1. Professor of K.O.O.L. Cecil R. Carter and poet Catherine Lee trained 5 San Antonio, Texas-based poets how to communicate with musicians. This “stArt Playing Poetricity Workshop” occurred between January-April 2015, made possible with support from the City of San Antonio’s Department for Culture and Creative Development. (JPW-010615-02) During Orientation, Part 2, the following skills were taught:
    F. Pitch and Overtone Series
    0:00 Overtones of the pitch. Cecil demonstrates various overtones of the pitch B, then plays chords that have a different characteristic depending on which notes support them.
    G. Counting off plus subdividing a beat in order to fit words to a form (III)
    2:17 “Thank you for watching this video free sample” exercise in counting off and fitting a phrase to 4 beats of 12. Fernando tries the exercise but can’t get started. Cecil reiterates counting off without saying or snapping every beat, then claps on 3. He delegates Veronica to count off for Fernando. ...
    H. A Conductor Uses Ictus Points
    I. Multiple Events Can Happen On One Pulse
    J. Counting off plus subdividing a beat in order to fit words to a form (IV)
    K. What is Jazz?
    L. Fitting Words into a 12-Bar Blues Music Form
    The full curriculum is available from Cecil Carter. Contact Professor of KOOL@gmail.com

    # vimeo.com/116320907 Uploaded
  2. Professor of K.O.O.L. Cecil R. Carter and poet Catherine Lee trained 5 San Antonio, Texas-based poets how to communicate with musicians. This “stArt Playing Poetricity Workshop” occurred between January-April 2015, made possible with support from the City of San Antonio’s Department for Culture and Creative Development. (JPW-010615-03) During Orientation, Part 3, the following skills were taught:

    M. Fitting Words into a 12-Bar Blues Music Form (II)
    0:00 Blues played through for several choruses; learn to recognize the form. A good segment with which to practice reading. Cecil continue playing the blues and explains what he’s playing, modal interchange of chords. He plays through a number of choruses in an attempt to get the poets to familiarize themselves with 12-bar blues form.
    N. Poet Functions as Bandleader
    4:59 Discussion about how to communicate what music you’d like to accompany your poem. Cecil asks how poets would tell musicians what they want to hear. He has several ways in mind. Cat adds a third. Cecil explains what musicians hear among themselves and the leadership qualities they expect to hear from the poet/vocalist.
    O. What is Jazz? (II)
    13:18 Cecil uses the example of Buddy Bolden improvising when he should have been using his 1st trumpet to lead the marching band. Jazz elaborates elements that are already there.

    The full curriculum is available from Cecil Carter. Contact Professor of KOOL@gmail.com

    # vimeo.com/116400303 Uploaded
  3. Professor of K.O.O.L. Cecil R. Carter and poet Catherine Lee trained 5 San Antonio, Texas-based poets how to communicate with musicians. This “stArt Playing Poetricity Workshop” occurred between January-April 2015, made possible with support from the City of San Antonio’s Department for Culture and Creative Development. (JPW-011315-01) During Team A Classroom Sessions in January 2015, poets Fernando and Ed, and co-trainer Cat, worked with an assignment to write a poem to fit a 12-bar blues. Session 1 prepared them to read the poem with musical accompaniment by reviewing the following skills:
    A. Hearing the beats in a measure
    0:39 Snap on beat 2, later both 2 and 4. Using 90 BPM as a basis, Cecil begins by saying “one” for us to hear implied and snap on beat 2 without the metronome’s help. We are then supposed to snap on 4 as well as 2. We have difficulty but eventually get it.
    4:53 Cecil says “beer” instead of “one” to indicate that it’s a matter of snapping on the next beat in the cadence after something, anything is said.
    B. Hearing subdivisions of a single beat in a measure
    5:56 Snap on beat 2 & 4 with complexity of subdivisions of beat added. “Nachos” a two-syllable word suggested by Ed requires different handling. It represents the subdivision of one beat. Cecil plays subdivisions of one on trumpet while we all snap on 2 and 4. Explains what he’s done and that we did it correctly.
    10:37 Snap on beat 2 & 4 with complexity of a melody added. ...
    C. Counting off the band
    D. Strategies for working with the band in real time
    The full curriculum is available from Cecil Carter. Contact ProfessorofKOOL@gmail.com

    # vimeo.com/117025002 Uploaded
  4. Professor of K.O.O.L. Cecil R. Carter and poet Catherine Lee trained 5 San Antonio, Texas-based poets how to communicate with musicians. This “stArt Playing Poetricity Workshop” occurred between January-April 2015, made possible with support from the City of San Antonio’s Department for Culture and Creative Development. (JPW-011315-02) During Team A Classroom Sessions in January 2015, poets Fernando and Ed, and co-trainer Cat, worked with an assignment to write a poem to fit a 12-bar blues. In Session 1, Cecil coached the poets how to count off and read with musicians in an entertaining way. Participants each wrote a new poem on the topic, “Charlie, from circus monkey to Academy Award winner,” fitting it to 12-bar blues musical form. Cecil supplied an audio file to each poet to use in completing the assignment. The following skills were taught:
    E. Fitting Words into a 12-Bar Blues Music Form (III)
    0:23 For this assignment, the first 12 bars are reserved for an improvised introduction, the poem itself starts on the 2nd chorus of 12 bars and lasts 3 choruses. Cat counts Cecil off and reads for the first time the poem, “Modern Monkey Business,” she wrote to fit the form of a 12-bar blues that he plays on keyboard. Cecil is playing live the same blues that he distributed as a recording to write and practice with.
    3:57 Ed reads his poem, “Mama’s Hairy Little Baby,” while Cecil plays the blues. Ed starts his poem before the first chorus of 12-bars was through. That causes him to finish his poem somewhat early so Cecil finishes the piece on keyboard.
    6:08 Cecil explains what happened when Ed read, that he started on the turnaround of the first chorus. Cecil plays it again to let Ed hear these parts of the blues structure, and gives strategies for doing it differently another time.
    8:17 Fernando counts Cecil off and reads his poem “Good Time Charlie,” faster than the metronome was set.
    10:41 Cecil gives feedback to Fernando about starting fast, and to everybody.
    The full curriculum is available from Cecil Carter. Contact Professor of KOOL@gmail.com

    # vimeo.com/117038057 Uploaded
  5. Professor of K.O.O.L. Cecil R. Carter and poet Catherine Lee trained 5 San Antonio, Texas-based poets how to communicate with musicians. This “stArt Playing Poetricity Workshop” occurred between January-April 2015, made possible with support from the City of San Antonio’s Department for Culture and Creative Development. (Jazz Band-012015-01) During Team A Classroom Sessions in January 2015, poets Fernando and Ed, and co-trainer Cat, worked with an assignment to write a poem to fit a 12-bar blues, on the topic, “Charlie, from circus monkey to Academy Award winner.” Cecil supplied an audio file to each poet to use in completing the assignment. During Session 2 Cecil coached the poets how to improve their performances and interactions with musicians by reviewing the following skills:
    F. Fitting Words into a 12-Bar Blues Music Form (IV)
    0:40 Cat reads her “Modern Monkey Business” poem while Cecil plays blues at the tempo she counted off. Cecil gives feedback, says she counted off a little faster than the 90 BPM.
    3:49 The tune form is stable, jazz poetry words dance within and need to breathe. Cat explains that she had one more chorus, a reprise of the first chorus. She structured her poem so that stanzas correspond to choruses of the 12-bar blues, as a singer would. This reminds Cecil of music students who learn how to play exactly as the tune is written but don’t deviate from how others have played it. Cecil suggests that a more mature style of reading would be taking more liberty to float phrases within the form.
    7:59 Learning how to create space between the meter of the music and the phrasing of the words. Ed interprets what Cecil has just explained, that the challenge for Ed is to hear the music at all, but her challenge is to let go of what she already hears to accept what Cecil is trying to teach. Cecil clarifies himself as well.
    G. Counting off, further instructions
    11:32 The leader/poet’s emphasis on “one” sets up the band’s ambiance. (I) Cecil says that the band’s energy follows the energy set up by the poet; if the count-off is flat instead of enthusiastic, they will not play as well.
    H. Choosing a tempo
    12:31 Be aware of the tempo you are counting off. Cecil explains & clarifies working with the form. Says how to adjust if count off too fast. If you realize you’ve counted off too fast, superimpose a slower reading within the faster tempo. He reviews how poets worked with tempo during the Orientation exercise. (JPW-010615-02.mp4 / vimeo.com/116320907 at 26:07)
    15:59 Deciding what tempo to read the poem. Cecil asks Cat “Give me more space, and count me off like you want the band to sound.” Cat tries to explain that she can’t mentally hear 90 BPM, she wasn’t trying to count 90 BPM off, she counted off and read to what she thought was a comfortable speed, despite Cecil’s judgment that it was too fast. James comments from behind the camera on what he sees of the misunderstanding between Cecil and Cat about counting too fast.
    21:25 Cecil explains why counting off slower is more effective. Cat tries to count off slower, and does. However, her attempt at enthusiastic emphasis is not what Cecil wanted to hear.
    23:27 Cecil corrects Cat for having speeded up the 4th beat in her attempt to add emphasis. Cecil explains about eighth notes, and corrects Cat’s soft bland delivery.
    The full curriculum is available from Cecil Carter. Contact Professor of KOOL@gmail.com

    # vimeo.com/117752215 Uploaded

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