worrying, collegial backslapping and sound bites about the difficulties of making musical careers.
    This ground is covered faithfully in "The Ninth International Tchaikovsky Competition," a 90-minute look at the violin and piano contests held at the Moscow Conservatory last summer. But the program, which is to be shown on Channel 13 at 9 o'clock tonight, also tells a few more interesting stories.
    Among them are allegations of corruption, both in Moscow generally and, surprisingly, at the Tchaikovsky Competition, which has been regarded as one of the world's most prestigious musical contests since it was founded in 1958. Its winners include the pianists Van Cliburn and Vladimir Ashkenazy and the violinist Gidon Kremer.
    The program was written and directed by Bill Fertik, who also filmed the competition in 1982 and 1986. But where Mr. Fertik's earlier programs showed Moscow to be a comparatively placid and orderly, if somewhat militarily dominated, city, the backdrop of this year's installment is the chaos of a society in disintegration. Soviet soldiers, fixtures of the earlier shows, are scarcely to be seen. Instead, there is a picket line of striking musicians, a street poet shouting anti-Communist verses, and passers-by who are eager to complain about their Government.
    This disarray took its toll on the Tchaikovsky competition. Because of cuts in government financing, amenities like cars, buses and translators were in short supply. In one sequence, a pianist about to play a concerto in the final round tries to discover the tempo that the Soviet conductor is going to take but they have no language in common. And in the orchestral round, contestants had to bear with a distractingly substandard orchestra.
    The musicians, some of whom said they had fond memories of the 1986 contest, complain about the hotels -- plenty of roaches, no hot water -- and about restaurants that will not admit them unless they promise to pay in dollars. Amid these grievances, Oleg Skorodumov, the chairman of the organizing committee, suggests this might be the final Tchaikovsky competition.
    The nightly news has inured Americans to stories of disarray from the Soviet Union. But allegations of corruption at competitions have been infrequent. The first inkling that something is amiss comes during a contestants' dinner, when one of the accompanists announces "the scandal of the day," and tells of finding the North Korean juror, Pac Co Sun, coaching one of his competing students between rounds. Although it is not unusual for jurors to have students among the competitors, jurors and their students are supposed to keep their distance during the contest.
    Later, James Gibb, a British juror who teaches piano at the Guildhall School in London, tells of being approached a few weeks before the contest by a contestant's uncle who wanted his niece to have some lessons. Mr. Gibb gave her a lesson, and says that when it was over the contestant's uncle handed him a sealed envelope. In it, he found $1,000 in American bills, which he returned.
    When he arrived in Moscow, Mr. Gibb discovered that other jurors had given the niece lessons as well, although he said in a telephone interview on Thursday that he was unable to determine whether any of them had been offered, or accepted, unusually high fees. His suggestion that the pianist be disqualified was rejected by the majority of the jury.
    Nor was it the end of the matter: Yevgeny Malinin, a Soviet juror, announced that the contestant's father had donated a new Hamburg Steinway piano, worth about $88,000, to the Moscow Conservatory, where the competition was held. And to muddy the waters further, the judging rules were altered so that, unlike previous years, jurors would not know how many points their colleagues gave to each contestant.
    Here Mr. Fertik's documentary drops the ball. Apparently in the interest of stressing the music rather than the scandal, this intriguing story is interrupted several times as the camera returns to the stage, and eventually it peters out inconclusively.
    The pianist at the center of the controversy is not named in the program, leaving the viewer to wonder about all the women who played. In an interview last week, one of the jurors, Daniel Pollack, of the University of California, identified her as Hae-Jung Kim, a 25-year-old Juilliard graduate. Mr. Fertik said last week that Miss Kim was not shown in the documentary.
    Nor is Miss Kim given an opportunity to tell her side of the story. She could not be reached for comment, but her sternest critic, Mr. Gibb, said on Thursday that he believed Miss Kim had been unaware of what her father and uncle were doing on her behalf. "The shame of it," he added, "is that she was a very competent pianist, and might have gone as far as she did on her own merits, had this not come up."
    Nor does the program say what became of Miss Kim, although since all the piano medalists were men, it was clear that she did not win. She was, Mr. Gibb said last week, eliminated in the second of the three final rounds.
    The incident raises some troubling issues. Until now, critics have assailed competitions on artistic grounds, arguing that the process rewards technical polish at the expense of interpretive individuality. Now the integrity of the competition process itself must be called into question. The Tchaikovsky is, after all, one of the biggest international competitions, and the musicians who judge it also serve as jurors in other European and American contests. This is not, in other words, a problem that can be ascribed to corruption in the Soviet Union.
    It is also notable that when Mr. Gibb raised the matter, the jury refused to deal with it. The implication left in the film is that other jurors may have taken fees that could be interpreted as bribes. What would have happened, one wonders, if someone less scrupulous than Mr. Gibb had been approached? And who knows whether other contestants, or their eager relatives, pursued the same course, either at the Tchaikovsky or at other competitions, without anyone finding out?
    The competition went on, of course, despite the mounting rumors of misconduct. And as a counterpoint to its more troubling sides, the documentary includes a good deal of honest, energetic music making.
    Like other competition programs in recent years, the show uses fancy editing techniques to compress information, including the cutting of performances by several players into a single, seamless work. The point is to show as many of the musicians as possible, but the result invariably plays into the hands of critics who insist that today's competition players are virtually indistinguishable.
    The medal winners, not surprisingly, are given the most extensive hearings. Akiko Suwanai, the 18-year-old Japanese violinist who won the gold medal in the violin competition, is heard in a fairly electrifying account of the finale of the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto. And Boris Berezovsky, the 21-year-old Soviet pianist who won first prize, is heard in a movement from the Rachmaninoff Third Concerto and in fragments of solo works.

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  5. MOSCOW'S MUSICAL COMPETITION
    New York Times Review

    By JOHN J. O'CONNOR
    Published: December 3, 1986

    TONIGHT'S presentation of ''The Eighth International Tchaikovsky Competition'' on Channel 13 at 10 doesn't hold many surprises. The competition ended last summer, and it is no secret that the winners were Barry Douglas of Northern Ireland for piano and Raphael Oleg of France and Ilya Kaler of the Soviet Union in a tie for violin. And, as is not uncommon in such art ventures, the production reaches for sports analogies as it focuses on the intense training and pressures connected with what has been called ''the Olympics of music.'' We have been through this territory before, not least in the documentary that was done four years ago, ''The Seventh International Tchaikovsky Competition.''
    Nevertheless, as directed by Bill Fertik, this record of what are truly unusual proceedings does add up to compelling stuff. Mr. Fertik is perhaps best known for a film version of Ravel's ''Bolero'' that he did years ago. This new 90-minute documentary - co-produced by Robert Dalrymple and KCET in Los Angeles in association with Armand Hammer Productions - is another example of intelligent organization and pacing. Following several young performers through the grueling three rounds of the competition, spread over three and a half weeks, the film captures the intense emotions of the occasion while skillfully blending interviews with portions of performances.
    The competition is held in Moscow, and the public's interest does appear to be keen. Radio and television cover the proceedings. It is little wonder that, as Mr. Douglas notes, ''if you win, people sit up and take notice.'' The performers must face not only some 18 judges but also audiences who are clearly knowledgeable and committed. A couple of the most memorable moments in this film are the most painful: a violinist finishing his piece to what sounds like one hand clapping, and a pianist having to leave the stage after failing twice to get beyond the opening notes of his presentation.
    Old criticisms of the Soviet event and methods are rehashed. It is noted that a great majority of the judges are from the Soviet Union or Eastern bloc countries. One young Western performer delicately asks, ''Wouldn't you say the odds are somewhat against you?'' And then there is the argument about Western individualistic styles versus Eastern regimentation or homogenization. One American, on the side of self-expression, contends that ''if every note is perfect and it sounds like the sort of thing that, well, wins competitions, then it's not good enough.'' Another believes, for that same reason, that ''Glenn Gould and the young Horowitz would never get to the second round.''
    Significantly, it is Mr. Douglas, 26 years old, who refuses to buy that view, maintaining that skill and personality are ultimately inseparable. He observes that ''Russian pianists are so fantastic you have to be jolly good to beat them.'' And, of course, he goes on to demonstrate what he is talking about in his playing of Mussorgsky's ''Pictures at an Exhibition'' and Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1. Actually, Mr. Douglas contradicts the ''do or die'' breathlessness of the film. In the 1982 competition he didn't get past the first round. ''I went for the experience, so I wasn't really disappointed,'' he says. Four years later, he displays the strength and sensitivity that leave many in the audience talking about how, for a foreigner, ''Doog-lass'' is so ''attentive'' to the nuances of Russian music.
    Mr. Douglas would indeed appear to be jolly good. But then so do most of the others who have made it to this competition. The film captures quite vividly the heartbreak as well as the triumph.

    DIRECTOR WRITER Bill Fertik
    EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
    Ricki Franklin
    Kenneth Locker
    PRODUCER
    Robert Dalrymple
    ASSOCIATE PRODUCER
    Brian Bedol
    Jodi Nussbaum
    EXECUTIVE IN CHARGE OF PRODUCTION
    Phylis Geller
    PRODUCTION MANAGER
    Debra C. Horvath
    PRODUCTION COORDINATOR
    Edward Baranov
    Natalya Denisovskaya
    TECHNICAL SUPERVISOR
    Neville Horsfield
    EDITOR Brian Williams
    MUSIC Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky
    MUSIC PERFORMER
    Moscow Radio Orchestra
    SOUND
    Cleve Massey
    DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY
    Juan A. Barrera
    CAMERA
    Bill Schwarz
    Igo Chulpinov
    Konstantin Petrov

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