1. Stephen Murphy (stephen-murphy.com) and I (edmooredop.com) spent a day at leading UK lighting company Panalux testing every type of lighting diffusion material we could find.

    These are the video results of the tests but you see lighting diagrams and notes at stephenmurphydop.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/diffusion-bounce-rag-tests.html and high res stills at edmooredop.com/ragstest/.

    # vimeo.com/39856572 Uploaded 23K Plays 19 Comments
  2. Edgar Wright explores the art of close-ups with David Chen from slashfilm.com and davechen.net. Be sure to buy Edgar Wright's newest film, "At World's End" on Blu-Ray and VOD:

    amazon.com/The-Worlds-Blu-ray-Digital-UltraViolet/dp/B00BPEJX12

    Thanks for watching! Here are a few more details on the making of this video essay: davechen.net/2014/02/the-making-of-that-close-ups-video-essay.html
    A few other videos I've made:
    Inside the Largest Video Store in the World
    vimeo.com/81502507
    Explaining Darren Aronofsky's The Fountain:
    vimeo.com/80770717
    One Year in The Life of David Chen
    vimeo.com/68020590

    # vimeo.com/85311313 Uploaded 140K Plays 23 Comments
  3. A test of the FUJI Reala 500D (8692) done within the framework of a course at the ENS Louis Lumière (http://www.ens-louis-lumiere.fr/).

    Several tests were done:

    1) Determining the EI (exposure index) of the film. Normally, the EI of a film should be equal to the EI indicated by the producer (FUJI Eterna 250T should have an EI of 250 and FUJI Reala 500D should have an EI of 500). However, this is not always the case. Causes for differences can be: aging of the film stock, the lab that doesn't develop the film according to the producer's recommendations, special treatments of the film, etc.

    Result: In our case, we found an EI of 250. The reason for this non-negligible difference (1 stop less fast) is probably the age of the film stock we used, because the colors are not very well reproduced in the blacks (there is a brownish-green tint)

    2) We made a bracketing from -5 stops up to +4 stops. This test allowed us to see how far we could go in under exposure and over exposure.

    Result: a face is still detectable at -3 stops. Overexposure is not really a problem, since there is no real loss in detail and it's quite easy to down-grade the image (a high-quality 2K DPX scan was performed that contained all the information on the film). Theoretically one can over-expose a film stock infinitely without loosing information - therefore, the main concern is in underexposure.

    3) We also made a contrast test, to see different types of contrasts on a face. This helped us to make a choice of what type of style we wanted to give to the image of the film.

    4) Finally, we also made some tests with different filters. We tried a polarising filter (notice how the reflections of the sky in the windows in the background disappear and how the shadows in the trees get less dense). We also tried a low-contrast filter and two different fog filters.

    ----
    The images were not color-graded. The images here are those directly received from the lab. It's not 2K DPX quality either, because one can't stream that quality on the Internet - for the moment being ...

    # vimeo.com/29230640 Uploaded 1,640 Plays 0 Comments
  4. A test of the KODAK Vision2 200T (7217) done within the framework of a course at the ENS Louis Lumière (http://www.ens-louis-lumiere.fr/).

    Several tests were done:

    1) Determining the EI (exposure index) of the film. Normally, the EI of a film should be equal to the EI indicated by the producer (Kodak Vision3 500T should have an EI of 500 and Kodak Vision2 200T an EI of 200 for instance). However, this is not always the case. Causes for differences can be: aging of the film stock, the lab that doesn't develop the film according to the producer's recommendations, special treatments of the film, etc.

    Result: In our case, we found an EI of 200. The Vision2 200T developed by Arane Gulliver (http://www.aranelab.com/) performs according to expectations.

    2) We made a bracketing from -5 stops up to +5 stops. This test allowed us to see how far we could go in under exposure and over exposure.

    Result: a face is still recognisable at -4 stops and there is still some detail in the whites. Overexposure is not really a problem, since there is no real loss in detail and it's quite easy to down-grade the image (a high-quality 2K DPX scan was performed that contained all the information on the film). Theoretically one can over-expose a film stock infinitely without loosing information - therefore, the main concern is in underexposure.

    3) We also made a contrast test, to see different types of contrasts on a face. This helped us to make a choice of what type of style we wanted to give to the image of the film.

    4) Finally, we also used two standard color correction filters (CTB: conversion to blue; CTO: conversion to orange) and applied different intensities to see the effect.

    Results: even the use of strong filters (such as a Full CTB) does not affect strongly the look of the image.

    ----
    The images were not color-graded. The images here are those directly received from the lab. It's not 2K DPX quality either, because one can't stream that quality on the Internet - for the moment being ...

    # vimeo.com/30244131 Uploaded 1,888 Plays 0 Comments
  5. A screencast showing how I use PluralEyes and Premiere Pro CS5 to create a 2 DSLR multicam sequence.

    For more info please visit my blog http://www.pauljoy.com/workflow/premiere-pro/multicam-edits-in-premiere-pro-using-pluraleyes/

    # vimeo.com/17415283 Uploaded

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