CCS Browser

  1. How can CO2 injected underground stay securely stored there?
    Residual trapping is one of the natural trapping processes that ensures injected CO2 stays securely underground and will not leak to the surface or into ground water. When the injected CO2 plume moves through the geological storage site, it displaces a portion of the water in the rock's microscopic pores, with CO2 'bubbles' getting left behind. As the CO2 passes, water infiltrates back into the rock, permanently trapping the CO2 bubbles, which will eventually dissolve in water. This results in a considerable volume of CO2 being trapped as a so-called 'residual phase' thereby limiting the extent of travel of the CO2.

    The microscopic pore spaces shown in the animation have been magnified many hundreds of times and normally would be invisible to the human eye. The animation above represents a space smaller than a millimeter (or less than 1/16 of an inch). To find out more about CO2 capture and storage (CCS).Visit http://www.ccsbrowser.com

    The CCS Browser has been provided by the CO2 Capture Project, a partnership of major energy companies working together to advance CO2 capture and storage (CCS). Visit http://www.co2captureproject.org to find out more.

    # vimeo.com/78543277 Uploaded
  2. How can CO2 injected underground stay securely stored there?
    Dissolution trapping is one of the several natural trapping processes that ensures injected CO2 stays securely underground and will not leak to the surface or into ground water. CO2 stored in a geological formation will dissolve in the surrounding salty water over a timeframe from decades to hundreds of years. This process will be limited in highly salty waters. Over a longer period of time, the salty water with increasing levels of dissolved CO2 becomes denser and sinks towards the bottom of the formation in a process called 'convection'.

    The microscopic pore spaces shown in the animation have been magnified many hundreds of times and normally would be invisible to the human eye. The animation above represents a space smaller than a millimeter (or less than 1/16 of an inch).

    To find out more about CO2 capture and storage (CCS). Visit http://www.ccsbrowser.com

    The CCS Browser has been provided by the CO2 Capture Project, a partnership of major energy companies working together to advance CO2 capture and storage (CCS). Visit http://www.co2captureproject.org to find out more.

    # vimeo.com/78542749 Uploaded
  3. How can CO2 injected underground stay securely stored there?
    Mineral trapping is one of the several natural trapping processes that ensures injected CO2 stays securely underground and will not leak to the surface or into ground water. Over thousands and hundreds of thousands of years, the CO2 rich fluid reacts with minerals in the rocks to form solid carbonates. Known as mineral trapping, this is the most stable form of CO2 trapping.

    The microscopic pore spaces shown in the animation have been magnified many hundreds of times and normally would be invisible to the human eye. The animation above represents a space smaller than a millimeter (or less than 1/16 of an inch).

    To find out more about CO2 capture and storage (CCS). Visit http://www.ccsbrowser.com

    The CCS Browser has been provided by the CO2 Capture Project, a partnership of major energy companies working together to advance CO2 capture and storage (CCS). Visit http://www.co2captureproject.org to find out more.

    # vimeo.com/78542424 Uploaded
  4. How can CO2 injected underground stay securely stored there?
    Structural trapping is one of the natural trapping processes that ensures injected CO2 stays securely underground and will not leak to the surface or into ground water. Injected fluid CO2 tends to rise via buoyancy through the storage formation until it reaches a natural impediment such as one of the impermeable layers of caprock. This is known as structural trapping.

    The microscopic pore spaces shown in the animation have been magnified many hundreds of times and normally would be invisible to the human eye. The animation above represents a space smaller than a millimeter (or less than 1/16 of an inch).

    To find out more about CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS). Visit http://www.ccsbrowser.com

    The CCS Browser has been provided by the CO2 Capture Project, a partnership of major energy companies working together to advance CO2 capture and storage (CCS). Visit http://www.co2captureproject.org to find out more.

    # vimeo.com/78541872 Uploaded
  5. CO2 capture and storage (CCS) has the potential to play a significant role in reducing CO2 emissions. The CCS Browser has been created by the CO2 Capture Project to help you find out more about the process of capturing CO2 from industrial sources and securely storing it underground. To find out more about CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS). Visit http://www.ccsbrowser.com

    The CO2 Capture Project is a partnership of major energy companies working together to advance CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS). Visit http://www.co2captureproject.org to find out more.

    # vimeo.com/78522524 Uploaded

CCS Browser

CCS Browser

CO2 capture and storage (CCS) has the potential to play a significant role in reducing CO2 emissions. The CCS Browser has been created by the CO2 Capture Project to help you find out more about the process of capturing CO2 from industrial sources and…


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CO2 capture and storage (CCS) has the potential to play a significant role in reducing CO2 emissions. The CCS Browser has been created by the CO2 Capture Project to help you find out more about the process of capturing CO2 from industrial sources and securely storing it underground. Visit http://www.ccsbrowser.com

The CO2 Capture Project is a partnership of major energy companies working together to advance CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS). Visit http://www.co2captureproject.org to find out more.

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