1. Created for Press Play/IndieWire's "Genius Directors in Three Minutes" series:
    It is a well known fact that Quentin Tarantino is a self-proclaimed cinephile. But the writer/director's love for cinema is most obviously expressed through his own films. In addition to showing his characters spending a great deal of time discussing cinema, Tarantino's films are jam-packed with homages and visual references to the movies that have intrigued him throughout his life.

    Many filmmakers pay homage, but Tarantino takes things a step further by replicating exact moments from a variety of genres and smashing them together to create his own distinct vision. Just like 'Kill Bill: Vol 2' (2004) draws on 'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly' (1966) and 'Samurai Fiction' (1998), Tarantino's work often reflects Spaghetti Westerns and Japanese cinema--both new and old. His unique way of referencing other films allows him to bend genre boundaries and shatter the mold of what we expect to experience. While his methods are often criticized and he is accused of "ripping off" other filmmakers, it seems that Tarantino is simply writing love letters to the art he is ever so passionate about.

    From German silent-cinema to American B movies, the following video uses split-screen to demonstrate a few of the hundreds of visual film references over the course of Tarantino's career.

    Original Post: blogs.indiewire.com/pressplay/watch-quentin-tarantinos-best-visual-film-references-in-three-minutes-20150522

    Music: "Little Green Bag" by George Baker Selection
    Tarantino Films:
    'Reservoir Dogs' (1992)
    'Pulp Fiction' (1994)
    'Jackie Brown' (1997)
    'Kill Bill: Vol. 1' (2003)
    'Kill Bill: Vol. 2' (2004)
    'Death Proof' (2007)
    'Inglourious Basterds' (2009)
    'Django Unchained' (2012)

    Referenced Films (in order of appearance):
    'City on Fire' (1987)
    'Django' (1966)
    'Band of Outsiders' (1964)
    '8 1/2' (1963)
    'The Warriors' (1979)
    'Psycho' (1960)
    'Kiss Me Deadly' (1955)
    'The Flintstones' (1960-66)
    'Superchick' (1973)
    'The Graduate' (1967)
    'Citizen Kane' (1941)
    'Goke, Body Snatcher From Hell' (1968)
    'Lady Snowblood' (1973)
    'City of the Living Dead' (1980)
    'Black Sunday' (1977)
    'Game of Death' (1978)
    'Miller's Crossing' (1990)
    'Death Rides a Horse' (1966)
    'Gone in 60 Seconds' (1974)
    'Samurai Fiction' (1998)
    'Blade Runner' (1982)
    'The Searchers' (1956)
    'Once Upon a Time in the West' (1968)
    'Five Fingers of Death' (1972)
    'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly' (1966)
    'Convoy' (1978)
    'The Bird With the Crystal Plumage' (1970)
    'Unforgiven' (1992)
    'The Searchers' (1956)
    'Metropolis' (1927)
    'Django' (1966)
    'Gone With the Wind' (1939)
    'The Great Silence' (1968)
    'A Professional Gun' (1968)

    Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

    # vimeo.com/148955244 Uploaded 643K Plays 78 Comments
  2. Welcome to The Discarded Image. In this episode I'll be looking at the opening sequence from Francis Ford Coppola's 'The Conversation'.

    Help support the videos - patreon.com/thediscardedimage

    YouTube Version - http://bit.ly/1IUIqqM

    Sequence without commentary - vimeo.com/140654307

    Follow Me:

    - twitter.com/julianjpalmer
    - facebook.com/DiscardedImagery
    - youtube.com/c/thediscardedimagechannel

    Produced by 1848 Media.

    For educational purposes only.

    Roger Ebert on the film

    "'The Conversation' comes from another time and place than today’s thrillers, which are so often simple-minded. This movie is a sadly observant character study, about a man who has removed himself from life, thinks he can observe it dispassionately at an electronic remove, and finds that all of his barriers are worthless."

    Further Reading:

    Alexander Huls - theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/04/why-em-the-conversation-em-should-be-required-viewing-at-the-nsa/360213/

    Catherine Shoard - theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2015/apr/22/my-favourite-cannes-winner-the-conversation

    Nathan Marone - rogerebert.com/scanners/opening-shots-the-conversation

    Film:

    Rear Window (Hitchcock, 1954)
    Psycho (Hitchcock, 1960)
    Peeping Tom (Powell, 1960)
    Blow Up (Antonioni, 1966)
    Greetings (De Palma, 1968)
    2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)
    The Godfather (Coppola, 1972)
    The Godfather Part II (Coppola, 1974)
    The Conversation (Coppola, 1974)
    Apocalypse Now (Coppola, 1979)
    One From The Heart (Coppola, 1981)
    Rumble Fish (Coppola, 1983)
    Body Double (De Palma, 1984)
    1948 (Radford, 1984)
    Brazil (Gilliam, 1985)
    JFK (Stone, 1991)
    Bram Stoker's Dracula (Coppola, 1992)
    The Insider (Mann, 1999)
    Big Brother UK (Channel Four, 2003)
    Minority Report (Spielberg, 2002)
    Zodiac (Fincher, 2007)
    Paranormal Activity (Peli, 2007)
    Youth Without Youth (Coppola, 2007)
    Tetro (Coppola, 2009)
    Twixt (Coppola, 2011)
    Edward Snowden Interview (Poitras, 2013)
    The NSA and Surveillance Animation (Guardian, 2014)
    Citizenfour (Poitras, 2014)
    Glenn Greenwald: Why privacy matters (Ted Talks, 2014)
    Gone Girl (Fincher, 2014)
    Blackhat (Mann, 2014)

    Music:

    Telephone Thing - The Fall
    Observer - Gary Numan
    The Social Network - Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross
    JFK - John Williams
    The Insider - Pieter Bourke & Lisa Gerrard
    The Conversation - David Shire

    # vimeo.com/140953561 Uploaded 4,268 Plays 9 Comments
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