American Museum of Natural History

Tiny, faraway Pluto was first spied in 1930. This icy world is one of thousands of rocky bodies that make up the Kuiper Belt, a ring that circles our solar system beyond Neptune. Until recently, the most powerful telescopes on Earth and in space could only capture blurry impressions of Pluto and its moons. But in 2015, New Horizons became the first spacecraft to visit the Pluto system, returning detailed images and data that will bring our distant neighbor’s surface, atmosphere, and internal composition into focus for the first time.

RELATED LINKS

NASA: New Horizons
nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/main/index.html

New Horizons: NASA’s Mission to Pluto
pluto.jhuapl.edu/

OpenSpace
openspace.itn.liu.se/

Eyes On Pluto Interactive Visualization Tool
eyes.jpl.nasa.gov/launch2.html?document=$SERVERURL/content/documents/newhorizons/newhorizons.xml

Solar System Exploration: Pluto
solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Pluto

Nature: Pluto fly-by—a graphical guide to the historic mission
nature.com/news/pluto-fly-by-a-graphical-guide-to-the-historic-mission-1.17927

Science Bulletins: New Horizons Mission to Pluto
youtube.com/watch?v=HqhedfIr8FU

# vimeo.com/138242171 Uploaded 203 Plays 0 Comments

American Museum of Natural History

AMNH

A look at the science and exhibitions taking place at New York City's American Museum of Natural History.

Browse This Channel

Shout Box

Heads up: the shoutbox will be retiring soon. It’s tired of working, and can’t wait to relax. You can still send a message to the channel owner, though!

Channels are a simple, beautiful way to showcase and watch videos. Browse more Channels.