1. Citizens Against Longwall Mining share stories of their struggle to stop the development of a new coal mine within the city limits of their small central Illinois community of Hillsboro. Longwall mining and its “planned subsidence” threatens over 5000 acres of nearby farmland. Residents express their frustration over what they feel has been an unfair permitting process and voice their concerns over the loss of prime farmland, altered drainage patterns and the displacement of farm residences. An 88-foot tall, above-ground impoundment covers over one square mile and holds hundreds of millions of gallons of toxic coal slurry, a by-product of coal washing. With the mine officially open for less than three years, plans are already underway for the construction of a second coal slurry pond on the site.

    # vimeo.com/86381386 Uploaded 104 Plays 0 Comments
  2. On February 19, 2014, the residents of the small central Illinois town of Hillsboro came to a pubic hearing to challenge the Department of Natural Resources over its renewal of a permit to mine coal within their city's limits. With adjacent lands already subsiding, residents of Hillsboro asked why the hydrological analysis for the original permit did not include the full mining area; why affected farmland did not have to be restored to full productive potential; and why the community would be left with the toxic legacy of two giant coal slurry ponds after the mine operators leave. After five years, the citizens' request for an administrative hearing challenging the original permit remains unanswered, yet the permit renewal process proceeds.

    # vimeo.com/87821783 Uploaded 363 Plays 0 Comments
  3. Coal ash is the second largest industrial waste stream in the U.S. It contains toxic metals such as mercury, lead, arsenic, cadmium and selenium, yet in Illinois it is less regulated than household waste. Illinois has over 90 coal ash disposal sites. Only 38 are lined. All studied so far, have been shown to be leaking into the groundwater. On May 14 and 15, 2014, the public will have the opportunity to ask the Illinois Pollution Control Board to adopt strict regulations to control coal ash disposal. This video shows why people should be vocal about this issue.

    # vimeo.com/91808084 Uploaded 494 Plays 0 Comments
  4. The Dynegy coal-fired power plant, located in Vermilion County, Illinois, closed in 2011 leaving behind three large ash pits containing millions of gallons of coal combustion waste laced with toxic heavy metals and carcinogens, the result of years of burning coal. All three pits are located in the floodplain; two of the pits are unlined and actively leaching into underlying groundwater. As state and federal agencies weigh new rules and regulations for the closure of coal ash ponds, Vermilion County residents and local experts raise their concerns about the possibility of a disaster similar to those that have occurred in Tennessee and North Carolina, where coal ash ponds have burst, sending tons of toxic sludge downstream.

    # vimeo.com/103383023 Uploaded 809 Plays 3 Comments

Eco-Justice Collaborative

Eco-Justice Collaborative PRO

Highlights from the work of Eco-Justice Collaborative a central Illinois non-profit created to raise public awareness of the impact of lifestyle choices and public policy on the planet and its people and to encourage changes that will heal and restore…


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Highlights from the work of Eco-Justice Collaborative a central Illinois non-profit created to raise public awareness of the impact of lifestyle choices and public policy on the planet and its people and to encourage changes that will heal and restore the planet, while bringing about a more just and sustainable world.

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