ACE2015 - The Asian Conference on Education 2015

  1. 20054

    This article is concerned with ‘possible educational futures, not as a futuristic or predictive exercise, but through an analysis of current trends in educational policy However ‘futures thinking’ has not been a major strand of research and theory in the sociology of education or in educational studies generally. As a result, it has been largely left to educationalists who give little explicit attention either to sociological debates about current social changes that are often masked by terms like globalization and knowledge societies, or to how the question of knowledge is understood in these debates, The typical approach of such thinking is to identify what is seen as the increasing mismatch between the schools and some of the global changes in the wider society that are discussed in other articles in this Special Issue. Such approaches tend to be concerned with how the formal education system, and schools in particular, almost systematically resist such changes. Furthermore, the assumptions of such future thinking tend to be that certain wider social changes are not only inevitable, but of positive benefit to humanity and that schooling in the future will have to follow them. This following is invariably viewed as unproblematic. The future of schooling in these scenarios is one of throwing off what is seen as its medieval past and adapting to global trends towards greater flexibility and openness to change from individuals, as a consequence, it is predicted that school-in will become less and less differentiated from other social institutions.

    Narayan Chandara Saha, Panch Sila Buddha Bihar Buddha Navyuvak Sangha, India
    Prasanta Sarkar, Panch Sila Buddha Bihar Buddha Navyuvak Sangha, India

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  2. (18885) Among the many studies conducted on gender differences in terms of classroom management among tertiary faculty, our study is the first to use qualitative method of inquiry. Class observations, interview, and document analysis (i.e., syllabi) were employed to gather data from respondents (n=30; male=25, female=15). Triangulation and member check were done to validate data. Themes were generated from the qualitative data collected. Results show that male teachers tend to be more structured in terms of the teaching strategies they employ while female teachers are more innovative. In engaging students during instruction, male teachers give reminders while female teachers do monitoring. In dealing with disruptive behaviors, male teachers are more inclined to counseling while female teachers tend to reprimand and refer students to authorities.

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  3. (17847) Peace Education encompasses a diversity of pedagogical approaches within formal curricula in schools and universities and non-formal education projects implemented by local, regional and international organizations. It aims to cultivate the knowledge and practices of a culture of peace. In Lebanon, this culture is mainly promoted by non-governmental organizations and engaged intellectuals and artists since the late 1990s. Also, grassroots student dialogue clubs have flourished in a number of secondary schools. However, in the university context, it is considered to be a rare phenomenon. This paper introduces first to the issue of Peace Education in Lebanon. It then presents the conceptual characteristics and examples of applications of a Peace Education approach I developed and adopted in my classrooms from 2007 till 2014 in three universities with 3000 students of different religious, cultural, social-economic and political backgrounds. In conclusion, it identifies the positive changes the various class activities yielded in students' perceptions and relations, and the obstacles that this approach faced in a context of local and regional physical and psychological wars.

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  4. (18932) This study is a description of the challenges teachers face in their attempts to live a healthy lifestyle. In Trinidad and Tobago, risk factors for the leading causes of morbidity and mortality are related to lifestyle practices. The diseases are hypertension, diabetes, heart diseases and cancers while the risk factors are unhealthy dietary practices, lack of physical exercise, high levels of stress, cigarette smoking and excessive alcohol consumption. In addition to the benefits that accrue to teachers when they practice healthy lifestyles, they are also well positioned to be role models to their students. The question: “What do you think are some of factors that are militating against teachers’ practice of healthy lifestyles?”, was posed as an online discussion topic to secondary school teachers enrolled in a postgraduate in-service diploma in education program. This was a follow up to a previous lecture on health and wellbeing. The findings revealed that teachers were unanimous in their responses of being unable to practice healthy lifestyles due to administrative and personal barriers. Major themes emerging from discussion threads were – lack of support staff like secretaries and teaching assistants, resulting in work overload, high stress levels and burnout; commuting for long hours and traffic congestion precluding time to prepare healthy meals or engage in physical exercise resulting in poor nutrition and obesity; high prevalence of students’ indiscipline coupled with unreasonable demands of central and school administrators leading to high stress levels among teachers. Teachers are therefore unable to be healthy lifestyle role models.

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  5. (20049) Historical contact between English and Japanese led to the extensive introduction of English-based lexicon. Although, the Japanese language had successfully incorporated Chinese-based written system and a considerable number of Chinese loanwords, the contact with the English language due to the political and historical factors was drastic and uncontrollable.
    According to different estimates loanwords constitute about 10% of Contemporary Japanese Lexicon and this percentage keeps increasing due to the constant borrowing from English. The inflow of loanwords results in the increase of near synonymic pairs (with one word being of native or Sino-Japanese origin, and another being of English origin). There is a number of problems loanwords cause to speakers and learners of Japanese, as well as to Japanese learners of English. Stanlaw (2010) singles out several problems that English loanwords pose for the learners of Japanese, such as, ‘Students believe English loanwords mean the same thing as their original words do in English.’ or ‘English loanwords seem to reflect a Japanese copy-cat mentality’
    Present research aims at clarifying the use of the particular group of English loanwords – English adjectives-based loanword modifiers. Based on the data from Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese (BCCWJ by National Institute of Japanese Language and Linguistics) we demonstrate the constraints on the use of loanword modifiers and argue that the extensive borrowing of English words is one of the ways for the Japanese culture to differentiate between similar phenomena of native and foreign origin.

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ACE2015 - The Asian Conference on Education 2015

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