1. In this talk the Open Banking Working Group team discuss their work to improve bank services for consumers, businesses and society by making better use of data from across the spectrum.

    They have been tasked with delivering a framework for an open API standard in UK banking by the end of the year. This will highlight how customers can have more control over their data, and how to create an environment that supports creating value from its usage. The team want to hear views from the audience so come armed with questions and ideas!

    About our Friday lunchtime lectures
    With a broad range of topics in open data such as tracking government expenditure, British landscape mapping and creating art, there’s bound to be something that interests you.

    The sessions run from 1pm to 1.45pm weekly during UK school term-times, with informal networking until 2pm. Each lecture lasts for around 20 minutes, leaving time for questions afterwards. The lectures don’t require any specialist knowledge, but are focused around communicating the meaning and impact of open data in all areas of life.

    Each week the lectures are streamed live on YouTube and then uploaded to our YouTube and Vimeo channels. You can also download the Friday lunchtime lectures as a podcast on iTunes.

    youtube.com/user/OpenDataInstituteUK
    vimeo.com/theodiuk

    You can follow the lectures and contribute to the discussion using #ODIFridays on Twitter.

    # vimeo.com/147850293 Uploaded 329 Plays 0 Comments
  2. In February 2015 the UK government launched Contracts Finder, a portal that advertises open government-spending contract opportunities, allowing companies to easily and quickly bid for them. The UK spends £250 billion every year on public spending contracts, including vital public services like the NHS and it’s important that this money is spent as efficiently as possible.

    As part of an ASI fellowship, William Jones worked in collaboration with the UK Cabinet Office to increase the number of companies bidding on these contracts. He did this by automatically recommending them contracts which are available and relevant, using publicly accessible information from UK companies. The web application William built is called Contracts Recommender. His talk will explain the public sources of information he uses as well as how Contracts Recommender works.

    William Jones was recently awarded the MPhil in Advanced Computer Science from the Cambridge Computer Laboratory with Distinction. During the ASI fellowship he first worked on a deep learning image classification project with Tractable.io, using the convolutional neural network framework Caffe. Following this he joined a project with the Cabinet Office using natural language processing to automatically recommend relevant government procurement contracts to companies in the UK. He has just started a PhD in Mathematical Genomics at Cambridge.

    About our Friday lunchtime lectures
    With a broad range of topics in open data such as tracking government expenditure, British landscape mapping and creating art, there’s bound to be something that interests you.
    The sessions run from 1pm to 1.45pm weekly during UK school term-times, with informal networking until 2pm. Each lecture lasts for around 20 minutes, leaving time for questions afterwards. The lectures don’t require any specialist knowledge, but are focused around communicating the meaning and impact of open data in all areas of life.
    To learn more visit our website - theodi.org/lunchtime-lectures
    you can also follow the lectures and contribute to the discussion using #ODIFridays on Twitter.

    # vimeo.com/147110406 Uploaded 33 Plays 0 Comments
  3. Are physical and data infrastructures distinct? In this talk, Georgina Voss and Wesley Goatley will present and discuss their infrastructure data artwork “Familiars”, which directly intercepted logistical Familiars broadcast by planes, ships, and trains, highlighting the material aspects of data infrastructures. In unpacking the research and development behind “Familiars”, they’ll explore how access to forms of “open” data is mediated and who this data is really intended for. While the UK government is currently investing in the “best” ways to plan, create, and fund vital infrastructure projects, they’ll argue that engaging with crucial questions around control, ownership and access to data requires an understanding of their physical components and context.

    Wesley Goatley is an artist and researcher.

    Georgina Voss is a technology anthropologist, writer, and co-founder of research co-operative “Strange Telemetry”.

    About our Friday lunchtime lectures
    With a broad range of topics in open data such as tracking government expenditure, British landscape mapping and creating art, there’s bound to be something that interests you.

    The sessions run from 1pm to 1.45pm weekly during UK school term-times, with informal networking until 2pm. Each lecture lasts for around 20 minutes, leaving time for questions afterwards. The lectures don’t require any specialist knowledge, but are focused around communicating the meaning and impact of open data in all areas of life.

    To learn more visit our website - theodi.org/lunchtime-lectures

    you can also follow the lectures and contribute to the discussion using #ODIFridays on Twitter.

    # vimeo.com/146646840 Uploaded 9 Plays 0 Comments
  4. There’s lots of open data on local areas about, but it’s in hundreds of datasets in hundreds of places and hundreds of formats. So where should you begin?

    The Local Government Association (LGA) has developed LG Inform, an online data service to bring lots of this data together. Working with Porism, they have developed an API for developers and others to present the data in a variety of ways for wide audiences.

    Juliet Whitworth, research and information manager at the LGA, and Mike Thacker, founder of Porism, will take you through what’s possible, give a demo and answer your questions.

    You can view the slides to this talk here:
    scribd.com/doc/281808631/Friday-Lunchtime-Lecture-What-s-api-ning-in-your-local-area-Revealing-places-with-open-data

    Our videos: http://bit.ly/odi_vimeo
    Our photos: http://bit.ly/odi_flickr
    Our audio: http://bit.ly/odi_soundcloud
    Our slides: http://bit.ly/odi_scribd
    Our tweets: http://bit.ly/ODIHQ_tweets
    Our website: theodi.org
    ODI Summit videos: http://bit.ly/odisummit_video
    What is open data?: http://bit.ly/what-is-open-data

    # vimeo.com/139714712 Uploaded 56 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Grantmakers and charities generate large amounts of data through the course of their work. If this data could be shared and compared easily it could be useful to many other organisations, including other charities, NGOs and funders, enabling better use of resources by everyone.

    Alice Casey from 360Giving and Tim Davies will explain how things work in practice and how people can get involved either as publishers, data users or contributors to the standard.

    Tim Davies is an independent consultant & action-researcher based in Oxford, UK, and since October 2011, a PhD Student in Web Science and Social Policy with the University of Southampton.

    The slides to this talk will soon be available on the ODI website and the ODI Scribd account.

    Our videos: http://bit.ly/odi_vimeo
    Our photos: http://bit.ly/odi_flickr
    Our audio: http://bit.ly/odi_soundcloud
    Our slides: http://bit.ly/odi_scribd
    Our tweets: http://bit.ly/ODIHQ_tweets
    Our website: theodi.org
    ODI Summit videos: http://bit.ly/odisummit_video
    What is open data?: http://bit.ly/what-is-open-data

    # vimeo.com/139685459 Uploaded 50 Plays 0 Comments

ODI Friday lunchtime lecture series

Open Data Institute PRO

Friday Lunchtime Lectures are for everyone and free to attend. You bring your lunch, we provide tea & coffee, an interesting talk, and enough time to get back to your desk.

They run from 1pm-1.45pm, with informal networking until 2pm, weekly during…


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Friday Lunchtime Lectures are for everyone and free to attend. You bring your lunch, we provide tea & coffee, an interesting talk, and enough time to get back to your desk.

They run from 1pm-1.45pm, with informal networking until 2pm, weekly during UK school term times. The lecture is about 20 mins followed by time for questions and friendly discussion. The lectures do not require any specialist knowledge, and are about communicating the meaning and impact of open data for everyday life, to tell stories.

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