1. There is a point in loading the rear roller of a loom when tension needs to be kept on the thread/yard. In order to accomplish this the weaver need only put a simple knot in the warp on the breast beam. That's what is seen here in the video, but it's not the reason why I shot this more-than-brief scene. I shot this sequence to highlight the beautiful nature of my mentor, Susan. Both she and her husband are artists...retired now, but still deeply involved in various art communities. Really wonderful people who walk with others as they learn. Comprehensive knowledge. Practical. Compassionate. Deeply hospitable. I am just so fortunate to have her for my weaving mentor. There's no doubt in my mind that I could read a book and figure out wool, spinning, and weaving...but why? Doing hands-on teaching rounds out the experience into something truly human that actually does appropriate service to the activity itself. Words are good, but fall short of the actual doing of actual art. You can describe art with words, but you can teach art without any words, and the art itself is of course, sheer expression in its own right. Deep calling to deep. Here's just a brief snippet of our time the other day. There is no substitute for a good teacher...

    # vimeo.com/144274264 Uploaded 68 Plays 0 Comments
  2. Selected from their holding pen, ewes are placed in a sitting position in a shearing stall. Their belly and neck are shorn, followed by each side. Fleeces are rolled into a ball and loaded...

    # vimeo.com/131619274 Uploaded 73 Plays 0 Comments
  3. This is the first day of shearing for this young woman...

    # vimeo.com/131616462 Uploaded 36 Plays 0 Comments
  4. After setting up the pen and herding them into a more confined area where they can be handled, the ewes are ready to be selected one by one for shearing.

    # vimeo.com/131614378 Uploaded 14 Plays 0 Comments
  5. This is the first day of shearing for this young woman...

    # vimeo.com/131616070 Uploaded 55 Plays 0 Comments

Boreal Weaver

boreal weaver

In 2000 I left a 30 year profession and returned to my agricultural/outdoor roots, moving to north central Canada. I live a quiet life...solitary, simple, connected to my community here. We have established two fruit orchards, raise hay, grow our own…


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In 2000 I left a 30 year profession and returned to my agricultural/outdoor roots, moving to north central Canada. I live a quiet life...solitary, simple, connected to my community here. We have established two fruit orchards, raise hay, grow our own food, and sell items out of our home.

I started training llamas for backcountry packing in 1996; these are some of the most tractable animals with whom I have ever worked. Ever since that time it has been my intention to process their fibre and weave. I am currently learning this craft.

Combining it with the rich colour from our haskap (3,000 plant orchard available for U-Pick) produces a beautiful, vibrant, naturally dyed fibre. This channel serves as a resource for me upon which to post some of this procedure/these discoveries, and their subsequent refinements.

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