1. Want to know how the Universe works? How stars are made? How celestial objects live their lives? The best place to find answers to these questions is the Milky Way. Being so close, we can study the Milky Way in great detail and apply the lessons we learn to the rest of the Universe. Dr Naomi McClure-Griffiths has done just that, conducting a massive survey of all the hydrogen gas in and around the Milky Way as viewed from the southern hemisphere. The survey showed that the Milky Way is more frothy and bubbly than was previously thought – just like the head on a glass of beer.

    This research was carried out as part of the Office of the Chief Executive (OCE) Science Leader program.

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  2. Despite originally wanting to study engineering, Dr Linfa Wang became a biologist. His investigations are shedding light on how bats respond differently to viral infections to other mammals. Somehow bats infected with lethal viruses like Hendra experience no harmful effects. Bats seem to be the origin of a number of viral diseases that are a biosecurity threat to humans. Dr Wang’s work is identifying ways to prevent this threat by providing early warning of potential outbreaks, and strategies to save lives.

    This research was carried out as part of the Office of the Chief Executive (OCE) Science Leader program.

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  3. A visit to the bare white hills of tailings from a mine site inspired Dr Miao Chen to think about environmentally friendly ways of extracting metals from ores. She works with naturally occurring micro-organisms which digest mineral ores, leaching metals in a process which saves water and energy. She and her team have also developed solid-state sensors for use in streamlining mining processes, and also for environmental monitoring.

    This research was carried out as part of the Office of the Chief Executive (OCE) Science Leader program.

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  4. areas. Water forecasting helps predict water availability, enabling better management of responses to floods and drought conditions. QJ Wang and his colleagues create mathematical models which forecast floods and river flows. These models are available on the Australian Bureau of Meteorology website.

    This research was carried out as part of the Office of the Chief Executive (OCE) Science Leader program.

    # vimeo.com/116224470 Uploaded 18 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Dr Beth Fulton has loved the ocean since she watched dolphins playing in the surf as a child. Now she leads a team creating computer models of marine ecosystems, and describes mapping complex ecosystems as like putting together a jigsaw puzzle. Her team’s computer models are used world-wide in sustainable fisheries management, and Beth sees them as essential to strategic planning in managing resources – and coping with climate change and conservation issues.

    This research was carried out as part of the Office of the Chief Executive (OCE) Science Leader program.

    # vimeo.com/116224471 Uploaded 16 Plays 0 Comments

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