GM IRVING SOTO/  KICK TV

  1. Menkyo Grandmaster Irving Soto /Jet -te powerful - kicking /How to make your kicks work

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  2. Menkyo GM irving soto incredibly displays of handgun techniques / Gm Daivd Lebron & Displays beautiful sticky & trap hands and push hands

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  3. GRANDMASTER AARON BANKS MMA YMCA NYC XMAS SHOW 1993 / PERFORMANCE BY GRANDMASTER IRVING SOTO
    Banks on Competition
    When it comes to fighting, preparation is 99 percent of winning, Aaron Banks says. So learn the rules ahead of time. Since the tournament director has the authority to make minor changes prior to the event, be sure to ask about lastminute modifications. With a little experience, you will learn what deviations are likely to occur and be prepared to adjust your tactics accordingly.

    If you compete in forms, knowing the rules is just as important, Banks says. Some groups limit the time you have to do your routine, while others limit the number of times you can kiai or the number of gymnastic moves you can do.

    The key to victory in kata, Banks says, is to not “miss the emotion boat. You have to make the observers think you believe in what you are doing. You must psyche yourself up with emotion and feeling. Wipe that smile off your face and show a serious attitude. Be balanced, incorporate power, perform genuine techniques and show indomitable spirit. To do all this, you have to rehearse. A competitor who goes into an event without knowing what’s going on or without being ready turns himself into a blind man.” —F.B.

    Banks on Promotion If a person puts on a tournament, Aaron Banks says, he is responsible for the money each competitor pays him.

    “Too many [promoters] take advantage of people who are paying to be evaluated correctly. Those who turn a blind eye to judges who have a tendency to lean toward their own students must clean up their act or stop doing tournaments.”

    The following are Banks’ tips for better competitive events: •Make a short speech at the beginning of your event to explain what rule changes, if any, have been made.

    • Tell the competitors that you expect them to respect each other.

    • Remind the competitors that if they have any problems with the judging or rules, they should report them to you.

    •Make yourself visible. Let everyone know you have high expectations for their behavior.

    • Remove in a respectful manner any official who is caught cheating.

    • Devise new ways to make the tournament run as smoothly and professionally as possible.

    • Avoid adding divisions until you have enough qualified judges who know how to officiate in those divisions.

    • Evaluate your motivation. If you are doing it for the money and not because you love the martial arts, get out.
    —F.B.

    Crooked Staff
    If you are participating in a tournament and witness any cheating by the referees or staff, take your case to the tournament director, Aaron Banks says. “If he doesn’t make an honest effort to find out what’s going on and correct the problem [before] the next event, don’t go to his tournament again. There are plenty more to choose from.” —F.B.

    World’s greatest promoter Aaron Banks looks back on the milestones of his 332-tournament career

    A former actor who has appeared on television and Broadway, Aaron Banks managed to finagle his Oriental World of Self-Defense onto ABC’s Wide World of Sports five times in 1974.

    From his meager martial arts beginnings in 1960, Aaron Banks has organized 352 karate tournaments, 250 martial arts shows and more than 1,000 demonstrations.

    Chuck Norris made a guest appearance at the 32nd Annual Oriental World of Self-Defense, held at Madison Square Garden on September 13, 2000.

    Chuck Norris is one of the legends who built a reputation at Aaron Banks’ martial arts tournaments. He is shown here after winning the middleweight division of the Professional Karate World

    In addition to being America’s premier martial arts promoter, Aaron Banks is an accomplished practitioner of goju-ryu and shotokan karate.

    Aaron Banks appeared on the cover of the December 1971 Black Belt. The controversial story examined accusations that he was compromising the integrity of the martial arts for financial gain.
    Inside all of us is one truly great accomplishment waiting to happen. For Aaron Banks, that seed has become a reality 352 times—in the form of a martial arts tournament. He has made it his mission to show America what the real martial arts are all about, and he has done so admirably. Much of the history martial artists around the world discuss came about because of the Banks’ crusade to bring the Asian arts to the general public via exhibitions and tournaments held at Madison Square Garden and other well-known venues. There is no doubt that 21st century students have such a variety of styles and competitions to choose from because of the labors of this karate pioneer. —F.B.

    Aaron Banks has a reputation for accomplishing the unimaginable. For example, in 1964 he brought Chinese kung fu, Korean moo duk kwan, Japanese and Okinawan goju-ryu karate, judo and boxing under the same roof in his New York Karate Academy. High-ranked instructors from goju-ryu, Banks’ base style, phoned to express their dismay that he allowed all those systems to be taught at his school.

    Banks’ answer was and still is unassailable: “If you go to the market for bread, you have a variety to choose from. The same should go for the martial arts.”

    Annoyed that the arts were being taught mostly in back alleys and low-end health clubs, Banks became intent on having them viewed as an art form. He began holding exhibitions in cultural centers that hosted opera, ballet and other manifestations of classical art. Many an eyebrow was raised in response, but he persevered in his effort to educate Americans, many of whom received their only exposure to the martial arts via movie clips of Sean Connery and James Cagney executing the occasional judo move.

    Banks took it upon himself to show the world what the martial arts were all about

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  4. The Later /Gramdmaster Aaron Banks live martial arts show at the hotel pennsylvania NYC (part one) /featuring Grandmaster Irving soto outstanding performance / Aiki jujitsu

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  5. By Grandmaster Irving Soto
    Atemi jujitsu waza
    Japanese name
    Kanji:
    当て身
    Hiragana:
    あてみ
    In Japanese martial arts, the term Grandmaster Irving Soto Ryu Atemi Jujitsu waza (当て身?) designates blows to the body, [1] as opposed to twisting of joints, strangleholds, holding techniques and throws. Atemi can be delivered by any part of the body to any part of the opponent's body. They can be percussive or use 'soft' power. Karate is a typical martial art focusing on percussive Atemi. The location of nerve and pressure points, such as might be used for certain acupressure methods, also often informs the choice of targets for Atemi (see kyusho). Some strikes against vital parts of the body can kill or incapacitate the opponent: on the solar plexus, at the temple, under the nose, in the eyes, genitals, or under the chin. Traditional Japanese martial arts (the ancestors of judo, jujutsu and aikido) do not commonly practice Atemi, since they were supposed to be used on the battlefield against armored opponents. However, there are certain exceptions.
    Atemi Waza Jujitsu can be complete techniques in and of them, but are also often used to briefly break an opponent's balance (see kuzushi) or resolve. This is the predominant usage of Atemi in aikido. [2] A painful but non-fatal blow to an area such as the eyes, face, or some vulnerable part of the abdomen can open the way for a more damaging technique, such as a throw or joint lock. Even if the blow does not land, the opponent can be distracted, and may instinctively contort their body (e.g., jerking their head back from a face strike) in such a way that they lose their balance.
    The development of Atemi Waza Jujitsu techniques arises from the evolution of the Japanese martial arts, in particular jujutsu. Early styles of jujutsu from Sengoku-era Japan were created as a means of unarmed combat for a samurai who had lost his weapons on the battlefield. The purpose of jujutsu was to disarm the opponents and use their own weapon against them. As such, strikes to the body were limited as the intended victim would have been wearing extensive body arm our. However, in later styles of jujutsu from Edo-period Japan empty-handed strikes to the body became more common as full-scale military engagement began to decline. This meant that the jujutsu practitioner's opponent would not have been wearing arm our and the vital points that form the crux of Atemi-waza were more exposed. Thus Atemi began to play a pivotal role in unarmed killing and restraining techniques.
    References Atemi jujitsu (当て身)

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GM IRVING SOTO/ KICK TV

Menkyo Grandmaster Irving Soto

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  • Menkyo Grandmaster  Irving  Soto

    GM IRVING SOTO/ KICK TV

    Created by Menkyo Grandmaster Irving Soto
    22 hours ago

    The Channel was created for the public to understand different style of martial arts science

    by Menkyo Grandmaster Irving Soto

  • Menkyo Grandmaster  Irving  Soto

    By Grandmaster Irving Soto
    Atemi jujitsu waza
    Japanese name
    Kanji:
    当て身
    Hiragana:
    あてみ
    In Japanese martial arts, the term Grandmaster Irving Soto Ryu Atemi Jujitsu waza (当て身?) designates blows to the body, [1] as opposed to twisting of joints, strangleholds, holding techniques and throws. Atemi can be delivered by any part of the body to any part of the opponent's body. They can be percussive or use 'soft' power. Karate is a typical martial art focusing on percussive Atemi. The location of nerve and pressure points, such as might be used for certain acupressure methods, also often informs the choice of targets for Atemi (see kyusho). Some strikes against vital parts of the body can kill or incapacitate the opponent: on the solar plexus, at the temple, under the nose, in the eyes, genitals, or under the chin. Traditional Japanese martial arts (the ancestors of judo, jujutsu and aikido) do not commonly practice Atemi, since they were supposed to be used on the battlefield against armored opponents. However, there are certain exceptions.
    Atemi Waza Jujitsu can be complete techniques in and of them, but are also often used to briefly break an opponent's balance (see kuzushi) or resolve. This is the predominant usage of Atemi in aikido. [2] A painful but non-fatal blow to an area such as the eyes, face, or some vulnerable part of the abdomen can open the way for a more damaging technique, such as a throw or joint lock. Even if the blow does not land, the opponent can be distracted, and may instinctively contort their body (e.g., jerking their head back from a face strike) in such a way that they lose their balance.
    The development of Atemi Waza Jujitsu techniques arises from the evolution of the Japanese martial arts, in particular jujutsu. Early styles of jujutsu from Sengoku-era Japan were created as a means of unarmed combat for a samurai who had lost his weapons on the battlefield. The purpose of jujutsu was to disarm the opponents and use their own weapon against them. As such, strikes to the body were limited as the intended victim would have been wearing extensive body arm our. However, in later styles of jujutsu from Edo-period Japan empty-handed strikes to the body became more common as full-scale military engagement began to decline. This meant that the jujutsu practitioner's opponent would not have been wearing arm our and the vital points that form the crux of Atemi-waza were more exposed. Thus Atemi began to play a pivotal role in unarmed killing and restraining techniques.
    References Atemi jujitsu (当て身)

    by Menkyo Grandmaster Irving Soto

  • Menkyo Grandmaster  Irving  Soto

    Grandmaster Irving Soto The Channel was created for the public to understand different style of martial arts science

    by Menkyo Grandmaster Irving Soto

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