1. This is one of a suite of five short, silent videos that focus on an object or architectural element on view in the first-floor period rooms of the Huntington Art Gallery. Each video is installed on iPads in the room where the object is on view. View the full suite here: Huntington Art Gallery: Period Rooms Suite

    This video focuses on the front of the mantel clock on view in the Small Drawing Room. Another video in this suite focuses on the clock’s back.

    This clock, the most significant one in The Huntington’s collection, has an esteemed pedigree. It was made for Prince Maximilian of Hapsburg, the last elector and archbishop of Cologne, who is depicted in the upper medallion wearing ermine-trimmed robes. As brother to Marie-Antoinette of France, Maximilian developed a taste for Parisian luxury goods, particularly porcelain-mounted objects like this clock. Bought by Henry Huntington more than a century later, the clock became a most suitable addition to the memorial collection he formed in honor of his wife Arabella, a devotee of the ill-fated queen.

    Several other versions of this clock were produced, each with slight differences. The variations between the clocks result from their production within the guild system of 18th-century France, which dictated what craftspeople were permitted to make. A clockmaker, for example, was permitted to make one thing only—the movement that ran the clock. The clock’s decorations—from the gilt-bronze figures to the porcelain plaques—were made in several different workshops led by different masters. All of the clock’s parts were brought together for assembly in the shop of a clock merchant, called a “marchand-mercier.”

    # vimeo.com/122342011 Uploaded
  2. This is one of a suite of five short, silent videos that focus on an object or architectural element on view in the first-floor period rooms of the Huntington Art Gallery. Each video is installed on iPads in the room where the object is on view. View the full suite here: Huntington Art Gallery: Period Rooms Suite

    This video focuses on the back of the mantel clock on view in the Small Drawing Room. Another video in this suite focuses on the clock’s front.

    The clock, the most significant one in The Huntington’s collection, has an esteemed pedigree. It was made for Prince Maximilian of Hapsburg, the last elector and archbishop of Cologne, who is depicted in the upper medallion wearing ermine-trimmed robes. As brother to Marie-Antoinette of France, Maximilian developed a taste for Parisian luxury goods, particularly porcelain-mounted objects like this clock. Bought by Henry Huntington more than a century later, the clock became a suitable addition to the memorial collection he formed in honor of his wife Arabella, a devotee of the ill-fated queen.

    Several other versions of this clock were produced, each with slight differences. The variations between the clocks result from their production within the guild system of 18th-century France, which dictated what craftspeople were permitted to make. A clockmaker, for example, was permitted to make one thing only—the movement that ran the clock. The clock’s decorations—from the gilt-bronze figures to the porcelain plaques—were made in several different workshops led by different masters. All of the clock’s parts were brought together for assembly in the shop of a clock merchant, called a “marchand-mercier.”

    # vimeo.com/122341947 Uploaded
  3. This is one of a suite of five short, silent videos that focus on an object or architectural element on view in the first-floor period rooms of the Huntington Art Gallery. Each video is installed on iPads in the room where the object is on view. View the full suite here: Huntington Art Gallery: Period Rooms Suite

    This video focuses on the wall paneling (“boiserie”) of the Large Drawing Room.

    Based on French prototypes, the paneling in this room includes narrow vertical panels with 11 carved baskets of daffodils, roses, hyacinths, and other flowers. Toward the top of these panels, bunches of items bound by ribbons—called trophies—represent various allegories of elegant diversions, such as music (tambourine, maracas, violin, lyre), theater (mask), painting (palette, paintbrushes, mahl stick), and love (bow and arrows). Some may have been copied without thought to their meaning, such as the trophy with a cinerary urn and torch, representing death, and the bagpipe and jester’s rattle signifying folly.

    # vimeo.com/122341747 Uploaded
  4. This is one of a suite of five short, silent videos that focus on an object or architectural element on view in the first-floor period rooms of the Huntington Art Gallery. Each video is installed on iPads in the room where the object is on view. View the full suite here: Huntington Art Gallery: Period Rooms Suite

    This video focuses on the mechanical writing table on view in the Large Library. The stopmotion animation shows the table opening up and then closing again.

    This writing table opens by means of an elaborate mechanism that simultaneously propels the top surface backward and a large drawer forward. A button, disguised to resemble a portion of one of the gilt-bronze mounts, releases the center drawer, allowing it to be pushed forward by two steel springs. Mechanical tables catered to a sophisticated clientele fascinated by curiosities and the latest gadgetry. The form of this desk is similar to that of a group of “bureau-toilettes” (writing/dressing tables) made by Jean-François Oeben for Madame de Pompadour, mistress of King Louis XV.

    # vimeo.com/122341746 Uploaded
  5. This is one of a suite of five short, silent videos that focus on an object or architectural element on view in the first-floor period rooms of the Huntington Art Gallery. Each video is installed on iPads in the room where the object is on view. View the full suite here: Huntington Art Gallery: Period Rooms Suite

    This video looks at the chimneypiece in the Dining Room.

    In elegant houses, the chimneypiece served as a room’s decorative focal point and was often carved with fashionable ornament. The carving on this example celebrates wine and the revelry that accompanies its consumption. Heads of satyrs, from whose mouths issue garlands of fruit, appear on the jambs while wine vessels and swags of grapevines flank the central panel, which shows a procession of young bacchanalian figures, one of whom pours wine down the mouth of a goat.

    The Huntington chimneypiece originates from the Georgian house at No. 17 Hanover Square, London, which served, from 1781, as the home of Dorothea Jordan (1761–1816), a famous actress and mistress of the future King William IV, while he was Duke of Clarence. In 1863, the house became the quarters of The Arts Club, whose members included Charles Dickens and Mark Twain. The club moved in 1896, and the house was demolished.

    # vimeo.com/122342094 Uploaded

Huntington Art Gallery: Period Rooms Suite

The Huntington PRO

Each of the five short, silent videos in this suite focuses on an object or architectural element on view in the first-floor period rooms of the Huntington Art Gallery. Each is installed on iPads in the room where the object is on view.

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