1. The Dean’s Office and The Forum at The Seattle School are excited to partner in offering the 3rd annual Stanley Grenz Lecture Series. This year’s events will feature Dr. Shelly Rambo, a constructive theologian and author of Spirit and Trauma: A Theology of Remaining. The discourse will focus on “Resurrection Wounds,” Rambo’s understanding of trauma and healing that goes far beyond the traditional ideas of redemptive suffering.

    In part two of this two-day lecture series, “Wounds Resurrecting,” Rambo will continue an exploration of the meaning of resurrection as viewed through a post-traumatic lens. This will include a conversation that ties together therapeutic insights and the biblical narratives to portray an image of the wounded-resurrected Jesus.

    Learn more about the Stanley Grenz Lecture Series: theseattleschool.edu/event/stanleygrenz-lecture-part1/?instance_id=28854

    Watch part 1 of this two part series: vimeo.com/146464773

    # vimeo.com/146464772 Uploaded
  2. The Dean’s Office and The Forum at The Seattle School are excited to partner in offering the 3rd annual Stanley Grenz Lecture Series. This year’s events will feature Dr. Shelly Rambo, a constructive theologian and author of Spirit and Trauma: A Theology of Remaining. The discourse will focus on “Resurrection Wounds,” Rambo’s understanding of trauma and healing that goes far beyond the traditional ideas of redemptive suffering.

    In part one of this two-day lecture series, “Wounds Surfacing,” Rambo will explore the meaning of resurrection as viewed through a post-traumatic lens. Working with therapeutic insights and the biblical narratives, the image of the wounded-resurrected Jesus offers a starting point for reflection. Rambo will invite us to think about how these wounds might be a more productive symbol within Christian faith by pointing not to the afterlife in a traditional sense, but to the present afterlife of trauma. Might we develop a theology of resurrecting wounds, and is there a testimony within the gospels that contributes something unique to the current discourse among the therapeutic disciplines?

    Learn more about the Stanley Grenz Lecture Series: theseattleschool.edu/event/stanleygrenz-lecture-part1/?instance_id=28854

    Watch part 2 of this two part series: vimeo.com/146464772

    # vimeo.com/146464773 Uploaded
  3. Making in the Middle: The Artist’s Role of Witnessing in the Middle Space
    Allyson Nicole Arendsee, MATC
    Theology, Imagination, & The Arts Track
    To expand the Church’s capacity for beauty, truth, and goodness asks for a transformation of life that sees through the lens of the shadow world of imagination rather than the familiar. The role of the artist is a prophetic witness of the middle space, of Holy Saturday, in the life of the Church. This space, seen through Shelly Rambo’s theology of trauma, witnesses to the movement of the Spirit working to grow something generative out of woundedness. Located in a postmodern context where the tenuousness of language is increasingly acknowledged, we are thirsting for a depth of meaning that can only be found in uncharted spaces, in the wilderness and wildness of the unknown. The role of the artist is that of the contemporary prophet. The artist is called to exist and persist in the wilderness, in the margins of theological discourse, calling out and framing our relationship to God through a glass darkly. This dangerous and fearful place is, as Richard Rohr states, “... when you have left the tried and true, but have not yet been able to replace it with anything else. It is when you are between your old comfort zone and any possible new answer. If you are not trained in how to hold anxiety, how to live with ambiguity, how to entrust and wait, you will run... anything to flee this terrible cloud of unknowing.” The artist acts as the prophet, informed and enflamed by the Spirit’s inspiration, mediating between the seen and unseen realms. The prophetic artist’s life in the church is lonely and alienating, and yet the hope is that in her pursuit of truth and meaning, there she would discover a community committed to receiving, supporting, risking, and remaining with the artist. In this way, the artist will be more fully able to live into her call as one who receives from, responds to, and creates with and through the Holy Spirit.

    ABOUT INTEGRATIVE PROJECTS

    The Integrative Project serves as a capstone for students in The Seattle School's Master of Divinity and MA in Theology & Culture programs as they look back on their training while discerning what it will look like for them to serve God and neighbor in their post-graduate contexts.

    Students work with a faculty advisor to form a project that integrates the student’s passions and calling. Their integrative projects are thus born out of years of study, countless conversations with faculty, a lifetime of story, and each student’s distinctive embodiment of text, soul, and culture.

    Presentations synthesize the project’s thesis while incorporating the student’s experience and research in their journey toward their completed work. Final drafts of each integrative project will be available in The Seattle School’s library after the candidate’s graduation.

    Learn more about our Master of Divinity and MA in Theology & Culture programs: theseattleschool.edu/our-programs

    # vimeo.com/138360788 Uploaded
  4. How Does Living Out the Great Commandment Inform the Way We Do Church in the 21st Century
    Clinton Rowan Wilson, MATC

    The future of Christianity in the 21st century seems very uncertain. If people who identify as Christians are to continue gathering as a faith tradition that seeks to follow in the way of Jesus, then Christians must be people who are committed to living out the radical grace filled love of God, self and neighbor that Jesus invited us to live.1 In this project I will attempt to respond to the fragmented and divided condition that is inhibiting Christians in the 21st century from thriving as one universal body that is actively living as the incarnated love of Christ on this planet.2 In the first section, I will begin by looking at each person’s unique contribution and individual responsibility to live out these commands. From this discussion I will consider what each individual church community has to offer the greater community of followers of Jesus, and how ecumenism can lead to a Synergy that will support a more united and thriving universal Christian community in the 21st century. In the second section I will present six examples of churches and communities that I have participated in over the past 20 years and how each of them offers a unique but necessary contribution toward my desire of what a church community could be. In section 3 I will offer some relevant questions that I think faith communities must ask if they are going to participate as a viable expression of the love of God to the people inside and outside of their meeting space walls. I also offer some brief snapshots of what forms those viable expressions could take. Finally, I will present a business model of what a culturally engaging church in the 21st century could look like.
    1 Matthew 22:36-40 2 Romans 12:4-5

    ABOUT INTEGRATIVE PROJECTS

    The Integrative Project serves as a capstone for students in The Seattle School's Master of Divinity and MA in Theology & Culture programs as they look back on their training while discerning what it will look like for them to serve God and neighbor in their post-graduate contexts.

    Students work with a faculty advisor to form a project that integrates the student’s passions and calling. Their integrative projects are thus born out of years of study, countless conversations with faculty, a lifetime of story, and each student’s distinctive embodiment of text, soul, and culture.

    Presentations synthesize the project’s thesis while incorporating the student’s experience and research in their journey toward their completed work. Final drafts of each integrative project will be available in The Seattle School’s library after the candidate’s graduation.

    Learn more about our Master of Divinity and MA in Theology & Culture programs: theseattleschool.edu/our-programs

    # vimeo.com/138360791 Uploaded
  5. Radical Theology and Christian Hospitality
    Gary David Darakjian, MATC

    In an increasingly globalized world in which clashes, ideological and physical, occur all too frequently, the need to recapture an imagination for hospitality is as important as it has ever been. As Western culture continues its steady march of influence into the remotest corners of the world, propagating a worldview that holds meaning as arbitrary and economic gain as life’s highest pursuit, the still small voice of radical hospitality rings out, yearning to be heard amid the shouting matches that fill our ears. It is this subversive call to openness that characterizes radical theology, a call to embrace weakness, uncertainty, and impossibility, that God’s insistence might bear on humanity’s existence, spurring us on to acts of hospitality, seeking to turn enemies into friends. Radical theology is not just another theology in which claims are made and beliefs confessed. It is rather a spectral way of doing theology, haunting the absolute certainties that cause division and wars, often in the name of God. Admittedly, radical theology is the project of academics who draw on various postmodern philosophies, articulating ideals that find little manifestation in the realities of this world. And so radical theology must find its roots if it is to bear any fruit. Christian hospitality provides the necessary ground and nutrients for radical theology to flourish so that radical theology, rooted and strengthened by Christian hospitality, can more truly bring hospitality to bear in the world. In other words, while Christian hospitality allows for the expression of radical theology, radical theology provokes Christian hospitality to be true to its own radical call. As an integration between ancient practices and postmodern understandings of truth, the interplay of radical theology and Christian hospitality carries the potential to welcome the kingdom of God on earth as it is in heaven.

    ABOUT INTEGRATIVE PROJECTS

    The Integrative Project serves as a capstone for students in The Seattle School's Master of Divinity and MA in Theology & Culture programs as they look back on their training while discerning what it will look like for them to serve God and neighbor in their post-graduate contexts.

    Students work with a faculty advisor to form a project that integrates the student’s passions and calling. Their integrative projects are thus born out of years of study, countless conversations with faculty, a lifetime of story, and each student’s distinctive embodiment of text, soul, and culture.

    Presentations synthesize the project’s thesis while incorporating the student’s experience and research in their journey toward their completed work. Final drafts of each integrative project will be available in The Seattle School’s library after the candidate’s graduation.

    Learn more about our Master of Divinity and MA in Theology & Culture programs: theseattleschool.edu/our-programs

    # vimeo.com/138360792 Uploaded

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